UN Warns Of More Extreme Weather Ahead After Hottest Decade On Record

 

The past decade has been the hottest on record, the UN said Wednesday, warning that the higher temperatures were expected to fuel numerous extreme weather events in 2020 and beyond.

The World Meteorological Organization, which based its findings on an analysis of leading international datasets, said increases in global temperatures had already had dire consequences, pointing to “retreating ice, record sea levels, increasing ocean heat and acidification, and extreme weather”.

WMO said its research also confirmed data released by the European Union’s climate monitor last week showing that 2019 was the second hottest year on record, after 2016.

“The year 2020 has started out where 2019 left off — with high-impact weather and climate-related events,” WMO chief Petteri Taalas said in a statement, pointing in particular to the devastating bushfires that have been raging in Australia for months.

The bushfires, unprecedented in their duration and intensity, have claimed 28 lives and highlighted the type of disasters that scientists say the world will increasingly face due to global warming.

The fires have already destroyed more than 2,000 homes and burnt 10 million hectares (100,000 square kilometres) of land — an area larger than South Korea or Portugal.

“Unfortunately, we expect to see much extreme weather throughout 2020 and the coming decades, fuelled by record levels of heat-trapping greenhouse gases in the atmosphere,” Taalas said.

The UN agency said that average global temperatures during both the past five-year (2015-2019) and 10-year (2010-2019) periods were the highest ever recorded.

“Since the 1980s each decade has been warmer than the previous one,” the UN agency said in a statement, warning that “this trend is expected to continue”.

The United Nations said last year that man-made greenhouse gas emissions needed to tumble 7.6 percent each year to 2030 in order to limit temperature rises to 1.5 Celsius — the more ambitious cap nations signed up to in the landmark Paris climate deal.

Current pledges to cut emissions put Earth on a path of several degrees warming by the end of the century.

‘Not a Fluke’

Taalas said that since modern records began in 1850, the average global temperature had risen by around 1.1 degrees Celsius, and warned of significant warming in the future.

“On the current path of carbon dioxide emissions, we are heading towards a temperature increase of three to five degrees Celsius by the end of the century,” he warned.

Gavin Schmidt, director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies which provided one of the datasets, added that the trend line was unmistakable and could not be attributed to normal climate variability — a position taken by US President Donald Trump.

“What’s happening is persistent, not a fluke due to some weather phenomenon: we know that the long-term trends are being driven by the increasing levels of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere,” he said.

Data from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration meanwhile revealed that polar sea ice coverage continued its downward trend in 2019.

Both the Arctic and Antarctic oceans recorded their second-smallest average annual sea-ice coverage during the 1979–2019 period of record, the agency said.

‘Broken Record’

WMO also highlighted a new study published this week in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences with data showing that ocean heat content was at a record high in 2019.

The past five years, and past decade, were also the warmest on record in terms of ocean heat content, that study showed.

Since more than 90 percent of excess heat is stored in the world’s oceans, their heat content is a good way to quantify the rate of global warming, WMO said.

Conservationists said the UN agency’s findings were to be expected.

“It is no surprise that 2019 was the second hottest year on record — nature has been persistently reminding us that we have to pick up the pace,” said Manuel Pulgar-Vidal, leader of WWF’s global climate and energy practice, calling for dramatic measures to halt the warming trend.

“This is not so much a record as a broken record,” added Chris Rapley, a professor of climate science at University College London.

“The message repeats with grim regularity. Yet the pace and scale of action to address climate change remains muted and far from the need.”

‘Nobody Knows The Causes Of Climate Change’ – Putin

Putin 'Ultimately' Responsible For Spy Poisoning, UK Claims
In this file photo, Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a joint press conference with his French counterpart following their talks at the Konstantin Palace in Strelna, outside Saint Petersburg, on May 24, 2018. Ludovic MARIN / AFP

 

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday said “nobody knows” what causes climate change, appearing to cast doubt over whether global warming was of man-made origin and stating it may be due to cosmological processes.

