Doctors Say Sydney Bushfire Haze A ‘Public Health Emergency’

 

Australia’s biggest city is facing a “public health emergency” over the bushfire smoke that has choked Sydney for weeks, leading doctors warned Monday after hospitals reported a dramatic spike in casualty department visits.

Hundreds of climate change-fuelled bushfires have been raging across Australia for months, with efforts to contain a “mega-blaze” burning north of Sydney destroying an estimated 20 homes overnight and fires near Perth threatening towns.

More than 20 medical groups including the Royal Australasian College of Physicians — which represents 25,000 doctors and trainees — released a joint statement Monday calling on Australia’s government to address the toxic air pollution.

“The air pollution in NSW is a public health emergency,” the Climate and Health Alliance said.

“Smoke from bushfires has produced air pollution of up to 11 times the base ‘hazardous’ level in parts of Sydney and New South Wales.

Read Also: Toxic Bushfire Haze Blankets Eastern Australia

“Bushfire smoke is particularly hazardous because of the high levels of tiny particles (PM2.5).”

The New South Wales state health department said it recorded a 48 percent increase in the number of people visiting hospital emergency rooms with respiratory problems in the week ending December 11 compared to the five-year average.

Visits spiked 80 percent on December 10, when air quality plummeted across Sydney prompting up to 20,000 residents to march in protest the following day.

The Climate and Health Alliance called on the government to take urgent action to curb emissions, saying climate change is worsening bushfires that are having “devastating impacts on human health”.

“The air pollution events resulting from bushfires will become more and more frequent and are a result of climate change,” it said.

“Our governments must act quickly to rapidly and deeply reduce greenhouse gas emissions, which we know are driving climate change.”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison last week made a rare admission that climate change is one of the “factors” behind the fires, but defended Australia’s record on emissions reduction and failed to announce further measures to address the issue.

‘Heartbreaking’

Six people have been killed, more than 700 houses destroyed and at least three million hectares (7.4 million acres) of land burned this bushfire season.

More than 100 fires are currently burning in New South Wales, where efforts to contain a 400,000-hectare blaze near Sydney using backburning are believed to have sparked another fire that destroyed an estimated 20 homes.

A New South Wales Rural Fire and Rescue Service spokeswoman told AFP the fire was “likely the result of embers from the backburning operation” but that work had been “absolutely critical” and many more homes could have been lost without it.

The devastating fires have focused attention on climate change, with scientists saying the blazes have come earlier and with more intensity than usual due to global warming and a prolonged drought that has also caused towns to run out of drinking water and forced farmers off their land.

More than 35,000 people living in a drought-stricken area of southern Queensland will be restricted to using a maximum of 80 litres (21 US gallons) of water each per day under “emergency” rules from Thursday, as local authorities begin trucking in water from other regions.

“The rain has gone around us now for three years. It’s been heartbreaking,” Southern Downs Council mayor Tracy Dobie told ABC.

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg on Monday singled out bushfires and drought as the biggest domestic challenges for the economy, telling reporters in Canberra the dry spell had taken a quarter of a percentage point off GDP growth and reduced farm output by “a significant amount” over the past two years.

Official data shows 2019 is on track to be one of the hottest and driest years on record in Australia, with the country set to experience a heatwave this week that forecasters predict will break temperature records — and firefighters say will make their job even tougher.

Chile President To Lift State Of Emergency Amid Protests

Demonstrators clash with security forces during a demonstration in Valparaiso, Chile on October 27, 2019.  Raúl Goycoolea / AFP

 

Embattled Chilean President Sebastian Pinera announced on Sunday that a state of emergency that has lasted more than a week amid mass protests would be lifted at midnight.

The decision, just two days after more than a million people took to the country’s streets demanding economic and political change, comes after the equally unpopular week-long nighttime curfews ended on Saturday.

Authorities imposed both the state of emergency and curfews last weekend after Chile was rocked by its worst civil unrest in decades.

What originated as a student protest against a modest hike in metro fares quickly got out of control as demonstrations turned deadly.

A message on the presidency’s official Twitter account said the state of emergency, which had seen 20,000 soldiers and police deployed on the streets, would end “in all the regions and towns where it was established.”

This measure comes a day after Pinera said he’d “asked all ministers to resign in order to form a new government.”

“We are in a new reality,” Pinera said on Saturday. “Chile is different from what it was a week ago.”

