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Brazil Football Great Carlos To Play For English Team

Channels Television  
Updated March 4, 2022
Brazilian football legend Roberto Carlos (C) scores from the penalty spot playing a friendly match for Shrewsbury and District Sunday League side “Bull in the Barne United” outside Shrewsbury in north-west England on March 4, 2022, after he was purchased by the club in an auction.  Oli SCARFF / AFP

 

Brazil and Real Madrid great Roberto Carlos will get a taste of English grassroots football when he turns out for a pub team on Friday.

The 48-year-old retired full-back will appear for Bull in the Barne United in Shrewsbury, western England after the team won a charity “Dream Transfer” raffle on eBay in January.

Carlos is set to be involved as the team face fellow Shrewsbury and District Sunday League side Harlescott Rangers in a friendly.

The Brazilian, who won the World Cup in 2002, most recently had a brief spell in India with Delhi Dynamos in 2015.

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When it was announced in January that he would be turning out for Bull in the Barne for one game, Carlos said in a statement: “I’m excited to play for Bull in the Barne in Shrewsbury, paying homage to when I nearly signed for Birmingham City in the 90s, which is very close by.

“I’ve heard that the team’s been down a number of players this season so here’s hoping my training is enough to help them up their game and bring what Bull in the Barne’s fans want to see.”

Bull in the Barne manager and goalkeeper Ed Speller said: “Roberto Carlos is one of those legends who’s inspired so many young players’ love of the game.

“My jaw absolutely dropped when we found out Bull in the Barne won the Dream Transfer and he’ll be playing alongside the team in Shrewsbury.

“It should be a right laugh for him to come see what we’re made of, with some tense free-kicks and hopefully no dodgy tackles.”

Money raised from the raffle has gone to Football Beyond Borders, a charity that helps disadvantaged young people.

AFP