Bruno Mars Pokes Fun At Indonesia Song Restrictions In Cheeky Tweet

Photo source: Wikimedia Commons

 

Bruno Mars has launched a cheeky Twitter protest over Indonesia’s most populous province slapping restrictions on some of his biggest hits — and poked fun at fellow music megastar Ed Sheeran in the process.

The West Java broadcasting commission ruled this month that some 17 foreign songs could only be played on the airwaves between 10 pm and 3 am, citing morality concerns.

Restricted titles include Grammy award winner Mars’ “That’s what I like” and “Versace on the Floor”, Ed Sheeran’s megahit “Shape of You” and Ariana Grande’s “Love Me Harder”.

“WTF! I was poppin in Indonesia! Then here comes @edsheeran with his sick, perverted lyrics, gettin us all pinched! Thanks Ed. Thanks a lot,” the funk revivalist said to his 42 million Twitter followers this week.

Separately, Indonesia is drafting a national law that seeks to ban blasphemous and “pornographic” music content, sparking concerns about freedom of expression in the world’s biggest Muslim majority nation.

Responding to the American singer’s tweet, broadcast commission chief Dedeh Fardiah said Mars “maybe didn’t understand the context” of the new rules.

The commission, she said, responded to complaints from local residents in West Java, which has some 48 million people and is one of Indonesia’s most conservative provinces.

“After a review, we think the (restricted) songs’ lyrics indeed violate the rules which say programmes cannot air material (between 3am and 10pm) which has sexual and obscene content, or implies sexual activity,” Fardiah told AFP.

Foreign artists have occasionally found themselves in the cross-hairs of religious conservatives or fallen afoul of Indonesia’s censors.

Last year, a TV ad featuring members of K-pop supergroup Blackpink dressed in miniskirts was banned because the national Broadcasting Commission deemed it indecent.

Bruno Mars Grammy Award Sweep Sparks Criticisms

Recording artist Bruno Mars, winner of the Record of the Year award for ’24K Magic,’ Album Of The Year award for ’24K Magic,’ Song of the Year award for ‘That’s What I Like,’ Best R&B Performance award for ‘That’s What I Like,’ and Best R&B Album album for ’24K Magic,’ and production team pose in the press room during the 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards at Madison Square Garden on January 28, 2018 in New York City. PHOTO: Michael Loccisano / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFP

After a tumultuous political year, the Grammys took a stand for the rights of women and immigrants — but the top awards went to a singer whose mind is on sex, booze and parties.

The surprise sweep by Bruno Mars has renewed criticism in quarters that the music industry’s premier prizes are out of touch with the wider world, but for fans of the retro R&B and funk star, he is an undisputed talent who provides exactly the type of joy the world needs right now.

The Recording Academy, the group of 13,000 professionals who vote for the awards, had seemed set to change the narrative this year, with hip-hop for the first time dominating the nominations.

But rap mogul Jay-Z, who led with eight nominations, left New York’s Madison Square Garden empty-handed. Kendrick Lamar, who has given musical voice to the Black Lives Matter movement, for the second time swept the rap awards but was shut out in the general categories.

During the televised broadcast, President Donald Trump was skewered, stars defended immigrants facing deportation and Kesha’s powerful performance punctuated the growing #MeToo movement to end sexual harassment.

The singer, who fought her label to stop working with a producer she says raped her, delivered her autobiographical song “Praying” with palpable ferocity.

But Kesha was also passed over for awards, with “Praying” edged out for Best Pop Solo Performance by Ed Sheeran’s “Shape of You” about putting the moves on a woman at a bar.

– ‘Least threatening artist’ –

Mars won Album and Record of the Year for “24K Magic,” whose title track speaks of the sight of hot women “waking up the rocket” in his pants, and Song of the Year for “That’s What I Like” about making love in high style.

His victory triggered an avalanche of social media postings questioning whether Mars really represented 2017 in music.

