House nullifies suspension of varsity licences by NUC Reviewed by Momizat on . The House committee on Public Petitions has declared the suspension of the operational licence of Lead City University and others by the National Universities C The House committee on Public Petitions has declared the suspension of the operational licence of Lead City University and others by the National Universities C Rating:
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House nullifies suspension of varsity licences by NUC

The House committee on Public Petitions has declared the suspension of the operational licence of Lead City University and others by the National Universities Commission (NUC) as null and void, ultra vires and of no effect.

Presenting its recommendations, Chairman of the Committee, Representative Uzo Azubuike, mandated the NUC not to take further steps that will in any manner interrupt the normal academic programmes and activities of the accredited courses of Lead City University and the others.

The report also mandated the commission to carry out a forensic audit on the affected universities and advice the government as required by Law.

The National University Commission (NUC) had claimed that the seven suspended private institutions will continue operations, but have been banned from admitting new students.

The deputy executive secretary of the commission, Mr Akinbode Agbaoye made the clarification in reaction to a petition filed by Lead City University at the hearing called by House of Representatives on Wednesday.

 

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  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1042319936 Gbolahan Obadimeji Philips

    Why is Leads University is always at loggerhead with NUC?

  • olanrewajusmart

    THERE is a disconnect between my experience at Lead City University, Ibadan and the decision, which I read in the newspaper on July 5, that the license granted to the university by the National Universities Commission (NUC) had been suspended. I was a guest of Lead City University on May 9th when I gave the 2012 Distinguished Faculty Lecture, and I stayed there for another two days to observe the campus; interact with the faculty, staff, and students; and to hold a series of discussions on what I could do to elevate the status, prestige, and reputation of the university.

    What did I see at Lead City University? To put things in perspective, Lead City is a university campus that can be compared with many other institutions in any part of the world with a similar foundation date. I was impressed by what I saw at Lead City, and I will itemize my impressions in the order in which I encountered them, as well as bring out their significance in relation to the objectives of a university.

    First, Lead City University is in an impressive campus with an elaborate infrastructure, far ahead of at least seven state-owned universities in Nigeria that I visited in the last five years. In its physical space alone, the facilities at Lead City University are not only adequate, but can take more students, more staff, and more visitors.

    Second, also regarding infrastructure, the continuing expansion is not only noticeable, but remarkable. I made two suggestions that the management not only approved, but indicated that they have been working on. One is on a beautification project of landscaping and planting trees. My second suggestion was on energy supply. I discussed with the management the possibility of rethinking the energy supply based on the use of diesel.

    However, I know that infrastructure is not the best judge of performance. The university is an idea – of knowledge generation, research, excellent teaching, and much more. On my own, and without being led by the Registrar or Vice-Chancellor, I began to look for those ideas that were in place.

    The body of ideas that I discovered from my self-guided tours leads me to my third point. Universities must advance the interest of students. In this regard, Lead City University is true to its mission. In five selected departments, I saw the teachers on the ground. The library is well stocked with books, journals, and diverse instructional materials in various fields. There are commensurate facilities for recreation and sports. For African athletes, the challenges are multi-fold, with the lack of recreation and sports facilities to practice,Lead City University has taken the step to correct this error, creating sporting facilities that include a well-equipped gym, basketball court, and even an Olympic size swimming pool.

    It is very remarkable that Lead City University is not disconnected from its public – a big plus, and the fourth point that I noticed. Like urban universities in the West, it should develop this connection further. Local creativity should be an asset to Lead City and an integral part of university life. In this era of increasing globalisation, these peculiar aspects will not only enhance the status of Lead City University but also guarantee its attractiveness and connection to the outside world.

    The contribution of this university to the city of Ibadan must be underscored, emphasized, and appreciated. It is building a new culture that combines educational knowledge with entrepreneurship. I cannot emphasize enough the significance of this crucial connection to the city. The students are not caged and are part of the dynamic city experience – a worthy model in terms connecting the student population with the real world, where the students will live and function after their university education.

    I do not know the transgressions committed by Lead City University, and I cannot hold any brief for them. However, my experience on what I saw on the ground did not correlate with the reasons I read concerning the suspension of its license. Given the manpower and infrastructural facilities available at Lead City, I believe that the NUC and the public must correct the inadequacies where noticed, rather than de-market and destroy the institution and the legacy it has established in its short existence. Although I learned that the immediate sanction is that the institution should not admit students for the current year, the NUC and the Nigerian public should be aware that the long- term consequences are enormous.