“Nobody knows the origins of global climate change,” Putin told reporters at the start of his marathon end-of-year news conference. “We know that in the history of our Earth there have been periods of warming and cooling and it could depend on processes in the universe,” he added.

 

AFP

Technological Innovation, Energy Efficiency Key To Reducing Impacts Of Climate Change – Barkindo

Photo Credit: Official OPEC Twitter account

 

Innovations in technology, improved energy efficiency have been identified as part of the solutions to mitigate the impact of climate change globally.

This is according to the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) Secretary General, Mohammad Barkindo, during the UN Climate Change Conference in Spain.

Mr Barkindo said that OPEC recognizes the complexity of climate change and there is no solution for global warming, while adding that all viable mitigation measures are necessary.

He stressed the support given to the Paris Agreement and urged that nobody should be left behind by the energy transition.

“At OPEC, we listen extensively to the scientists. We wholeheartedly support the Paris Agreement and the ethos of multilateralism that underpins it. The core elements of the Convention, particularly historical responsibility and national circumstances must be adhered to.

“We recognize the complexity and magnitude of climate change we are living in our countries. There is no panacea for global warming. All viable mitigation and adaptation measures are necessary.

“Technological innovation, including CCUS, enhanced investment for energy access, and improved energy efficiency must be part of the solution. The oil industry is committed to all of these,” he added.

READ ALSO: Senate To Investigate Actions Of NNPC Regarding Freight Of Petroleum Products

The OPEC Secretary General restated the role of oil companies in offering solutions, stating that the transition must be holistic.

“Nobody should be left behind by the energy transition. We reject an energy transition from one source to another.

“The oil industry must be part of the solution to the impacts of climate change.

“The energy transition must be holistic, inclusive, fair and equitable in accordance with the core UNFCCC principle of common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities.”

Mr Barkindo, while making reference to his early days in Yola, Adamawa State, stated the challenges faced in accessing energy, particularly fuel.

He said that the experience is what replicates globally, stating that almost one billion people worldwide lack access to electricity.

“I grew up in Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria. There, even today, keeping the lights on in our houses, insulating our homes or accessing clean water  ̶  amenities taken for granted by many countries  ̶  are beyond the reach of the most vulnerable in our communities.

“Sadly, this is a situation experienced in many developing countries.

“The almost one billion people worldwide who currently lack access to electricity and the three billion without modern fuels for cooking are not just statistics on a page. They are real people. Each one is an individual.”

He stated that: “Fuel poverty is not an abstract concept; rather it is a profound challenge for sustainable development. It is an all-too brutal reality for hungry families living in the cold or dark, for the millions of children currently attending schools without power, and for many hospitals without reliable energy.”

Natural Gas Spikes CO2 Emissions In 2019, As Coal Consumption Declines

A picture taken on November 30, 2019 shows smoke and vapor rising from the cooling towers and chimneys of the lignite-fired Jaenschwalde power plant in eastern Germany. Christophe Gateau / dpa / AFP
A picture taken on November 30, 2019 shows smoke and vapor rising from the cooling towers and chimneys of the lignite-fired Jaenschwalde power plant in eastern Germany. Christophe Gateau / dpa / AFP

 

Global carbon emissions boosted by soaring natural gas use are set to hit record levels in 2019 despite a decline in coal consumption and a string of countries declaring a climate emergency, researchers said Wednesday.

In its annual analysis of fossil fuel trends, the Global Carbon Project said CO2 emissions were on course to rise 0.6 percent this year — slower than previous years but still a world away from what is needed to keep global warming in check.

In three peer-reviewed studies, authors attributed the rise to “robust growth” in natural gas and oil, which offset significant falls in coal use in the United States and Europe.

“We see clearly that global changes come from fluctuations in coal use,” said Corrine Le Quere, from the University of East Anglia, an author on the Carbon Budget report.

“In contrast the use of oil and particularly natural gas is going up unabated. Natural gas is now the biggest contributor to the growth in emissions.”

