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France Freezes €850 Million Of Russian Assets

Channels Television  
Updated March 20, 2022
Superyacht Solaris, owned by the Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich, which is under UK sanctions, sails towards the luxury yacht marina Porto Montenegro, near Montenegrin city of Tivat, on the Adriatic coast, on March 12, 2022. SAVO PRELEVIC / AFP
In this file photo, Superyacht Solaris, owned by the Russian oligarch Roman Abramovich, which is under UK sanctions, sails towards the luxury yacht marina Porto Montenegro, near Montenegrin city of Tivat, on the Adriatic coast, on March 12, 2022. SAVO PRELEVIC / AFP

 

France has seized around 850 million euros ($920 million) of Russian oligarchs’ assets on its soil, Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire said Sunday.

“We have immobilised … 150 million euros in individual’s accounts, credit lines in France and in French establishments, ” Le Maire told French television as Paris hits Moscow over its invasion of Ukraine.

Furthermore, “we have immobilised 539 million euros in real estate on French territory, corresponding to some 390 properties or apartments and we have sequestered two yachts (with a value of) 150 million euros,” said Le Maire.

“In total that is (almost) 850 millions euros in assets belonging to Russian oligarchs which have been immobilised on French soil,” he added.

The French crackdown means the owners are unable to, sell on or monetise their assets.

READ ALSO: Ten Million Have Fled Their Homes In Ukraine – UN

Notwithstanding, “they are not seized in the sense that the state becomes the owner and could then sell them on. For there to be seizure there has to be a penal offence”, Le Maire stipulated.

“The sanctions are hitting Russia, the state, Vladimir Putin hard,” Le Maire went on.

Since Russian began its war in Ukraine on February 24 Western states have responded with a wide-ranging package of stiff financial sanctions.

On Friday, Russia’s central bank said the extent of the sanctions would make macro economic forecasting “extremely difficult”.

Four days after the invasion began Moscow hiked its main interest rate from 9.5 to 20 percent and the response to the conflict has largely cut Russia’s financial sector off from the global economy.

AFP