The satirical site The Onion summed up much of the criticism with the headline: “Bruno Mars Takes Home Coveted ‘Least Threatening Artist’ Award.”

Justin Vernon of experimental rockers Bon Iver, who won the Best New Artist Grammy in 2012, wrote on Twitter that while Mars had a “fun voice,” the singer “made a name in the INDUSTRY by making hits OUT of hits of yesteryear.”

Others faulted the Grammys for snubbing “Despacito,” the most-streamed track in history.

At a precarious time for Spanish-speaking immigrants as well as hurricane-hit Puerto Rico, “Despacito” would have been the first non-English song to take a top Grammy since the very first awards in 1959.

The fate of “Despacito” entered the political arena, with Democratic Senator Bob Menendez tweeting that the song by Puerto Ricans Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee was “robbed.”

– Proud of roots –

But Mars, whose real name is Peter Hernandez, does not lend to a simple narrative. He is himself partially Puerto Rican and also has Jewish, Filipino and Spanish ancestry.

The 32-year-old from Hawaii in an interview last year with Latina magazine voiced pride in his Puerto Rican heritage and suggested that he took a stage name to avoid being pigeon-holed as a Latin artist.

He has rarely spoken overtly about politics, instead of explaining that he sees music’s power to excite and unite.

Alisha Lola Jones, an assistant professor of ethnomusicology at Indiana University, said Mars deserved praise for acknowledging his debt to R&B and funk greats rather than appropriating them.

At the Grammys, Mars credited towering African American songwriters Babyface, Jimmy Jam, Terry Lewis and Teddy Riley for inspiring him.

Many scholars of African American culture “actually appreciate that as he draws from the tradition, he’s telling us the history,” Jones said.

“African American tradition does not always have to protest. Folks who are true to the tradition do as Bruno Mars suggests, which is get people up and moving.”

But she said that Mars’s high-energy dance routines could be an easier sell at the Grammys than Lamar, who put on a symbolism-rich performance with camouflage-clad dancers dropping to the ground to simulated bullets.

Mars “does a palatable music industry performance that folks can digest, where Kendrick Lamar, in contrast, has folks on edge,” she said.

Another possibility for Mars’s victory is that with multiple hip-hop stars in competition, he benefited from a split in the vote.

Recording Academy president Neil Portnow hinted at that theory, telling reporters: “When you look at five nominations (in a category), the math of how that works out and who votes for whom is a little unpredictable.”

Whatever the reason, the Grammys also face another issue. Initial figures from Nielsen said that 19.8 million people watched the show, a drop of more than one quarter from last year and the lowest in a decade.

AFP

FULL LIST: Grammy Winners In Key Categories

Recording artist Bruno Mars wins of Album of the Year for ’24K Magic’ at the 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards at Madison Square Garden on January 28, 2018, in New York City. PHOTO: Christopher Polk / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFP

Retro R&B star Bruno Mars was the surprise big winner Sunday at the Grammy Awards, with a clean sweep of the top awards including Album, Record and Song of the Year, and six overall.

Rapper Kendrick Lamar took home five Grammys on a night that featured powerful #MeToo moments, especially from Kesha, who delivered a searing performance of her song “Praying,” about her struggles with former producer Dr Luke.

Mars won all of the awards for which he was nominated.

More than 13,000 music professionals in the Recording Academy voted to determine the winners of the Grammys, which were handed out in New York at Madison Square Garden.

Here is a list of winners in key categories:

Album of the Year: Bruno Mars, “24K Magic”

Record of the Year (for overall performance of a song): Bruno Mars, “24K Magic”

Song of the Year (for songwriting): Bruno Mars along with songwriters Brody Brown, James Fauntleroy and Philip Lawrence and production team The Stereotypes, “That’s What I Like”

Best New Artist: Alessia Cara

Best Pop Vocal Album: Ed Sheeran, “Divide”

Best Pop Solo Performance: Ed Sheeran, “Shape of You”

Best Rap Album: Kendrick Lamar, “DAMN.”