Atmospheric CO2 levels, which have been climbing exponentially in recent decades, are expected to hit an average of 410 parts per million this year, Le Quere said.

That’s the highest level in at least 800,000 years.

The report will make for further uncomfortable reading for delegates gathered at UN climate talks in Madrid, with the warnings from the world’s top climate scientists still ringing in their ears.

Last week the UN said global emissions needed to fall 7.6 percent each year, every year, to 2030 to stand any chance of limiting temperature rises to 1.5C (2.6 Farenheit).

With just 1C of warming since the industrial era so far, 2019 saw a string of deadly superstorms, drought, wildfires and flooding, made more intense by climate change.

The UN said Wednesday that the 2010s was almost certain to be the hottest decade on record and as many as 22 million people could be displaced by extreme weather this year.

‘Urgency not sunk in’

The authors pointed out 2019’s rise in emissions was slower than each of the two previous years.

Yet with energy demand showing no sign of peaking even with the rapid growth of low carbon technology such as wind and solar power, emissions in 2019 are still set to be four percent higher than in 2015, the year nations agreed to limit temperature rises in the Paris climate accord.

While emissions levels can vary annually depending on economic growth and even weather trends, the Carbon Budget report shows how far nations still need to travel to drag down carbon pollution.

“Current policies are clearly not enough to reverse trends in global emissions. The urgency of action has not sunk in yet,” said Le Quere.

She highlighted anticipated emissions falls of 1.7 percent in the US and Europe as the power sector continues its switch away from coal.

The most polluting fossil fuel saw its usage drop by as much as 10 percent in the two regions this year, the report said.

But such savings were offset globally by the likes of India and China, the biggest overall emitter, and specifically by an increase in energy from natural gas.

“Compared to coal, natural gas is a cleaner fossil fuel, but unabated natural gas use merely cooks the planet more slowly than coal,” said Glen Peters, research director at the CICERO Center for International Climate Research.

For Joeri Rogelj, lecturer in Climate Change at the Grantham Institute, Imperial College London, the small slowdown in emissions growth this year “is really nothing to be overly enthusiastic about”.

Without drastic and sustained reductions, he said, “it is clear that we are not only continuing to make climate change worse, we’re doing it at a pace faster than ever before.”

 

AFP

‘We Must Stop Our War Against Nature,’ Says UN Chief On Climate

“We must stop our war against nature,” UN chief Antonio Guterres said Sunday in Madrid ahead of a key climate conference, warning against the devastating impacts of global warming.

“For many decades the human species has been at war with the planet, and now the planet is fighting back,” he said, decrying the “utterly inadequate” efforts of the world’s major economies to curb carbon pollution.

“We must stop our war against nature, and science tells us we can do it.”

Climate Change: Nigerian Govt To Plant 25 Million Trees

A file photo of Minister of Environment, Mohammad Abubakar. Photo: [email protected]

 

 

The Federal Government will soon commence the planting of 25 million trees, as part of efforts to check the menace of afforestation, desert encroachment, and erosion in the country.

The Minister of Environment, Muhammad Abubakar, announced this on Saturday called for actions to address the issue of climate change in the development of states across the nation.

He made the announcement at the 13th session of the National Council on Environment Kaduna State, attended by experts and various stakeholders in the sector.

READ ALSO: US Govt Charges Air Peace CEO With Bank Fraud, Money Laundering

On his part, the Senate Committee Deputy Chairman on Environment, Hassan Hadeja, called on the states and Federal Government to make more investment in solar energy.

The lawmaker believes this will go a long way in reducing pollution of the environment.

Over the years, climate change has become a threat to global security going by the effects of flooding, earthquake, and fire outbreaks among others.

As part of this trend, the alarming rate of desertification in In Nigeria’s northern region has forced thousands of herders to move to the middle-belt and South, leading to incessant clashes with farmers in the regions.

The Guinea Savannah region is not spared either as logging and over-dependence on firewood for cooking have stripped a greater part of the area of its vegetation cover.

