COVID-19: Airlines Lose N17bn Monthly – Sirika

 

The Minister of Aviation, Hadi Sirika, has stated that the sector has been the worst hit since the COVID-19 pandemic ravaged the country.

According to him, airlines have lost nearly N17 billion monthly since their operations were grounded, as part of efforts to curb the spread of the virus.

“We are in very difficult moments like everyone else. All of this started because someone travelled and unfortunately came back home with it and the consequence is what we’ve been going through.

“We are the worst hit, than any other sector. Some N17 billion monthly is being lost by the airlines, thanks to COVID-19,” the minister said during the Presidential Task Force briefing on COVID-19 in Abuja on Wednesday.

Read Also: Chartered Plane Conveying Nigerians To Lagos From Dubai Makes U-Turn

Speaking further, Sirika noted that the sector is highly regulated and very co-ordinated and has set standards that must be followed at all times, regardless, because it speaks to safety.

This, according to him, would mean that “we will not be able to open up after closing for several weeks and perhaps for some months”.

“There are safety issues and concerns. Those airplanes have been kept and when we are going to bring them back into service, we will have to ensure that they are airworthy and that they can make those flights safely,” he added.

“So also, for the flight crew, they have certain standards they must conform with. They have licencing issues which will fall due for recurrency to be done within this period, so what do you do with them.

“Certainly they won’t just pick up their bags and continue where they left. They must conform to those standards and ensure that they are safe to operate both in terms of their health and their proficiency to be able to conduct a very safe flight”.

South Africa To Replace SAA With ‘New National Carrier’

This file photo taken on May 25, 2010, shows a South African Airways plane parked in a bay on the tarmac at the Johannesburg O.R Tambo International airport in Johannesburg, Gianluigi GUERCIA / AFP

 

South Africa’s cash-strapped national carrier will be replaced by a new airline after years of mismanagement and debt, the government said Friday, as plans for its rescue have been marred by the coronavirus outbreak.

South African Airways (SAA) was placed under a state-approved turnaround plan in December as a last-ditch resort to save the company from total collapse.

All its flights have been grounded since South Africa closed its borders and went into a five-week nationwide lockdown in March to curb the spread of COVID-19.

Last month, the government turned down a request for 10 billion rand ($531 million) of extra funding by SAA’s business administrators, claiming resources had been stretched by the pandemic.

The ministry of public enterprises on Friday said a “new and bold approach” would be required for South Africa to maintain a competitive airlift capacity after the “fog of economic uncertainty” caused by coronavirus.

“The creation of a new, dynamic airline, with the correct corporate structure… will allow for the new SAA to compete in the post-COVID-19 world,” said the ministry in a statement.

“The new national carrier will be well-positioned to take to the skies again and contribute to the South African and African economy.”

No clear timeline was given for the creation of the “new restructured airline” that will involve both public and private participation.

According to the ministry, it will be funded by a range of parties that will allow the state to “continue to play a key role”.

SAA employs more than 5,000 workers and is Africa’s second-largest airline after Ethiopian Airlines.

Like most South African state-owned enterprises (SOEs), it has failed to make a profit for more than a decade and survives on government bailouts.

“The transition to the new airline may require sacrifices,” the statement said, adding that employees “may be displaced”.

To date South Africa has recorded at least 5,647 coronavirus cases — the highest in Africa — including 103 deaths.

Some confinement measures were lifted on Friday and economic activity is slowly beginning to resume in certain sectors.

But Transport Minister Fikile Mbalula on Friday said it was still too early to think of ending air travel restrictions.

AFP

India To Ground Domestic Passenger Flights Over Coronavirus

Vehicles are stopped by policemen at a checkpoint at the Uttar Pradesh and Delhi border to inforce a lockdown order in some districts by Uttar Pradesh’s government as a preventive measure against the spread of the COVID-19 novel coronavirus, in Ghazipur on March 23, 2020. Prakash SINGH / AFP.

 

India will ground all domestic passenger flights from Wednesday to combat the spread of the novel coronavirus, the government said, as more states ordered lockdowns.

India has already banned incoming international flights and sealed most of its land borders.

The government information bureau said only cargo flights will be allowed.