Best Rap Song: Kendrick Lamar, “HUMBLE.”

Best Rap Performance: Kendrick Lamar, “HUMBLE.”

Best Rap/Sung Performance: Kendrick Lamar featuring Rihanna, “LOYALTY.”

Best R&B Album: Bruno Mars, “24K Magic”

Best R&B Song: Bruno Mars, “That’s What I Like”

Best R&B Performance: Bruno Mars, “That’s What I Like”

Best Rock Album: The War on Drugs, “A Deeper Understanding”

Best Rock Performance: Leonard Cohen, “You Want It Darker”

Best Alternative Music Album: The National, “Sleep Well Beast”

Best World Music Album: Ladysmith Black Mambazo, “Shaka Zulu Revisited: 30th Anniversary Celebration”

Best Dance/Electronic Album: Kraftwerk, “3-D The Catalogue”

Best Music Video: Kendrick Lamar, “HUMBLE.”

Best Country Album: Chris Stapleton, “From a Room, Volume 1”

AFP

Bruno Mars Surprises With Grammy Awards Sweep

Recording artist Bruno Mars, winner of the Record of the Year award for ’24K Magic,’ Album Of The Year award for ’24K Magic,’ Song of the Year award for ‘That’s What I Like,’ Best R&B Performance award for ‘That’s What I Like,’ and Best R&B Album album for ’24K Magic,’ poses in the press room during the 60th Annual GRAMMY Awards at Madison Square Garden on January 28, 2018 in New York City. PHOTO: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for NARAS/AFP

Bruno Mars, who has revived retro funk and R&B for a new generation, on Sunday swept the Grammy Awards in a surprise snub for the hip-hop world, which had hoped for a major breakthrough on the music industry’s biggest night. 

The industry seized on its annual gala to rally on behalf of the growing women’s movement against sexual harassment, with pop singer Kesha delivering a fierce performance about her own abuse story.

But for the awards, the feel-good Mars carried the night.

He won the top prize, Album of the Year, for “24K Magic” as well as Record of the Year, which recognizes top tune, for the title track — a tale of good times with beautiful women set to 1980s-style synths and rhythms.

The Recording Academy, the body of 13,000 music professionals, also gave him Song of the Year, which awards songwriting, for another track on the album — “That’s What I Like,” an old-school ode to making love in high style.

The 32-year-old singer, sporting a bright smile and sunglasses, recalled how he first performed as a child for tourists in his native Hawaii.

“I remember seeing it firsthand — people dancing that had never met each other from two sides of the globe, dancing with each other, toasting with each other, celebrating together,” he said.

“All I wanted to do with this album was that,” he told thousands of industry players at Madison Square Garden in New York, where the Grammys temporarily shifted after 15 years in Los Angeles.

– Anti-climax for rap –

Mars won all of the awards for which he was in the running on what was expected to be a major night for hip-hop, which for the first time dominated nominations for the major categories.

But the industry either preferred Mars or the vote for rappers split.

Hip-hop mogul Jay-Z, who had led with eight nominations, ended the night empty-handed.

Kendrick Lamar for the second time swept all rap categories but failed to win the general prizes.

His five awards included Best Rap Album for “DAMN.,” a turn to a classic hip-hop sound.

Lamar opened the televised gala with a frenetic show, spitting out his verses as he was joined by U2 frontman Bono amid a sea of kung fu dancers who later fell to the ground as if struck by bullets.

– No longer ‘pretend-winning’ in shower  –

Alessia Cara, who rose from making YouTube videos in her bedroom to becoming a socially conscious pop singer, won the closely watched award of Best New Artist.

“I’ve been pretend-winning Grammys since I was a kid in my shower,” the 21-year-old from suburban Toronto told the gala.

“I just wanted to encourage everyone to support real music and real artists because everyone deserves the same shot,” Cara added.