The situation is not different in the south-south region where the forest has reduced to grassland while erosion has continued to devastate many communities in Nigeria’s south-east zone.

The National Council on Environment is Nigeria’s highest policy-making body in the environment sector.

It facilitates inter-governmental deliberations and guides consultation on environment issues at all levels of the government.

Saturday’s event focused on safeguarding the environment through advocacy as experts and policymakers brainstormed and made suggestions on how to checkmate the challenges of climate change.

The meeting has the theme ‘Promoting Environmental Advocacy, A Panacea for Achieving the Next Level Agenda.”

According to stakeholders present, including the Deputy Governor of Kaduna State, Hadiza Balarabe, and the Guest Speaker, Professor Mohammed Ibrahim, positive engagements among critical stakeholders will ensure effective implementation of policies and laws that will help in tackling environmental challenges in the country.

Senate To Investigate NEMA Over ‘Selective’ Disaster Response

 

The Senate has directed its Committees on Special Duties, Ecology and Climate Change and Environment to investigate the effectiveness of the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) over disaster response in 2019.

According to the Special Assistant (Press) to the President of the Senate, Ezrel Tabiowo, the Red Chamber also directed NEMA to immediately implement a response programme for the flood disaster that affected various communities in Demsa, Numa, Guyuk and Lamurde Local Governments of Adamawa State.

These were some of the resolutions reached at plenary on Tuesday sequel to the consideration of a motion sponsored by Senator Binos Yaroe (APC, Adamawa South).

According to Yaroe, NEMA was established by Act 50 of the 1999 Constitution as amended for the purpose of managing disasters in Nigeria.

The lawmaker who lamented a major flooding which occurred in October 2019 as a result of the release of excess water by the authorities of Lagbo dam in Cameroon, accused NEMA of being selective in its disaster response interventions.

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“NEMA performed a disaster response action by distributing relief materials to communities in Furore, Yola South, Yola North and Girei Local Governments of Adamawa State affected by the floods.

“This intervention by NEMA was not extended to other local governments in Adamawa State along the River Benue valley equally affected by the flood disaster.

“Although the attention of the Director-General of NEMA was drawn to the need to provide relief materials to communities of the four local governments in Adamawa State severely affected by the October floods, nothing has been done; and NEMA would appear to be selective in its disaster response interventions,” Yaroe said.

Meanwhile, the Senate also considered a Bill for an Act to amend the National Council on Public Procurement and Bureau of Public Procurement Act No. 14 of 2007.

The bill which was sponsored by Senator Abdullahi Sankara is among the three bills up for amendment of the Public Procurement Act by the National Assembly.

According to the Senate President, Ahmad Lawan, an amendment to the Public Procurement Act would ensure a successful implementation of the 2020 budget when passed into law by the National Assembly.

The Public Procurement Bill sponsored by Senator Sankara was referred to the Senate Committee on Public Procurement for further legislative work.

Italy’s Venice Braces For More Flooding

People walk in the flooded street near Rialto bridge, on November 15, 2019 in Venice, two days after the city suffered its highest tide in 50 years. Filippo MONTEFORTE / AFP
People walk in the flooded street near Rialto bridge, on November 15, 2019 in Venice, two days after the city suffered its highest tide in 50 years. Filippo MONTEFORTE / AFP

 

Venice was on red alert for more floods and fierce winds on Saturday after an exceptionally high tide swamped the city of canals, where authorities have declared a state of emergency.

Mayor Luigi Brugnaro ordered the iconic St Mark’s Square closed on Friday as the latest sea surge struck with strong storms and winds battering the region.

It reached a high of 1.54 metres (five feet) just before midday — lower than Tuesday’s peak but still dangerous.

“I’m forced to close the square to avoid health risks for citizens… a disaster,” Brugnaro said.

In the afternoon the square reopened as water levels receded.

But civil protection authorities issued a weather “red alert” for the Venice region on Saturday, warning of violent winds.