Domestic Indian carriers carried some 144 million passengers last year.

“Covid-19 pandemic is crippling the global economy and aviation including India’s once-booming aviation sector for years to come,” Devesh Agarwal, the editor of the Bangalore Aviation website, told AFP.

“This is not a short-term pandemic and the outlook for Indian aviation looks tragic. The aviation sector in India is decimated right now. This is similar worldwide.”

READ ALSO: COVID-19: Spain Death Toll Surpasses 2,000 After 462 Die In 24 Hours

International traffic to the financial capital Mumbai had also fallen more than 55 percent in the month of March amid the increasing flight restrictions,” a Mumbai Airport spokeswoman told AFP.

India has reported seven virus deaths from more than 400 cases, but infections have risen sharply in recent days.

Hundreds of millions of Indians were ordered locked down Sunday in the world’s second-most populous nation.

AFP

Emirates To Suspend All Passenger Flights From March 25

(FILES) A photo taken on September 24, 2019 shows an Airbus A380 of the Emirates airline during landing at the airport in Duesseldorf, western Germany. – Dubai carrier Emirates Airline announced on March 22, 2020 it will suspend all passenger flights from March 25 amid the novel coronavirus outbreak. “Today we made the decision to temporarily suspend all passenger flights by 25 March 2020,” the airline said on Twitter. The United Arab Emirates announced on Friday the first two deaths from the COVID-19 disease in the country. Ina FASSBENDER / AFP.

 

Dubai carrier Emirates announced on Sunday it will suspend all passenger flights from March 25 amid the novel coronavirus outbreak.

“By Wednesday 25 March, although we will still operate cargo flights, which remain busy, Emirates will have temporarily suspended all its passenger operations,” the airline’s chairman and CEO Sheikh Ahmed bin Saeed Al-Maktoum said in a statement.

“We continue to watch the situation closely, and as soon as things allow, we will reinstate our services.”

Emirates passenger flights normally serve 159 destinations.

The United Arab Emirates on Friday announced its first two deaths from the COVID-19 disease, having reported 153 infections so far, of which 38 people have recovered.

Maktoum said that, until January this year, the Emirates Group was “doing well” against current financial year targets, but “COVID-19 has brought all that to a sudden and painful halt over the past six weeks”.

READ ALSO: Australia Announces Nearly $40bn In Virus Relief

“The world has literally gone into quarantine due to the COVID-19 outbreak,” he said.

The airline also said it will slash basic salaries — by between 25 and 50 percent — of a majority of employees for three months, but will not cut jobs.

“Rather than ask employees to leave the business, we chose to implement a temporary basic salary cut as we want to protect our workforce,” said Maktoum. “We want to avoid cutting jobs.”

The disease first emerged in China in late December and was declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization earlier this month.

Gulf countries have imposed various restrictions to combat the spread of the virus, particularly in the air transport sector.

The UAE has stopped granting visas on arrival and forbidden foreigners who are legal residents but are outside the country from returning.

AFP

Airlines Need Up To $200 bn In Emergency Aid – IATA

 

 

Up to $200 billion is needed to rescue the world’s airlines during the coronavirus crisis, the global aviation association said Thursday, appealing especially to African and Middle Eastern countries to provide emergency assistance.

“Support measures are urgently needed,” the International Air Transport Association said in a statement, adding that “on a global basis, IATA estimates that emergency aid of up to $200 billion is required”.

Airlines worldwide face an unprecedented existential threat as the COVID-19 pandemic, which has killed more than 9,000 people around the world, shuts down global travel.

“Stopping the spread of COVID-19 is the top priority of governments,” IATA chief Alexandre de Juniac said in the statement.

“But they must be aware that the public health emergency has now become a catastrophe for economies and for aviation,” he said, pointing out that “the scale of the current industry crisis is much worse and far more widespread than 9/11, SARS or the 2008 global financial crisis.”

“Airlines are fighting for survival,” he said, warning that “millions of jobs are at stake.”

IATA expressed particular concern for the situation in Africa and the Middle East, where many routes have been suspended, and where demand has fallen by as much of 60 percent on the remaining routes.