Cara has quickly found her voice as a singer with singles such as “Here,” which describes the dread of forced emotions at a party, and “Scars to Your Beautiful,” a call for healthy body image.

– Rallying for women –

Amid rising attention to gender discrimination in the entertainment industry following revelations of sexual misconduct by Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein, top stars — notably Lady Gaga — walked the red carpet wearing white roses in solidarity with abuse victims and in an appeal for equality.

Kesha — whose pleas to break a deal with her producer, whom she accused of rape, initially fell on deaf ears in the industry — brought some audience members to tears with her deeply personal song “Praying.”

Her face intense and her voice ferocious, Kesha sang the autobiographical lyrics: “After everything you’ve done / I can thank you for how strong I have become.”

A clutch of female vocalists including Cyndi Lauper offered her both symbolic and literal support, with Kesha embracing the group in a bear-hug as she finished.

Singer Janelle Monae, introducing Kesha, said that the music industry needed to address its own abuse problems.

“To those who would dare try and silence us, we offer you two words: Time’s Up!” Monae said, using a slogan for the movement launched on New Year’s Day by hundreds of prominent women in the entertainment industry.

Rapper Logic added his own voice later on stage, telling women: “Stand tall and crush all predators under the weight of your heart that is full of the love they will never take away from you.”

The Grammys also featured a tribute to music fans killed in attacks in Las Vegas and Manchester last year with country stars Eric Church, Maren Morris and Brothers Osbourne together performing Eric Clapton’s mournful “Tears in Heaven.”

– Trump skewered –

The Grammys didn’t hold back from more light-hearted political commentary.

Noting President Donald Trump’s reported disdain for reading — and the Grammy award for spoken word — host James Corden introduced a video of famous names reciting from “Fire and Fury: Inside The Trump White House,” the sensational account of the tycoon-turned-president’s first year in office.

Musicians known for their criticism of Trump started reading from the book including John Legend, Cher and — smoking from his trademark joint — Snoop Dogg.

The video ends with Hillary Clinton, who lost to Trump in the bitter 2016 election.

“The Grammy’s in the bag,” quips Clinton, whose confidence during her race against Trump proved ill-advised.

AFP

Bruno Mars, Drake Top American Music Awards Nominations

Photo source: Wikimedia Commons

Bruno Mars, Drake and Ed Sheeran led nominations Thursday for the American Music Awards, where for the first time no women were vying for the top prize.

In the televised gala, set for November 19 in Los Angeles, winners are determined by fan voting, unlike the more prestigious Grammy Awards, which is based on polling of music industry players.

No women were in the running for Artist of the Year for the first time since the category took its current form in 2002.

Funk revivalist Bruno Mars and English songwriter Ed Sheeran were nominated for Artist of the Year as well as Video of the Year for their respective hits “That’s What I Like” and “Shape of You.”

Other nominees for Artist of the Year included Drake — who was also in the running in both the pop/rock and rap fields — and rapper Kendrick Lamar, as well as electronic duo The Chainsmokers.

– ‘Missed opportunity’ –

Halsey — the 23-year-old rising star who sang on The Chainsmokers’ blockbuster hit “Closer,” a song nominated in two categories — was among artists who voiced dismay at the lack of female representation.

“Really honoured to have received an @AMAs nomination but really disappointed to hear near exclusively male names… such a missed opportunity,” she wrote to her 6.4 million Twitter followers.

“So many incredible female artists have released this year. Hoping the coming award shows give them the credit that is due to them,” she tweeted.

Another closely watched category, New Artist of the Year, had one woman among the nominees, pop singer Julia Michaels.

Other nominees were former One Direction heartthrob Niall Horan, British singer and fellow TV contest star James Arthur, rapper Post Malone and hip-hop duo Rae Sremmurd.

Women have frequently been Artist of the Year, with Taylor Swift winning three times and Ariana Grande taking the prize last year.

