Advertisement

Recovered Loots: Sagay Proposes 5% Cut To Agencies Involved

Channels Television  
Updated April 15, 2017

Recovered Loots: Sagay Proposes 5% Cut To Agencies InvolvedThe Chairman of the Presidential Advisory Committee Against Corruption, Professor Itsa Sagay, has proposed five per cent cut from any money recovered by any government agencies from looters.

Speaking during an interview with Channels Television, Professor Sagay noted that such share would be a motivating factor for the agencies.

He said it would also help in funding their operations, provided it was strictly monitored to ensure it does not go to individual pockets.

“The situation where government is having very major fund scarcity could be an easier way of funding operations, provided it is strictly control. I personally favour some percentage, may be five per cent of any fund recovered by an agency being ploughed back in that agency.

“But we have to be very careful that it’s not misused, that it’s actually ploughed back into the operations of that agency rather than going to individual pockets. So in principle, I support it and we have to work towards that,” he stated.

Professor Sagay, who said the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) has won a number of court cases in the last one year, expressed concern over some cases involving politically exposed persons.

He, however, hinted that the cases lost by the EFCC and other agencies have been appealed, while they have been working hard to ensure previous setbacks do not occur.

“In the last one year, the EFCC has won about 200 cases. So it is mainly these politically exposed persons’ cases that there have been some problems. Our response is that situations like these should be envisaged.

“All the lost cases have been appealed against, there is a rigorous review going on; both the presentation of the EFCC and the other agencies, and the actual judgement themselves to see where the problem lies, so that they are not repeated and where there was no problem, to ensure that the appeal succeeds.

“So we have to look at it generally from the point of long distance risk; there will be setbacks now and then, but the important thing is to learn from your setbacks and work hard to ensure that they are not repeated,” he explained.












Advertisement