READ ALSO: Tokyo Olympics May Be Postponed Due To Covid-19 – Athletics Chief

It pointed out that the air transport industry’s economic contribution in Africa alone is estimated at $55.8 billion, supporting 6.2 million jobs and contributing 2.6 percent of the continent’s gross domestic product (GDP).

In the Middle East, the contribution stands at $130 billion, some 4.4 percent of GDP, supporting 2.4 million jobs, it said.

“Airlines need urgent government action if they are to emerge from this in a fit state to help the world recover, once COVID-19 is beaten,” Juniac said.

Carriers across Africa and the Middle East had begun implementing extensive cost-cutting measures to mitigate the financial impact of the pandemic, IATA said, but warned that airlines in the regions on average held enough cash reserves for approximately two months.

“Due to flight bans as well as international and regional travel restrictions, airlines’ revenues are plummeting (and) outstripping the scope of even the most drastic cost containment measures,” it said.

IATA called on governments to provide support in various ways, including through direct financial aid to passenger and cargo carriers, loans and loan guarantees and tax relief.

AFP

Global Airlines Slash Almost All Flights As Coronavirus Spreads

 

An airport cleaning staff, wearing a respiratory mask (C), controls baskets at Rome’s Fiumicino international airport March 13, 2020. – Rome’s Ciampino airport will shut to passenger flights from March 13, authorities said, with a Terminal T1 also closing at the city’s main Fiumicino facility next week as airlines slash flights to Italy over the coronavirus outbreak. Andreas SOLARO / AFP.

 

Major world airlines on Monday axed almost all flights on a temporary basis as the worsening coronavirus crisis sparks travel bans, ravages demand and sends shares into freefall, triggering pleas to help carriers survive.

IAG, owner of British Airways and Spanish carrier Iberia, announced it would slash flight capacity by 75 percent during April and May owing to the COVID-19 outbreak.

The London-based carrier’s share price crashed nearly 27 percent in mid-afternoon deals.

Other airlines tumbled, with Germany’s Lufthansa erasing almost 11 percent in value and Air France wiping out 17 percent on similar announcements.

Britain’s Virgin Atlantic added that it has decided to park 75 percent of its total fleet — and in April this will rise as high as 85 percent.

Virgin has reportedly called upon the UK government to inject emergency support totalling 7.5 billion pounds ($9.2 billion, 8.3 billion euros) to help keep Britain’s aviation industry flying.

In Germany, Lufthansa has been forced to scrap around two thirds of its flights in coming weeks as several countries including the United States ban travellers from Europe.

– ‘Deteriorating at pace’ –

“Last week saw a rapid acceleration of the impact of COVID-19 on global aviation and tourism,” Virgin Atlantic warned in a statement.

“The situation is deteriorating at pace and the airline has seen several days of negative bookings, driven by a huge volume of cancellations as customers choose to stay at home.”

British no-frills carrier EasyJet warned it may have to ground “the majority” of its fleet, urging governments across Europe to help their airlines maintain access to liquidity.

EasyJet CEO Johan Lundgren added: “European aviation faces a precarious future and it is clear that coordinated government backing will be required to ensure the industry survives and is able to continue to operate when the crisis is over.”

Irish budget carrier Ryanair meanwhile did not rule out a full grounding as it unveiled stinging flight cutbacks.

As part of its drastic action, IAG said it was “cutting non-essential and non-cyber related IT spend, freezing recruitment and discretionary spending, implementing voluntary leave options, temporarily suspending employment contracts and reducing working hours”.

IAG added that a management shake-up had been put on hold, noting that Willie Walsh would remain as chief executive.

Walsh had been due to step down on March 26, to be replaced by Iberia CEO Luis Gallego.

Air France will meanwhile slash flight capacity by 70-90 percent over the next two months, while Austrian Airlines will suspend all flights from Thursday, and Finnair is cutting 90 percent of capacity until the situation improves.

The German government on Monday said it is planning to shield companies from going under because of the pandemic, by suspending legal obligations for firms facing acute liquidity problems to file for bankruptcy.

German tourism and hotel group TUI said it was applying for state aid to keep it afloat, as it suspended the “majority” of its operations.