The American Music Awards also has separate female and male categories, with Lady Gaga, Rihanna and Alessia Cara in the running for favourite pop/rock female artist.

The nominations come amid growing attention to gender inequality in the United States — conspicuously so in the entertainment industry — and amid mounting allegations that Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein preyed for years on young women.

AFP

Beyonce Wins Big At BET Awards 2017

Beyonce, the new mother of twins, won big on Sunday at the BET Awards 2017, which held at the Microsoft Theater in Los Angeles, U.S.

The pop singer, won four of the five categories she was nominated in, but was however not present to receive them.

When it was announced that she won the viewer’s choice award, Chloe x Halle – the young duo signed to Beyonce – recited a speech given to them from the pop star.

Other winners for the night included Bruno Mars who won two awards, Chance The Rapper who was named best new artiste and Nigeria’s Wizkid, who bagged the Best International Act (Africa) award.

See full list of winners at the event.

BEST FEMALE R&B/POP ARTIST
Beyonce
Kehlani
Mary J. Blige
Rihanna
Solange

BEST MALE R&B/POP ARTIST
Bruno Mars
Chris Brown
The Weeknd
Trey Songz
Usher

VIEWERS’ CHOICE AWARD
Migos featuring Lil Uzi Vert, “Bad and Boujee”
Bruno Mars, “24K Magic”
Beyonce, “Sorry”
The Weeknd featuring Daft Punk, “Starboy”
Drake, “Fake Love”
Rae Sremmurd featuring Gucci Mane, “Black Beatles”

BEST GROUP
2 Chainz and Lil Wayne
A Tribe Called Quest
Fat Joe and Remy Ma
Migos
Rae Sremmurd

BEST COLLABORATION
Beyonce featuring Kendrick Lamar, “Freedom”
Chance the Raper featuring 2 Chainz, “No Problem”
Chris Brown featuring Gucci Mane and Usher, “Party”
DJ Khaled featuring Beyonce and JAY-Z, “Shining”
Migos featuring Lil Uzi Vert, “Bad and Boujee”
Rae Sremmurd featuring Gucci Mane, “Black Beatles”

BEST MALE HIP HOP ARTIST
Big Sean
Chance the Rapper
Drake
Future
J. Cole
Kendrick Lamar

BEST FEMALE HIP HOP ARTIST
Cardi B
Missy Elliott
Nicki Minaj
Remy Ma
Young M.A

VIDEO OF THE YEAR
Beyonce, “Sorry”
Big Sean, “Bounce Back”
Bruno Mars, “24K Magic”
Migos featuring Lil Uzi Vert, “Bad and Boujee”
Solange, “Cranes in the Sky”

VIDEO DIRECTOR OF THE YEAR
Benny Boom – Kehlani, “Crazy”
Bruno Mars and Jonathan Lia – Bruno Mars, “That’s What I Like”
Director X – Zayn Malik, “Like I Would”
Hype Williams – Tyga featuring Desiigner, “Gucci Snakes”
Kahlil Joseph and Beyonce Knowles-Carter – Beyonce, “Sorry”

BEST NEW ARTIST
21 Savage
Cardi B
Chance the Rapper
Khalid
Young M.A

BEST ACTRESS
Gabrielle Union
Issa Rae
Janelle Monae
Taraji P. Henson
Viola Davis

BEST ACTOR
Bryshere Y. Gray
Denzel Washington
Donald Glover
Mahershala Ali
Omari Hardwick

DR. BOBBY JONES BEST GOSPEL/INSPIRATIONAL AWARD
CeCe Winans, “Never Have to Be Alone”
Fantasia featuring Tye Tribbett, “I Made It”
Kirk Franklin featuring Sarah Reeves, Tasha Cobbs and Tamela Mann, “My World Needs You”
Lecrae, “Can’t Stop Me Now (Destination)”
Tamela Mann, “God Provides”

