UN Raises $370 Million For 2021 Emergency Fund

In this file photograph taken on September 5, 2018, Palestinian schoolchildren raise the victory gesture over a UN flag during a protest at a United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) school, financed by US aid, in the Arroub refugee camp near Hebron in the occupied West Bank.(Photo by HAZEM BADER / AFP)

 

The United Nations announced Tuesday it has raised more than $370 million for its emergency fund to help respond to crises in 2021.

More than 50 donors pledged money to the UN Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF), managed by the under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs, Mark Lowcock, according to a statement.

The donors were not identified.

“This fund is one of the fastest ways to help people trapped both in sudden-onset and deteriorating crises, as well as underfunded ones that are not at the top of the world’s radar,” said UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres during a videoconference of donors held at the body’s headquarters.

Created in 2005, the fund “has helped millions of people get food, health care, shelter and protection this year,” Lowcock said.

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In 2020, CERF helped 65 million people in 52 countries and territories, for a total amount of more than $900 million. The money was used to fight the Covid-19 pandemic and other diseases, as well as for relief from conflicts or natural disasters, or to avoid famine, according to the statement.

The donors’ conference for the emergency fund comes a few days after the UN published its estimate of humanitarian needs for 160 million people in 2021, a total of $35 billion.

AFP

Reps Ask FG To Set Up N15bn COVID-19 Emergency Fund For Tertiary Institutions

A section of some members of House of Reps at plenary on May 19, 2020.

 

The House of Representatives has called on the Federal government to set up a strategic N15billion Coronavirus Emergency Fund for Nigerian Universities and Tertiary Institutions as part of its response to the impact of the pandemic on academic, research and administrative operations.

The House made the call as part of its resolutions at plenary on Tuesday and in response to a motion moved by Hon. Steve Azaiki over the suspension of academic activities at tertiary institutions as a result of the COVID-19.

According to Azaiki, the structure of Nigeria’s university and tertiary institutions may never remain the same especially in the absence of an effective therapy or vaccine for the COVID-19 as well as mass testing and even a new strategic infusion of federal funding.

The rep member further explained that while school enrollment translates to revenue, this revenue may be cut short considering the short-term economic and social shocks of the ‘stay-at-home’ orders coupled with difficulties of containing the virus.

Azaiki further stated that there are estimates that universities and tertiary institutions will experience at least a 15% reduction in enrollment, as many students will likely decline and postpone their enrollment in the new session.

He also noted that many parents and guardians who may have lost their jobs due to the pandemic may be unable to afford tuition for their wards to continue going to school and therefore, pursuing higher education may become a thing of luxury.

Among other things, Rep Azaiki raised concerns about the need to ensure the provision of appropriate student support scheme (COVID–19 Student Emergency Grant) for those affected by the impact of the pandemic physically, economically and mentally, especially the vulnerable students’ groups e.g. persons living with disabilities, students with trauma or mental health issues, refugees or displaced persons within the tertiary education system.

He made reference to the United States, saying that the government recently provided the sum of $14.3Billion for higher education, with $12.4Billion split between emergency grants to student and money to colleges for expenses directly related to coronavirus and the disruption of campus operations, as $1Billion would be targeted at historically black colleges and universities, while $300 million will be given to colleges most affected by coronavirus.

Hon. Ndudi Godwin Elumelu, Hon. Muktar Betara Aliyu, Hon. Fred Obua, Hon. Francis Ottah Agbo, Hon. Makwe Livinus, Hon. Umana Aniekan, Hon. Olaide Adewale Akinremi, Hon. Kabiru I.Tukura, and Hon. Mahmud Abdullahi Gaya all sponsored the motion.

Consequently, the House reached a resolution, urging the Federal Government to set up a strategic N15Billion Naira Coronavirus Emergency Fund for Nigerian Universities and Tertiary Institutions.

It also urged Nigerian Universities and Tertiary Institutions to launch a Coronavirus Student Emergency Fund, where indigent and vulnerable students can apply for student emergency grant to assist them recover from the economic impact of the COVID–19 pandemic.

Furthermore, the House urged the Government to immediately establish an Infectious Diseases Research Institute in six selected government universities across the six geo-political zones of the country, which will be given specific research funding by the FG.

They also called on the Federal Government to empower some special universities to build the capacity to do the required testing so as to meet up with the national demand on testing due to rising number of coronavirus cases.

As the world continues to seek solutions to the COVID-19, the reps urged the Federal Government to constitute a team that will comprise of representatives of the government, academia and relevant stakeholders to undertake a study tour to Madagascar and Senegal to explore the reported progress in indigenous research into a possible cure for the virus and bring back relevant knowledge to the country.