Ebola Containment: Nigeria Receives World Bank Commendation

World BankNigeria has clearly overcome Ebola virus disease and for the World Bank and International Monetary Fund (IMF), this is a commendable feat.

President of the World Bank, Jim Yong Kim, after a special meeting of the group and the IMF, said Nigeria has demonstrated high competence in the way the Ebola Containment was handled.

He praised the federal, state and local government and all medical workers and the private sector for working together to contain the Ebola virus in the country.

The meeting of the World Bank and IMF, which held in Washington on Thursday morning, noted sadly that the virus continues to surge in the three worst affected countries, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea.

If more countries get trapped in the spread within two years, the financial impact could reach 32.6 billion dollars by the end of 2015.

The United Nations Ebola response coordinator, Dr. David Nabarro, has said that the worst outbreak of Ebola on record can be contained if countries quickly build and staff treatment centers in West African nations hardest hit by the deadly virus.

On Wednesday, the World Health Organization said Ebola had claimed the lives of 3,879 people from among 8,033 confirmed, probable and suspected cases since it was identified in Guinea in March.

Officials with the U.S. Center for Disease Control were dispatched to study how Nigeria achieved its Ebola containment after the United States reported that Ebola had been discovered in Dallas, Texas.

The CDC Director, Tom Frieden, said in a statement, “It’s clear the nation (US) needs a quick and thorough response to its first Ebola patient” noting that “their (Nigeria’s) extensive response to a single case of Ebola shows that control is possible with rapid, focused interventions.”

Nigeria has not reported new cases since August 31. Likewise, Senegal has not reported any new Ebola cases since September 18.

According to the CDC, Nigeria reported their first case July 20 when Patrick Sawyer traveled from Liberia to Lagos, Nigeria. He exposed 72 other passengers with the virus. Nigerian health officials found everyone who had been in contact with Sawyer and developed a mobilization plan.

They reached more than 26,000 households in this process. Nigeria also established the Ebola Management Center in the process.

WHO To Hold Ebola Treatment Talks In September

EbolaThe World Health Organisation (WHO) said on Thursday that it would convene talks early next month on potential treatments and vaccines to contain the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa.

The infectious disease has killed 1,350 people among 2,473 cases in four countries – Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone – according to the United Nations Health Agency.

The WHO, earlier in August, backed the use of untested drugs on people infected with Ebola, but the scarcity of supplies has raised questions about who gets priority access to treatment.

“The consultation has been convened to gather expertise about the most promising experimental therapies and vaccines and their role in containing the Ebola outbreak in West Africa,” it said in a statement on the talks set for September 4-5 in Geneva.

More than 100 experts in pharmaceutical research, clinical management, and on ethical, legal and regulatory issues will attend the meeting at WHO headquarters, it said.

“Issues of safety and efficacy will be discussed together with innovative models for expediting clinical trials. Possible ways to ramp up production of the most promising products will also be explored,” the WHO said.

ZMapp, a trial drug made by U.S. biotech company, Mapp Biopharmaceutical, has been used on six patients to date, but supplies are now exhausted, WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl said.

They include two American aid workers who have recovered, a Spanish priest who died and three Liberian medical workers, he said. Two of the Liberians have shown “marked improvement”, while the third, a doctor, remains in serious condition but has improved somewhat, the WHO statement said.

Ebola: U.S. Hospital Discharge Doctor Treated With Experimental Drug

Experimental DrugThe two US aid workers infected with the Ebola virus in Liberia have recovered and have been discharged from hospital.

Dr. Kent Brantly, 33, thanked supporters for their prayers at a news conference in Atlanta.

Nancy Writebol, 59, was discharged on Tuesday.

The two were taken to the US for treatment three weeks ago.

“Today is a miraculous day,” said Dr Brantly, who appeared healthy, although pallid, as he addressed reporters on Thursday at Emory University Hospital.

“I am thrilled to be alive, to be well, and to be reunited with my family. As a medical missionary, I never imagined myself in this position.”

He said Ebola “was not on the radar” when he and his family moved to Liberia in October.

After his family returned to the US as the Ebola outbreak tore through West Africa, he continued to treat Ebola patients and woke up on July 23 feeling “under the weather”.

Dr. Brantly said that he was in bed for nine days, getting progressively sicker and weaker. On August 1, he was flown to Atlanta for treatment at Emory.

Emory Infectious Disease Specialist, Dr Bruce Ribner, said that after rigorous treatment and testing, officials were confident Dr. Brantly had recovered “and he can return to his family, his community and his life without public health concerns”.

The group for which he was working in Liberia, Samaritan’s Purse, said that they were celebrating his recovery.

“Today I join all of our Samaritan’s Purse team around the world in giving thanks to God as we celebrate Dr Kent Brantly’s recovery from Ebola and release from the hospital,” Franklin Graham said in a statement.

Nancy Writebol’s husband, David, said in a statement that she was free of the virus but was significantly weakened.

The family decided to leave the hospital privately in order to allow her to rest and recuperate.

Meanwhile, South Africa, on Thursday, said that non-citizens arriving from Ebola-affected areas of West Africa – the countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone – would not be allowed into the country.

There is no cure for Ebola, one of the deadliest diseases known to humans, with a fatality rate of 50-60%.

Both Dr. Brantly and Mrs Writebol received an experimental drug known as ZMapp. The drug, which has only been made in extremely limited qualities, had never been tested on humans and it remained unclear if it was responsible for their recovery.

ZMapp was also given to a Spanish priest, who died, and three Liberian health workers, who are showing signs of improvement.

The outbreak has killed more than 1,300 people in West Africa, with many of the deaths occurring in Liberia.