Churches, shops and homes in the UNESCO city have been inundated by unusually intense “acqua alta”, or high water, which on Tuesday hit their highest level in half a century.

“We’ve destroyed Venice, we’re talking about one billion (euros) in damage and that’s just from the other day, not today,” Brugnaro said.

The crisis has prompted the government to release 20 million euros ($22 million) in funds to tackle the devastation.

“It’s shocking to see this, having water up to your knees,” Mexican tourist Oscar Calzada, 19, told AFP Friday.

Surveying the damage, Culture Minister Dario Franceschini warned the task of repairing the city would be huge. More than 50 churches had suffered damage, he said.

“Seeing these places first-hand gives the sense of a much greater disaster than TV images show,” Franceschini said.

Hotel reservations cancelled

Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte declared a state of emergency for the city on Thursday.

Residents whose houses have been hit are eligible for up to 5,000 euros in immediate government aid, while restaurant and shop owners can receive up to 20,000 euros and apply for more later.

Mayor Brugnaro on Friday also announced the opening of a fund where people in Italy and around the world could contribute to the historic city’s repair.

One tourist, Italian Nicole Righetti, said she would be willing to pitch in.

“It would be a shame to no longer be able to see these places, and I think everyone should give,” Righettii said.

Some Venetians, used to the inconvenience of their city’s rising waters, nevertheless expressed frustration.

“All the stock in the basement is lost,” lamented Luciano, a worker at a shop along St. Mark’s Square.

He said he remembered well the infamous “acqua alta” of 1966, when the water rose to a level of 1.94 metres, the highest-ever since records began in 1923.

“These so frequent high waters have never happened before… this time there’s so much more damage than in the past,” he said.

Hotels reported cancelled reservations, some as far ahead as December, following the widespread diffusion of images of Venice underwater.

Climate change warning

Tuesday’s high waters submerged around 80 percent of the city, officials said.

Many, including Venice’s mayor, have blamed the disaster on global warming and warned that the country prone to natural disasters must wake up to the risks posed by ever more volatile seasons.

The Serenissima, as the floating city is called, is home to 50,000 residents but receives 36 million global visitors each year.

A massive infrastructure project called MOSE has been under way since 2003 to protect the city, but it has been plagued by cost overruns, corruption scandals and delays.

 

AFP

Climate Change, Corruption Blamed For Venice Flood Devastation

A tourist takes a photo from the flooded embankment by the Rialto bridge, after an exceptional overnight “Alta Acqua” high tide water level, on November 13, 2019 in Venice. Venice was hit by the highest tide in more than 50 years late November 12, with tourists wading through flooded streets to seek shelter as a fierce wind whipped up waves in St. Mark’s Square. PHOTO: MARCO BERTORELLO / AFP

 

Much of Venice was left under water after the highest tide in 50 years ripped through the historic Italian city, beaching gondolas, trashing hotels and sending tourists fleeing through rapidly rising waters.

The government in Rome was expected to declare a state of emergency at a cabinet meeting on Thursday after Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte described the flooding as “a blow to the heart of our country”.

Officials blamed climate change while shopkeepers on the Grand Canal raged against those who have failed to protect the UNESCO city from the high tide.

They said corruption had repeatedly delayed a barrier protection system that could have prevented the disaster.

“The city is on its knees,” Venice mayor Luigi Brugnaro said in an interview with national broadcaster RAI.

“There’s widespread devastation,” he said in the famed St Mark’s Square, which bore the brunt of the flooding. “In all likelihood the damage from last night runs into hundreds of millions of euros.”

The state of emergency for a natural disaster will allow the government to use “exceptional powers and means” to intervene more quickly, and Conte said his government was ready to allocate funds.

“The disaster that has struck Venice is a blow to the heart of our country,” Conte said at the scene. “It hurts to see the city so damaged, its artistic heritage threatened.”

St Mark’s Square was calm on Wednesday evening, with just a smattering of tourists walking through the relatively dry square marked with occasional puddles.

