Zuckerberg Did Not Ignore Personal Data Issues, Says Facebook Mgt

Channels Television  
Updated June 13, 2019
In this file photo taken on May 24, 2018 Facebook’s CEO Mark Zuckerberg delivers his speech during the VivaTech (Viva Technology) trade fair in Paris. PHOTO: GERARD JULIEN / AFP

 

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg did not knowingly violate an agreement with the regulator supervising the company’s management of users’ personal data, the social media giant said on Wednesday as it addressed an issue that has been under federal investigation for the past year.

Facebookwas required to provide the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) with emails, some from 2012, suggesting that Zuckerberg was personally aware of but neglected to address the fact that external applications had access to massive amounts of personal data withoutFacebookusers’ knowledge, the Wall Street Journal reported.

The newspaper added that it did not have access to the documents but that anonymous sources had described their contents.

“We have fully cooperated with the FTC’s investigation to date and provided tens of thousands of documents, emails and files,” said aFacebookspokesperson.

“At no point did Mark or any otherFacebookemployee knowingly violate the company’s obligations under the FTC consent order nor do any emails exist that indicate they did.”

The FTC reopened investigations into whetherFacebookviolated a 2011 settlement with the regulator on protecting user data following revelations last year that personal data from tens of millions of users was hijacked by the political consultancy Cambridge Analytica as it worked on Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

The 2011 court-approved agreement requiredFacebookto notify users when it shares data with third parties and bars the social network from deceptive practices.

The investigation could result in a record fine running into billions of dollars.

Despite the controversies, some 2.7 billion people use at least one of the “family” of the company’s applications, including the coreFacebooknetwork, Instagram, and messaging applications WhatsApp and Messenger.

AFP