– ‘This is not 2008’ –

Back in London, a spokesman for British Prime Minister Boris Johnson signalled that the government would examine help for affected businesses, not just airlines, via Her Majesty’s Revenue and Customs (HMRC) — which is Britain’s tax authority.

“HMRC is ready to help all businesses including airlines experiencing temporary financial difficulties due to coronavirus,” Johnson’s spokesman told AFP.

Stephen Innes, markets strategist at AxiCorp, drew a contrast with the global financial crisis which sparked bank bailouts.

However, as G7 finance ministers prepare to discuss the crisis later Monday, Innes argued that airlines were not the only strategic companies calling for assistance this time.

“This is not 2008. Back then it was the banks, this time the banks’ balance sheets are fine,” Innes said.

“But this is a global economic crisis which needs swap lines to airline companies, oil companies and retailers .

“Airlines might be at the top of the list for directed fiscal help, but virtually every global industry is facing pressure without a government bailout,” he added.

– US cutbacks –

US airlines have also announced drastic reductions in flights after President Donald Trump’s administration banned foreign travellers arriving from Europe.

United Airlines said it would announce a cut in capacity of around 50 percent for April and May, as the United States ramps up restrictions to try and contain the spread of the coronavirus.

“We also now expect these deep cuts to extend into the summer travel period,” said United chief executive Oscar Munoz in a letter to employees published Sunday.

American Airlines said it would reduce all international capacity by 75 percent, while competitors Delta and Southwest Airlines plan to strip back flights.

AFP

Coronavirus: NCAA Orders Airlines To Issue Health Forms To Passengers

FG Sacks Directors Of NCAA

 

The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority (NCAA) has asked all airlines operating international and regional flights into the country to issue health declaration forms to their passengers, including crew members before arriving at Nigerian airports.

NCAA’s General Manager (Public Relations), Sam Adurogboye, disclosed this in a statement on Thursday.

This comes on the heels of the failure of some airlines operating international and regional flights into Nigeria to provide health declaration forms, also known as passengers’ self-reporting forms, to their customers.

Adurogboye stated that the NCAA has issued a letter to that effect to all airlines and other stakeholders.

“In view of the above, airlines are to remind passengers to provide factual address and phone numbers to enhance contact tracing in case there is a need to do so,” he said.

The agency’s spokesman explained that the health declaration forms would be collected and evaluated by the personnel of the Port Health Services on the arrival of the passengers and crew members.

He added that the collected health forms would be returned to the airlines by the Port Health Services at the various international airports of the country.

Adurogboye warned that failure to comply with the directive of the NCAA by any airline would attract severe sanctions.

Delta, American Airlines Suspend Several Flights Over Coronavirus

FILES) In this file photo taken on February 21, 2013, a Delta Airlines jet takes off from Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport.  KAREN BLEIER / AFP

 

Delta Airlines and American Airlines are temporarily suspending some flights between US airports and Milan because of the spread of the novel coronavirus in parts of Italy, the two carriers announced.   

Delta is suspending flights between New York’s busy John F. Kennedy International Airport and Milan Malpensa, the largest airport in northern Italy and a major hub for Alitalia, the airline said in a statement Sunday.

Delta’s last New York-to-Milan flight will take off Monday, while the last flight in the opposite direction is scheduled for Tuesday. Service is set to resume on May 1 or 2.

Delta added that flights between Rome and Atlanta were not affected.

American Airlines said late Saturday that it was suspending service between New York and Milan as well as between Miami and Milan until April 25, citing a “reduction in demand.”

Both airlines said passengers will have a choice of rebooking on a later flight or being reimbursed.

US authorities on Saturday asked Americans not to travel to the areas in Italy and South Korea hardest-hit by the virus.

Both Delta and American, as well as the third big US carrier, United Airlines, had previously reduced or suspended service to China, where the epidemic broke out in late December, as well as to several other Asian countries.

As of Sunday at 17h00 GMT, the number of cases of coronavirus in the world stood at 88,257, including 2,996 deaths, in 66 countries and territories, according to a tally compiled by AFP from official sources.

Italy has reported 1,694 cases and 34 deaths. The biggest cluster of cases is in the Lombardy region in the country’s north.