YOUNGSTARS AWARD
Ace Hunter
Caleb McLaughlin
Jaden Smith
Marsai Martin
Yara Shahidi

BEST MOVIE
“Get Out”
“Moonlight”
“Hidden Figures”
“Fences”
“The Birth of a Nation”

SPORTSWOMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD
Gabby Douglas
Serena Williams
Simone Biles
Skylar Diggins
Venus Williams

SPORTSMAN OF THE YEAR AWARD
LeBron James
Cam Netwon
Odell Beckam Jr.
Russell Westbrook
Stephen Curry

CENTRIC AWARD
Fantasia, “Sleeping with the One I Love”
Kehlani, “Distraction”
Mary J. Blige, “Thick of It”
Solange, “Cranes In the Sky”
SYD, “All About Me”
Yuna featuring Usher, “Crush”

ALBUM OF THE YEAR
Bruno Mars, “24K Magic”
J. Cole, “4 Your Eyez Only”
Solange, “A Seat at the Table”
Chance the Rapper, “Coloring Book”
Beyonce, “Lemonade”

BEST INTERNATIONAL ACT: EUROPE
Stormzy
Skepta
Giggs
Craig David
Wiley
Emeli Sande
MHD
Booba

BEST INTERNATIONAL ACT: AFRICA
Wizkid
Tekno
Mr. Eazi
Davido
Stonebwoy
AKA
Nasty C

Tailor Swift Wins Big At MTV VMAs

VMA AwardsSeveral moments made highlights of the 32 annual MTV Video Music Awards (VMAs) including Nicki Minaj challenging Miley Cyrus, Cyrus announcing a surprise album, Kanye West’s poignant Video Vanguard Award speech and  Justin Bieber dominating the 2015 VMAs.

 

 

 

Check Out The Full List Of Winners.

Video of the Year
Taylor Swift ft Kendrick Lamar – “Bad Blood”
Beyoncé – “7/11”
Ed Sheeran – “Thinking Out Loud”
Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars – “Uptown Funk”
Kendrick Lamar – “Alright”

Best Female Video
Taylor Swift – “Blank Space”
Beyoncé – “7/11”
Nicki Minaj – “Anaconda”
Sia – “Elastic Heart”
Ellie Goulding – “Love Me Like You Do”

Best Male Video
Mark Ronson ft Bruno Mars – “Uptown Funk”
Ed Sheeran – “Thinking Out Loud”
Kendrick Lamar – “Alright”
The Weeknd – “Earned It”
Nick Jonas – “Chains”

Best Hip-Hop Video
Nicki Minaj – “Anaconda”
Fetty Wap – “Trap Queen”
Kendrick Lamar – “Alright”
Wiz Khalifa ft Charlie Puth – “See You Again”
Big Sean ft E-40 – “IDFWU”

Best Pop Video
Taylor Swift – “Blank Space”
Beyoncé – “7/11″
Ed Sheeran – “Thinking Out Loud”
Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars – “Uptown Funk”
Maroon 5 – “Sugar”

Best Rock Video
Fall Out Boy – “Uma Thurman”
Hozier – “Take Me to Church”
Florence + the Machine – “Ship to Wreck”
Walk the Moon – “Shut Up and Dance”
Arctic Monkeys – “Why’d You Only Call Me When You’re High?”

Artist to Watch
Fetty Wap – “Trap Queen”
Vance Joy – “Riptide”
George Ezra – “Budapest”
James Bay – “Hold Back The River”
FKA Twigs – “Pendulum”

Video With a Social Message
Big Sean ft Kanye West and John Legend – “One Man Can Change the World”
Jennifer Hudson – “I Still Love You”
Colbie Caillat – “Try”
Rihanna – “American Oxygen”
Wale – “The White Shoes”

Best Collaboration
Taylor Swift ft Kendrick Lamar – “Bad Blood”
Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars – “Uptown Funk”
Wiz Khalifa ft. Charlie Puth – “See You Again”
Ariana Grande & The Weeknd – “Love Me Harder”
Jessie J, Ariana Grande, Nicki Minaj – “Bang Bang”

