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Gen Z, Millennials Were Not There But We’ve Kept June 12 Spirit Alive – APC’s Ali

Millennials, otherwise known as Generation Y, refers to people born between 1981 and 1996, while Gen Z pertains to those born in the 1997-2012 era.


A member of the Presidential Transition Committee, Ali Ali, appears on Channels Television’s special coverage of Democracy Day on Monday, June 12, 2023

 

A member of the Presidential Transition Committee, Ali Ali, says the democratic spirit of the June 12, 1993 presidential election, widely lauded as largely free and fair, has been preserved for millennials and Generation Z.

Millennials, otherwise known as Generation Y, refers to people born between 1981 and 1996, while Gen Z pertains to those born in the 1997-2012 era.

Ali shared his thoughts during a live Monday appearance on Channels Television’s special coverage for Democracy Day. 

The annual celebration commemorates the country’s democracy against the backdrop of the annulled 1993 election which saw Chief Moshood “MKO” Abiola emerge as the presumed winner under the military regime of Gen. Ibrahim Babangida (rtd.). 

Recognising the democratic struggle of the time, former President Muhammadu Buhari officially changed the date for Democracy Day from May 29 to June 12 and honoured Abiola with the highest presidential honour of Grand Commander of the Order of the Federal Republic (GCFR).

Asked whether the spirit of democracy has carried over after 30 years, Ali answered in the affirmative, though, according to him, millennial and Gen Z Nigerians were ”not there”.

“I think we have [carried the democratic spirit], in the way [we] managed to keep the spirit of June 12 alive and also further deepen the culture of democracy,” he said.

“When people talk about June 12, a lot of people, especially the Gen Z — most of them — were not there, even millennials were not there when it happened 30 years ago [witnessing] how Nigerians came together to disregard the usual sentiments.”

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The All Progressives Congress stalwart argued that Nigerians were united against “the usual suspects underlying our underbelly as a nation” and, according to him, voted for a reenactment of “the same-faith ticket” widely regarded as having won three decades ago.

“Thirty years ago, Nigeria wasn’t certainly as rancorous as the nation is now,” the PTC member said. 

“Thirty years ago, for example, social media wasn’t in the mix, and 30 years ago, it was an unwilling military junta that conducted the election that has lost legitimacy.

“And Nigerians were anxious to see the end of military rule and in came Abiola. And the Abiola/Kingigbe ticket certainly was a mismatch with the Tofa/Ugoh.”