Four Venetian friends who had gathered in the square, all wearing boots, said the relative quiet and lack of tourists was upside of an otherwise harrowing few days.

“We’ve never seen anything like it,” said Alvise, 19.

Earlier, tourists lugging heavy suitcases waded in thigh-high boots or barefoot through the submerged alleys, as gondola and water taxi drivers baled sewage-tainted water out of their trashed vessels.

Schools would stay closed on Thursday, authorities said.

‘We can’t live like this’

Dirty water was swirling around the marble tombs inside the 12th-century crypt of St Mark’s Basilica, which suffered untold damage when an unprecedented high tide swept through the city.

It was closed to tourists as were many other Venice highlights including the Fenice Theatre and the Ducal Palace.

“We said last year that the basilica had aged 20 years in a high tide. It risks having aged much more than that in this one,” said the building’s procurator Carlo Alberto Tesserin.

A 78-year old was killed by an electric shock as the waters poured into his home.

“We ask the government to help us, the costs will be high,” mayor Brugnaro tweeted. “These are the effects of climate change.”

“The future of Venice is at stake,” he warned. “We cannot live like this anymore.”

Environment Minister Sergio Costa blamed climate change and the “tropicalisation” of violent rainfall and strong winds.

“This is what is happening more and more often in the Mediterranean,” Costa said on Facebook.

“Global warming will destroy our planet if we do not immediately reverse the direction.”

 ‘Acqua alta’

The exceptionally intense “acqua alta,” or high waters, peaked at 1.87 metres (six feet). Only once since records began in 1923 has the water crept even higher, reaching 1.94 metres in 1966.

“It was unbelievable. The water rose so quickly,” said resident Tiziano Collarin, 59, as he surveyed the damage.

“Windows were blown out, there are those who have lost everything,” he said as the flood alarm rang out to warn those in the canal city that the tide, which had receded somewhat overnight, was rising once again.

The fire brigade said it had carried out over 400 operations as well as laying on extra boats as water ambulances.

Around 160 firefighters were deployed to rescue people stranded on jetties and to recover boats broken free from their moorings.

President of the Veneto region Luca Zaia said 80 percent of the city had been submerged, causing “unimaginable damage” to the city, which has 50,000 residents but receives 36 million visitors each year.

A massive infrastructure project called MOSE has been under way since 2003 to protect the city, but it has been plagued by cost overruns, corruption scandals and delays.

The plan involves 78 gates that can be raised to protect Venice’s lagoon during high tides — but a recent attempt to test part of the barrier caused worrying vibrations and engineers discovered parts had rusted.

Outside historic Venice, the Lido and Pellestrina islands were also hard hit by flooding.

AFP

Climate Change Amplifies Conflicts, Hinders Peacebuilding In Somalia – Report

AFP photo

 

 

Climate change poses serious challenges to current and future peacebuilding efforts and can amplify conflicts, according to a report on years of devastating violence and drought in Somalia released Wednesday.

Researchers at the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI) looked at how conflicts and the peacebuilding efforts of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) have been affected by climate change, and found that it “amplifies existing challenges and strengthens radical groups”.

“What it shows is that the security landscape is changing with climate change,” Florian Krampe, senior researcher at SIPRI’s climate change programme, told AFP, adding that many of the findings are applicable to other conflicts.

READ ALSO: Police Recover 39 Bodies In Container Near London

According to the report, decades of conflict in Somalia — described as “among the most climate-vulnerable countries in the world” — have been magnified by a series of severe droughts, which adds pressure to the country’s state-building process and makes UNSOM’s work more challenging in a number of ways.

For instance, the frequency and severity of conflicts between herders and farmers in the country’s rural regions have increased as changing seasons and weather means herding nomads have to adjust their routes.

Droughts and floods also displace more people, who seek shelter in camps which then serve as recruitment grounds for radical groups like al-Shabaab.

The displacement of large groups into new areas can also undermine the governance of those areas, as existing power-sharing agreements no longer represent the “demographic composition” on the ground.