Best Art Direction
Snoop Dogg – “So Many Pros” (François Rousselet, Jason Fijal)
Taylor Swift ft. Kendrick Lamar – “Bad Blood” (Charles Infante)
Jack White – “Would You Fight For My Love” (Jack White, Jeff Peterson)
The Chemical Brothers – “Go” (Michel Gondry)
Skrillex & Diplo – “Where Are U Now” with Justin Bieber (Brewer)

Best Choreography
OK Go – “I Won’t Let You Down” (OK Go, air:man and Mori Harano)
Beyoncé – “7/11” (Beyoncé, Chris Grant, Additional choreography: Gabriel Valenciano)
Chet Faker – “Gold” (Ryan Heffington)
Ed Sheeran – “Don’t” (Nappy Tabs)
Flying Lotus ft. Kendrick Lamar – “Never Catch Me” (Keone and Mari Madrid)

Best Cinematography
Flying Lotus ft Kendrick Lamar – “Never Catch Me” (Larkin Sieple)
Ed Sheeran – “Thinking Out Loud” (Daniel Pearl)
Taylor Swift ft. Kendrick Lamar – “Bad Blood” (Christopher Probst)
FKA Twigs – “Two Weeks” (Justin Brown)
Alt-J – “Left Hand Free” (Mike Simpson)

Best Direction
Kendrick Lamar – “Alright” (Colin Tilley & The Little Homies)Taylor Swift ft Kendrick Lamar – “Bad Blood” (Joseph Kahn)
Mark Ronson ft. Bruno Mars – “Uptown Funk” (Bruno Mars & Cameron Duddy)
Hozier – “Take Me to Church” (Brendan Canty and Conal Thomson of Feel Good Lost)
Childish Gambino – “Sober” (Hiro Murai)

Best Editing
Beyoncé – “7/11” (Beyoncé, Ed Burke, Jonathan Wing)
Ed Sheeran – “Don’t” (Jacquelyn London)
Taylor Swift ft. Kendrick Lamar – “Bad Blood” (Chancler Haynes at Cosmo Street)
A$AP Rocky – “L$D” (Dexter Navy)
Skrillex & Diplo – “Where Are U Now” with Justin Bieber (Brewer)

Best Visual Effects
Skrillex & Diplo – “Where Are U Now” with Justin Bieber (Brewer)
Taylor Swift ft Kendrick Lamar – “Bad Blood” (Ingenuity Studios)
FKA Twigs – “Two Weeks” (Gloria FX, Tomash Kuzmytskyi, and Max Chyzhevskyy)
Childish Gambino – “Telegraph Ave.” (Gloria FX)
Tyler, the Creator – “F****** Young/Death Camp” (Gloria FX)

Judge to Quash Cocaine Charge against Bruno Mars

The cocaine charge brought against Grenade hitmaker Bruno Mars will be dismissed today as he completes his court-ordered community service.

Bruno Mars

Bruno Mars was arrested at a hotel in Las Vegas in 2010 after a suspicious behaviour was observed by a bathroom attendant and was quickly reported, the singer pleaded guilty to drugs charge afterwards.

His conviction was deffered and the court mandated that Bruno Mars serve 200-hours of community service and also attend a course for drug education.

It was reported that so far Bruno Mars has logged more than 230 hours of community service in several charities and also his drug education classes completed.

Bruno Mars will be in court today to have the Judge dismiss the charge against him.

Peter Gene Hernandez an American singer-songwriter and record producer, better known by his stage name Bruno Mars was born October 8, 1985,

Raised in Honolulu, Hawaii by a family of musicians, Mars began making music at a young age.

Performing in various musical venues in his hometown throughout his childhood and decided to pursue a musical career and moved to Los Angeles after graduating from high school.