EU Unveils Ethics Guidelines For Artificial Intelligence

European Union, Ogbonnaya Onu, Science and technology

 

The European Union presented ethics guidelines Monday as it seeks to promote its own artificial intelligence sector, which has fallen behind developments in China and the United States.

The European Commission, the bloc’s executive arm, unveiled a framework aimed at boosting trust in AI by ensuring, for example, data about EU citizens are not used to harm them.

“Ethical AI is a win-win proposition that can become a competitive advantage for Europe: being a leader of human-centric AI that people can trust,” Commission Vice President Andrus Ansip said.

The guidelines list seven key requirements for “trustworthy AI” established by independent experts consulted by the Commission.

Among them is one ensuring that data about citizens will not be used to harm them or to discriminate against them.

The measures also call for mechanisms to ensure accountability for AI systems and for AI algorithms to be secure and reliable enough to deal with errors or inconsistencies.

The Commission now aims to launch a pilot phase in which industry, research, and public authorities test the list of key requirements.

It will also involve companies from other countries and international organisations.

The Commission aims to improve cooperation with “like-minded partners” such as Japan, Canada or Singapore and continue working with the G7 and G20 groups of leading economies.

The updated guidelines flow from the Commission’s AI strategy unveiled in April last year, which aimed to bring public and private investment in the sector to at least 20 billion euros annually over the next decade.

Europe is trying to catch up with both the US and China.

A study published last month showed that China is poised to overtake the United States in artificial intelligence with a surge in academic research on the key technology.

A burgeoning sector, AI is already used to recognise people in photos, filter unwanted content from online platforms and enable cars to drive themselves.

Google Launches AI-Driven Audio News Feed

(File) A Google sign is seen on November 1, 2018, in New York.  Bryan R. Smith / AFP

 

Google said Thursday it was launching a radio-style, on-demand audio news feed available on smart speakers, personalized with the help of artificial intelligence.

The technology giant said it had partnerships with more than a dozen news organizations to deliver an audio feed in the same manner as its smartphone news feed.

“This new experience will bring you an audio news playlist assembled in that moment, for you,” Google product manager Liz Gannes said in a blog post.

“It starts with a briefing of top stories and updates on topics you care about, and extends into longer-form content that dives deeper into more stories.”

Google Assistant, the AI program developed by the company, will manage the feed, allowing users to skip a story, go back or stop.

The project aims to transform audio news into a Netflix-like experience, available on demand with personalized recommendations.

“For the past century, radio has been a one-size-fits-all medium,” Gannes wrote.

“Turn on the radio and you’re dropped into a show at a moment in time — regardless of what you already know, where you are, or what you’re interested in.

“Imagine instead if you could have your own radio, one that’s available on-demand, accessible throughout your day, and brings you news about the world and your interests.”

The new project builds on Google’s existing efforts to deliver news over its speakers and smartphones, and comes amid a broad effort by news organizations and tech firms to develop more voice services.

The audio news feature will roll out first to a limited number of people using the Google Assistant in the United States in English, the company said.

AFP

Amnesty International Accuses Both Insurgents And Security Agencies Of War Crimes

amnesty internationalRights group, Amnesty International (AI) has said that both the Nigerian security agencies and the Boko Haram insurgents have committed war crimes in the troubled north-eastern part of the country.

A statement issued by the group says that more than 1,500 people had been killed in the first three months of 2014, and that the situation in the north-east region has escalated into a non-international armed conflict.

Amnesty added that it has documented the killings carried out in January, February and March 2014 by both Boko Haram and the Nigerian security forces.

Part of the statement reads, “AI has received credible evidence that as the military regained control, more than 600 people, mostly unarmed recaptured detainees, were extra-judicially executed in various locations across Maiduguri.”

The rights group is asking the international community to ensure prompt, independent investigations into acts that might constitute war crimes and crimes against humanity.