Buhari Explains Why Nigeria Is Fighting Corruption Headlong

Muhammadu-Buhari-UN-Corruption-NigeriaPresident Muhammadu Buhari has explained why his administration is fighting the scourge of corruption headlong in Nigeria.

The President says this is because corruption contributes to the denial of the resources required for development.

He stated this on Thursday in New York at the high-level meeting of the United Nations General Assembly, to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the Declaration on the Right to Development.

Right To Development

President Buhari called on development partners to also step up the fight against corruption by returning ill-gotten financial assets and halting future illicit financial flows to their countries.

He noted that such collective action “will guarantee a stronger international defence of the right to development”.

The Nigerian leader added that illicit financial assets stashed abroad deprive developing countries including Nigeria, and invariably deny people the enjoyment of their national wealth and resources needed for development.

Muhammadu-Buhari-and-Ban-Ki-Moon
President Muhammadu Buhari and UN Secretary-General, Mr Ban Ki-Moon

He cautioned that non-repatriation of illicit financial assets could impinge on the determination of States to achieve an all-inclusive 2030 sustainable development.

The President further called on the United Nations “to remain vocal and active in addressing the negative impact of non-repatriation of illicit financial assets on their countries of origin”, adding that “as soon as stolen assets are legally established, they should swiftly be repatriated”.

He welcomed the commemoration of three decades of the Declaration on the Right to Development, which he observed, coincided with the first anniversary of the adoption of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

“It reminds us all of the essence of development and provides us with the opportunity to reaffirm commitments to converting this right into the policies and operational activities of relevant actors at the national, regional and international levels,” he said.

Lop-Sided Terms Of Trade

President Buhari noted further that as a developing country, Nigeria considers the Right to Development an inalienable right of fundamental importance, stressing that at the national level, his administration has been making strenuous efforts to ensure that the right to development is at the centre of all development initiatives.

He reaffirmed Nigeria’s commitment to the UN Charter and other international conventions that uphold the Right to Development.

The President also drew the attention of the international community to the urgent need to address the lop-sided terms of trade between developed and developing countries, which have impacted negatively on the capacity of many developing countries to embark on development programmes for the benefit of their peoples.

“Nigeria is convinced that the Right to Development is a shared responsibility considering the growing inequality and poverty resulting from climate change impact, natural disasters, violent extremism, social unrest and deprivation.

“The Right to Development must be promoted and protected like all other rights. Its universality and interdependence are indisputable,” said the President in a statement by his spokesman, Mr Femi Adesina.

3.2 Billion People At Risk Of Malaria Globally – Who Report

malaria attack The World Health Organisation (WHO), says about 3.2 billion people remain at risk to malaria attack globally.

A WHO report released on Monday on World Malaria Day entitled: “Eliminating Malaria”says that in 2015 alone, 214 million new cases of the disease were reported in 95 countries and no fewer than 400,000 people died of the disease.

The report is coming a year after the World Health Assembly resolved to eliminate malaria from at least 35 countries by 2030. The report shows the goal, although ambitious, is achievable.

In 2015, all countries in the WHO European Region reported, for the first time, zero indigenous cases of malaria, down from 90 000 cases in 1995. Outside this region, eight countries reported zero cases of the disease in 2014 – Argentina, Costa Rica, Iraq, Morocco, Oman, Paraguay, Sri Lanka and United Arab Emirates.

A statement by a spokesperson for WHO, Christian Lindmeier, said, the “Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030”, approved by the World Health Assembly in 2015, calls for the elimination of local transmission of malaria in at least 10 countries by 2020.

WHO’s estimates show that 21 countries are in a position to achieve this goal, including six countries in the African region, where the burden of the disease is heaviest.

“Our report shines a spotlight on countries that are well on their way to eliminating malaria,” the Director of the WHO Global Malaria Programme, Dr Pedro Alonso said.

“WHO commends these countries while also highlighting the urgent need for greater investment in settings with high rates of malaria transmission, particularly in Africa. Saving lives must be our first priority.”

Since the year 2000, malaria mortality rates have declined by 60% globally. In the WHO African Region, malaria mortality rates fell by 66% among all age groups and by 71% among children under five years.

WHO pointed out that reaching the goals of the “Global Technical Strategy” would require a steep increase in global and domestic funding—from $2.5 billion today to an estimated $8.7 billion annually by 2030.

“Through robust financing and political will, affected countries can speed progress towards malaria elimination and contribute to the broader development agenda as laid out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” it stressed.