While Krampe was hesitant to say that climate change by itself could cause conflict, he thought the evidence was clear that “climate change increases the probability of conflict and of violence”.

According to the UN’s refugee agency UNHCR, some 2.6 million people are currently internally displaced in Somalia and more than 800,000 remain displaced in neighbouring countries as a result of armed conflicts and recurring droughts.

AFP

Climate Change Protesters Target BBC HQ

 

Extinction Rebellion climate protesters on Friday blocked the main entrances at the BBC’s London headquarters, with one journalist reporting that the building was on “lockdown”.

The group has carried out a wave of demonstrations in the British capital and around the world since Monday, primarily attempting to blockade city centre streets.

In the latest protest, around 50 activists set up camp in front of the main doors at the BBC’s Broadcasting House, in central London, prompting the reported shutdown.

BBC financial journalist Paul Lewis tweeted: “No one in no one out. Locked down.”

Videos of the action posted on social media showed several demonstrators had scaled an awning above the entrance and displayed the group’s flag — an hourglass symbol — on the building as staff looked on through windows from inside.

“We, the people, have decided to do your job and Tell the Truth from the BBC Broadcasting House about where we’re headed if we don’t change course,” Extinction Rebellion said in a statement on its Facebook page about the latest stunt.

“We hold you accountable for your criminal and corrupt complacency for totally marginalising the seriousness of the #PlanetaryEmergency.”

 

 

A BBC spokeswoman said the news company “already covers many climate change and environmental issues across its output”.

“We know how important these issues are to audiences and will continue to focus on them across both news and non-news programmes,” she said in a statement.

The demonstration is the latest in a week of long-planned protests by Extinction Rebellion in countries around the world to highlight what it claims is the inadequate response of governments to climate change.

The protests in Britain have seen more than 1,000 people arrested since Monday.

Thursday’s actions included an attempted “Hong Kong-style occupation” of the terminal building at London City Airport in the east of the capital, with hundreds blocking the main entrance.

One demonstrator, identified by the protest group as former Paralympic cyclist James Brown, climbed on top of a British Airways jet.

That prompted criticism from Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick who called the act “reckless, stupid and dangerous”.

Canadian PM Trudeau To Participate In Climate Change March

 

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced he will take part in a climate action march led by Swedish teen activist Greta Thunberg — as the environment emerges as a key election issue.

His main rival Conservative leader Andrew Scheer will be campaigning in Vancouver, but Friday’s rally in Montreal is expected to draw local Tory candidates as well as Trudeau.

Trudeau, who faces elections October 21, paddled up in a canoe Thursday in Sudbury, Ontario to make announce he would be marching in Montreal with thousands of other Canadians to “fight for the environment.”

“There has been an extraordinary amount of mobilization by young people and by Canadians across this country and indeed around the world calling for real action on climate change,” he said.

The Montreal event coincides with similar so-called “climate strikes” around the globe.

Schools, colleges and universities have suspended classes for the day, and the city government has encouraged staff to take the day off.

Thunberg, 16, on Monday accused world leaders in a rousing “How Dare You?” speech at the UN climate summit of betraying her generation.

“You have stolen my dreams and my childhood with your empty words,” she thundered, visibly angry and close to tears.

The teen has spurred millions of youths to protest, drawn by her steely determination despite her years.

Organizers said Thunberg also will take aim at airlines’ skyrocketing CO2 emissions in a speech outside the UN aviation agency in Montreal, which is holding its annual conference.

The International Civil Aviation Organization’s 193 member states this week are taking stock of the implementation of a climate plan unveiled at its last general assembly in 2016.

Aviation accounts for about two percent of global greenhouse gas emissions, according to the ICAO.

Under its so-called Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA), participating airlines are expected to stabilize their CO2 emissions by 2020, and buy offsetting credits thereafter if they exceed set limits.

Thunberg sailed across the Atlantic for the UN climate summit in New York specifically to avoid flying.

AFP