Lawyer Lauds CJN For Stopping Appeal Court’s Conflicting Verdict

Robert Clarke-courtA Senior Advocate of Nigeria, Robert Clarke, has expressed delight in the call by the Chief Justice of Nigeria (CJN) to stop the Court of Appeal from giving conflicting judgements on cases.

Speaking on Sunrise Daily, Mr Clarke said that the CJN’s statement would enable lawyers, who have inhibitions about the system of judgement, to express their views.

He explained that the hierarchy of courts in Nigeria was part of the bedrock of the judicial system, saying “when the Supreme Court declares a position of law on a given issue, that position is sacrosanct”.

The Senior Advocate also criticised the decision of the Appellate Court on political cases, stating that most of the judgements were settled in other areas of law such as the criminal justices, maritime cases among others.

Mr Clarke believed that 80 per cent of top legal practitioners in Nigeria were aware of the challenges facing the judiciary but would not want to say anything about it.

“I can assure you that 80 per cent of top lawyers know that the judiciary today is not what we met and if nothing is done to it, it will collapse on our head,” he said.

The Senior Advocate also criticised the way judges were being appointed, saying they were appointed by politicians on recommendation.

He also pointed out that the calibre of judges appointed were part of the causes of the problems of the judicial system in Nigeria.

“I am very sorry to say, except for one, two or three in the Supreme Court today, there is no judgement you can now take and feel.. oh, this is a fantastic judgement,” he said.

Quadri Ready For ITTF World Tour In Poland

ITTF-quadriAfter a disappointing start in the French League, Nigeria’s Aruna Quadri will this week return to the International Table Tennis Federation (ITTF) World Tour in Warsaw, Poland.

Last week, Quadri could not save his French team, Morez from losing 4-zero to Chartres A.S in the elite league of the French Table Tennis League.

Quadri is seeded number 25 and he will start his campaign from the main draw of the men’s singles of the five-day tournament.

In the men’s doubles, the Nigerian will partner his continental arch-rival and friend, Egypt’s Omar Assar.

23 Vehicles Burnt As Fire Guts Mechanic Village In Agidingbi

fireThe spate of fire outbreaks in Lagos has just got another incident added to its list, as an inferno overnight gutted a mechanic village in the Agidingbi axis of the state.

A total of 23 vehicles, generators, computers and gas cylinders were torched, raising eyebrows over the issue of safety in areas with high concentration of combustible items.

The General Manager of the Lagos State Emergency Management Agency (LASEMA), in reaction to the incident, said sensitization on safety measures is on the rise, to curb fire outbreaks in the state.

Recently, a fire incident that occurred around Lawanson area in the state claimed at least five lives.

 

Jidenna Apologises To Nigerians For ‘Kidnap’ Comments

jidennaNigerian-American sensational singer, Jidenna has penned an open letter to Nigerians after coming under fire for kidnap comments he made in a recent interview.

The ‘classic man’ crooner through his official website calls Nigerians his brothers and sisters and says he will always be proud of his Nigerian heritage.

Read the full letter below:

To all my Nigerian brothers and sisters…

I am, always have been, and always will be proud of my Nigerian heritage. I understand the pain and anger caused by some of the comments I made in a recent interview, and I wanted to address you directly. Contrary to popular belief, this interview was not the first in which I mentioned Nigeria. In fact, I’m frequently bragging about how Nigerians attend the world’s most prestigious institutions, and how we are known to produce world class doctors, entrepreneurs, innovators, lawyers, engineers, professors, athletes and artists. Unfortunately, people tend to leave these moments out, and, in this case, highlight stereotypes. I would never do or say anything to intentionally disgrace the legacy of my father nor my fatherland. But to not relay my own story, both the good times and the bad, would be a disservice.

My name is Jidenna, which means “to hold or embrace the father” in Igbo. It was my father who gave me this name and who taught me countless parables, proverbs, and principles that made me the man I am today. These same principles helped me to write the record “Classic Man.” When I brought home a 98 percent on a test, my father would say, “ah ah, where are the other two points? Go and get them, then bring them back.” My father and Nigerian culture has always stood for excellence. While the majority of my childhood memories are beautiful, I also have experienced the challenges that Nigeria has faced since Independence.

When I was 5 years old, my family was robbed at gunpoint, my mother was beaten, family members were kidnapped, and I was shot in my foot. As is the case with all kidnapping, targeting those who are perceived to be wealthy is the objective. In this instance, my father was the target because of his prominence in the community. This was a traumatic experience for my family that would shape our entire lives and our experiences in both Nigeria and America. As a little boy, I swore that I would never let that happen to my family again. As my father often said, “Once you’re bitten by a snake, you‘ll be ready to shoot a lizard!” At the time of my father’s burial 5 years ago, my family in the village was concerned about increased targeting for kidnapping since the rate of abductions had increased dramatically in the area we are from. We were traveling from America, which along with our biracial appearance, had the potential to attract attention and pose a threat to our security. In light of what happened in the past and the tense climate at the time, my family took precautions to ensure our safety. This was not an uncommon protocol at the time. I recognize incidents such as these are not unique to Nigeria or the African continent, and there have been significant improvements in the region since this period.

In the recent interview to which I’ve been referring, I shared my family’s experience traveling from the States back home for the burial. In this interview, I used the term “light-skinned.” When using this term, I was actually referring to my immediate family’s mixed or biracial appearance. See, no matter what language I use to describe my heritage, I’m certain that someone will feel some kind of way. This is a larger discussion not meant for this statement, but certainly derives from our colonial past and postcolonial present, and in the States, from the days of slavery to the present times. My comments about skin tone were related to the notion of perceived wealth and value, not my personal beliefs. My point was never to imply that biracial or “light-skinned” people are the only ones or the most targeted group of people kidnapped, or that I myself was wealthy at the time. Rather than focus on my perceived value, let us continue to focus on the value of Nigeria.

There is no question that Africa is playing a pivotal role in the future of our planet and that Nigeria, with it’s booming economy and burgeoning middle class, is a driving force. I will continue to play my role in the Renaissance taking place in Nigeria and Africa at large. We may not agree on everything, but know my heart is your heart, and my experience is part of our collective experience.