AFP

‘Ethiopian Airlines Believes In Boeing’ Despite Crash, Says CEO

Rescue team walk past collected bodies in bags at the crash site of Ethiopia Airlines near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on March 10, 2019. Michael TEWELDE / AFP

 

Ethiopian Airlines “believes in” Boeing despite the crash of a Boeing 737 MAX 8 plane that killed all 157 people on board and led to the model’s grounding, the carrier’s CEO said on Monday.

“Let me be clear: Ethiopian Airlines believes in Boeing. They have been a partner of ours for many years,” Tewolde GebreMariam wrote in a statement.

Flight ET 302 crashed on March 10 just minutes into its flight to Nairobi.

It was the second disaster for the 737 MAX 8 since the October crash of an Indonesian Lion Air Jet that killed all 189 passengers and crew. Aviation regulators responded by grounding the model around the world.

READ ALSO: Crashed Ethiopian Airlines Black Box Recovered

Ethiopia’s transport minister has said “clear similarities” exist between the two crashes based on an analysis of black box data, without giving further details.

Tewolde called for the 737 MAX 8’s grounding after the crash, but in the Monday statement struck a conciliatory tone towards the American plane manufacturer whose models make up the majority of the Ethiopian fleet.

“Despite the tragedy, Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines will continue to be linked well into the future,” he said.

AFP

Airlines To Step Up Fight Against Human Trafficking

International Air Transport Association (IATA) chief executive Alexandre de Juniac speaks at the opening of the annual meeting of global airlines in Sydney on June 4, 2018.  PETER PARKS / AFP

 

Airlines are set to step up the fight against human trafficking, global industry body IATA said Monday as it released guidelines on how crews can act as “eyes and ears” to identify and report suspected cases.

Human trafficking is the world’s fastest-growing criminal industry and the second-largest after the drug trade, according to the US State Department, and there is an increasing push for the aviation industry to take action.

“Many individual airlines are already involved and have launched anti-human trafficking initiatives,” IATA’s assistant director for external affairs Tim Colehan told reporters at the group’s annual meeting in Sydney.

“But until recently there has been no industry-wide initiative.”

Some 60 percent of human trafficking involves crossing an international border, according to the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC).

The new guidelines will include checklists on how to identify suspected cases and handle victims after landing.

“Cabin crew are in a unique position as they travel with passengers sometimes for many hours and are able to spot even the smallest signals and behaviours,” the IATA said.

The approach also involves coordination with airports and law enforcement agencies such as border and customs agents.

Colehan added that while the extent of human trafficking within the aviation sector was not known, new and emerging legislation around the world required airlines to provide specific training to cabin crew.

The clear link between human traffic and international terrorism, according to recent research, meant that airlines’ efforts to reduce the criminal activity could deter terrorism within the aviation industry, he said.

The International Labour Organisation estimates that almost 25 million people are victims of modern slavery.

Types of trafficking activities that the guidelines identify include prostitution, child soldiers, organ removal, forced labour, debt bondage and forced marriage.

Key transregional flows include from sub-Saharan Africa to the Middle East and western and southern Europe, and from South Asia to the Middle East and East Asia and the Pacific, according to UNODC.

AFP

Dana Air was not indicted for any wrongdoing – Aviation Minister

Re-visiting the Dana Air re-instatement by the authorities, Nigerians reacted sharply towards the move as Nigerians expressed shock and surprise in a vox-pop done by the ‘Station of the Decade’ to sample the opinion of Nigerians about the re-instatement of the Dana Air.

The Minister of Aviation; Stella Oduah was our guest on Sunrise daily this morning as she reacted to the lifting of the ban saying the ban was something that was not supposed to be done in the first place as it not an aviation practice as it has laws and procedures guiding the sector internationally.

She said further that the panel that was set for the technical and administrative audit for Dana Air and other airlines have completed their reports and Dana Air was not indicted for any wrongdoing.

NCAA Proposed Rules:Airlines asked to review schedules to delays

In the area of flight delays from airlines,the NCAA decided to step in as passengers can begin to heave a sigh of relief.

The Nigerian Civial Aviation Authority asked airlines to reduce their frequencies when necessary to avoid this recurring situation.