    From this unfortunate example of a sudden announcement without pre-warning, without detailed information to the public, without a paper trail for decent people and committed scholars to review, and without data that will compare one university to another, a new culture to establish and demonstrate transparency, fairness and justice must emerge.

    First, the NUC and the public must actually agree on what universities do, and what they are expected to do in our society. Political leaders and citizens must all agree on what we want private universities to do, and how they have to be defined, so that we do not shift our methods of evaluation. Our emphasis, as far as I understand it, is that we want students to learn, acquire skills, and be thoughtful. We want to educate.

    Second, it is imperative that the NUC makes public notices of its incremental warnings and sanctions, elaborate visitation reports, and responses by universities. A disorderly announcement of suspension does not take the students and parents into consideration and confidence, nor does it take cognizance of the investments made by all the stakeholders.

    Third, private and public institutions must now be compared in relation to available resources and outcome. From my experience, were Lead City University owned by a state government, its license would not have been suspended – not because the state school is running well, but because the NUC and its chairman would not have the courage or the clout to deal with the nationalistic uproar that would greet their decision.

    Fourth, an independent body should be in place to examine what people do with degrees after graduation. Until such an independent body emerges, Lead City University may take it upon itself to build such a database as part of its public relations. I know that using the market to test the quality of university products is still difficult in Nigeria, but ultimately market forces will determine the worth of these graduates.

    In the spirit of its own integrity, the NUC must not just give one-liner reasons for suspending a university’s license. Their own system must be transparent so that the public may know the reasons for the decisions of the NUC beyond the brief catalogue that it provides in paid newspaper advertisements. The NUC must also be accountable to a higher body to ensure that it does not abuse its powers.

    Lastly, and on a note of caution, there is the need for credibility, fairness, and justice. When will the licenses of all the new federal universities be withdrawn since they clearly have nothing on the ground to justify the recruitment of a single student? Why are several state universities, which do not have half of the intellectual resources and infrastructure of Lead City University, still standing? Has Lead City University truly failed in the auditing of its structures, processes, rules, and personnel? If so, the reports should be made public. What is the nation doing in striving to reclaim the lost integrity of its university system? The NUC should really applaud Lead City’s efforts by encouraging them to do even better, in the hopes that other institutions can copy and learn from them. We really do not want to think that private institutions are being treated unfairly or picked on for irrelevant things, when underperforming state and federal universities are left alone. We need as many efficient universities as possible.

    These are food for thought in our collective drive for a better and just society. Shaping human minds is shaping humanity, history, and development. It is serious business, and must be rigorously and doggedly pursued. A commitment to a solid foundation and a sustainable education sector should not be compromised on the platter of politics.  The NUC must always conduct its business in a way to retain the confidence and trust of the majority of sincere educators.

    • Falola is a University Distinguished Professor and the Frances Higginbotham Nalle Centennial Professor, The University of Texas at Austin.

  • olanrewajusmart

    THERE is a disconnect between my experience at Lead City University, Ibadan and the decision, which I read in the newspaper on July 5, that the license granted to the university by the National Universities Commission (NUC) had been suspended. I was a guest of Lead City University on May 9th when I gave the 2012 Distinguished Faculty Lecture, and I stayed there for another two days to observe the campus; interact with the faculty, staff, and students; and to hold a series of discussions on what I could do to elevate the status, prestige, and reputation of the university.

    What did I see at Lead City University? To put things in perspective, Lead City is a university campus that can be compared with many other institutions in any part of the world with a similar foundation date. I was impressed by what I saw at Lead City, and I will itemize my impressions in the order in which I encountered them, as well as bring out their significance in relation to the objectives of a university.

    First, Lead City University is in an impressive campus with an elaborate infrastructure, far ahead of at least seven state-owned universities in Nigeria that I visited in the last five years. In its physical space alone, the facilities at Lead City University are not only adequate, but can take more students, more staff, and more visitors.

    Second, also regarding infrastructure, the continuing expansion is not only noticeable, but remarkable. I made two suggestions that the management not only approved, but indicated that they have been working on. One is on a beautification project of landscaping and planting trees. My second suggestion was on energy supply. I discussed with the management the possibility of rethinking the energy supply based on the use of diesel.

    However, I know that infrastructure is not the best judge of performance. The university is an idea – of knowledge generation, research, excellent teaching, and much more. On my own, and without being led by the Registrar or Vice-Chancellor, I began to look for those ideas that were in place.

    The body of ideas that I discovered from my self-guided tours leads me to my third point. Universities must advance the interest of students. In this regard, Lead City University is true to its mission. In five selected departments, I saw the teachers on the ground. The library is well stocked with books, journals, and diverse instructional materials in various fields. There are commensurate facilities for recreation and sports. For African athletes, the challenges are multi-fold, with the lack of recreation and sports facilities to practice,Lead City University has taken the step to correct this error, creating sporting facilities that include a well-equipped gym, basketball court, and even an Olympic size swimming pool.

    It is very remarkable that Lead City University is not disconnected from its public – a big plus, and the fourth point that I noticed. Like urban universities in the West, it should develop this connection further. Local creativity should be an asset to Lead City and an integral part of university life. In this era of increasing globalisation, these peculiar aspects will not only enhance the status of Lead City University but also guarantee its attractiveness and connection to the outside world.

    The contribution of this university to the city of Ibadan must be underscored, emphasized, and appreciated. It is building a new culture that combines educational knowledge with entrepreneurship. I cannot emphasize enough the significance of this crucial connection to the city. The students are not caged and are part of the dynamic city experience – a worthy model in terms connecting the student population with the real world, where the students will live and function after their university education.

    I do not know the transgressions committed by Lead City University, and I cannot hold any brief for them. However, my experience on what I saw on the ground did not correlate with the reasons I read concerning the suspension of its license. Given the manpower and infrastructural facilities available at Lead City, I believe that the NUC and the public must correct the inadequacies where noticed, rather than de-market and destroy the institution and the legacy it has established in its short existence. Although I learned that the immediate sanction is that the institution should not admit students for the current year, the NUC and the Nigerian public should be aware that the long- term consequences are enormous.

    From this unfortunate example of a sudden announcement without pre-warning, without detailed information to the public, without a paper trail for decent people and committed scholars to review, and without data that will compare one university to another, a new culture to establish and demonstrate transparency, fairness and justice must emerge.

    First, the NUC and the public must actually agree on what universities do, and what they are expected to do in our society. Political leaders and citizens must all agree on what we want private universities to do, and how they have to be defined, so that we do not shift our methods of evaluation. Our emphasis, as far as I understand it, is that we want students to learn, acquire skills, and be thoughtful. We want to educate.

    Second, it is imperative that the NUC makes public notices of its incremental warnings and sanctions, elaborate visitation reports, and responses by universities. A disorderly announcement of suspension does not take the students and parents into consideration and confidence, nor does it take cognizance of the investments made by all the stakeholders.

    Third, private and public institutions must now be compared in relation to available resources and outcome. From my experience, were Lead City University owned by a state government, its license would not have been suspended – not because the state school is running well, but because the NUC and its chairman would not have the courage or the clout to deal with the nationalistic uproar that would greet their decision.

    Fourth, an independent body should be in place to examine what people do with degrees after graduation. Until such an independent body emerges, Lead City University may take it upon itself to build such a database as part of its public relations. I know that using the market to test the quality of university products is still difficult in Nigeria, but ultimately market forces will determine the worth of these graduates.

    In the spirit of its own integrity, the NUC must not just give one-liner reasons for suspending a university’s license. Their own system must be transparent so that the public may know the reasons for the decisions of the NUC beyond the brief catalogue that it provides in paid newspaper advertisements. The NUC must also be accountable to a higher body to ensure that it does not abuse its powers.

    Lastly, and on a note of caution, there is the need for credibility, fairness, and justice. When will the licenses of all the new federal universities be withdrawn since they clearly have nothing on the ground to justify the recruitment of a single student? Why are several state universities, which do not have half of the intellectual resources and infrastructure of Lead City University, still standing? Has Lead City University truly failed in the auditing of its structures, processes, rules, and personnel? If so, the reports should be made public. What is the nation doing in striving to reclaim the lost integrity of its university system? The NUC should really applaud Lead City’s efforts by encouraging them to do even better, in the hopes that other institutions can copy and learn from them. We really do not want to think that private institutions are being treated unfairly or picked on for irrelevant things, when underperforming state and federal universities are left alone. We need as many efficient universities as possible.

    These are food for thought in our collective drive for a better and just society. Shaping human minds is shaping humanity, history, and development. It is serious business, and must be rigorously and doggedly pursued. A commitment to a solid foundation and a sustainable education sector should not be compromised on the platter of politics.  The NUC must always conduct its business in a way to retain the confidence and trust of the majority of sincere educators.

    • Falola is a University Distinguished Professor and the Frances Higginbotham Nalle Centennial Professor, The University of Texas at Austin.

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