The government has been struggling to craft an effective response to the protests and a growing list of economic and political demands that include Pinera’s resignation.

The breadth and ferocity of the demonstrations appeared to have caught the government of Chile — long one of Latin America’s richest and most stable countries — off guard.

By Saturday afternoon, the military presence in the capital Santiago had been already visibly reduced.

The week of unrest began with an initial burst of violence as protesters and looters destroyed metro stations, torched supermarkets, smashed traffic lights and bus stops, and erected burning street barricades.

At least 19 people died in the worst political violence since Chile returned to democracy after the Augusto Pinochet dictatorship from 1973-90.

AFP

State Of Emergency Declared As California Fires Spread

 

 

California’s governor declared a state-wide emergency on Sunday as a huge wind-fueled blaze forced evacuations and massive power blackouts, threatening tourist towns in the state’s famed Sonoma wine region.

The so-called Kincade Fire, north of San Francisco, spread to 30,000 acres (12,000 hectares) overnight, with only 10 percent containment by early afternoon Sunday, state fire authorities said.

The blaze, the largest of more than a dozen wildfires burning throughout the state, has destroyed dozens of homes and wineries, including the iconic Soda Rock Winery built in 1869.

“We’ve seen the news. We are devastated,” the owners said in a Facebook message, adding that all staff at the winery were safe.

The Kincade Fire — the most devastating in California this year — ignited Wednesday and spread quickly thanks to powerful wind gusts up to 90 miles per hour (145 kilometers per hour).

Governor Gavin Newsom declared a statewide emergency on Sunday due to the “unprecedented” high winds that have led to the fires.

“We are deploying every resource available, and are coordinating with numerous agencies as we continue to respond to these fires,” Newsom said in a statement. “It is critical that people in evacuation zones heed the warnings from officials and first responders, and have the local and state resources they need as we fight these fires.”

An estimated 180,000 people were under mandatory evacuation orders, including parts of Santa Rosa and a large swath of Sonoma County all the way to the Pacific Ocean.

“This is the largest evacuation that any of us at the Sheriff’s Office can remember. Take care of each other,” the Sonoma County sheriff’s office tweeted.

Authorities said the area would remain under dangerous red flag conditions until Monday morning.

“Things will improve as we head into Monday and Tuesday but we need to be resilient as it looks like we have another north wind event, another dry event that is going to impact the region Tuesday night into Wednesday,” a spokesman for the National Weather Service told a news conference.

– Thousands battle blaze –
A fire official warned that should the flames continue spreading west and jump over a major freeway — the 101 — that could prove even more catastrophic as that region hasn’t had any fires since the 1940s.

“The fuels in that area are extremely dense, they are extremely old and decadent and they are extremely dry,” he said, referring to combustible material, including shrubs and trees that feed a fire.

More than 3,000 firefighters backed by air tankers and helicopters were battling to control the blaze, which was not expected to be contained before November 7, fire officials said.

Several other fires have erupted throughout the state in the last week, fueled by high winds, bone-dry conditions and temperatures in the 80s and 90s Fahrenheit.

One major fire — the Tick Fire — in the southern part of the state, north of Los Angeles, also prompted evacuations and destroyed a number of homes near Santa Clarita.

But on Sunday, most evacuation orders were lifted as some 1,000 firefighters worked to contain the fire that burned more than 4,500 acres.

In a bid to reduce the risk of fire, California’s largest utility, Pacific Gas & Electric Co., said it expected to turn off power to nearly one million customers across northern and central California.

“Winds of this magnitude pose a higher risk of damage and sparks on the electric system and rapid wildfire spread,” the company said in a statement. “The fire risk is even higher because vegetation on the ground has been dried out by recent wind events.”

PG&E has come under intense scrutiny after it emerged that one of its transmissions lines may have played a role in the Kincade Fire.

The same type of line was responsible for California’s deadliest wildfire ever — last year’s Camp Fire, which killed 86 people.

PG&E, which filed for bankruptcy protection earlier this year, has been blamed for several other fires in the state in recent years.

Newsom hit out at the utility earlier this week, saying he was infuriated that a state such as California — which boasts the fifth-largest economy in the world — had to endure blackouts.

Trump Declares State Of Emergency As Storm Bears Down On New Orleans

 

US President Donald Trump has declared a state of emergency as Tropical Storm Barry bears down on New Orleans, as the southern city braces for extreme winds over the weekend.

The weather system is expected to reach hurricane strength Friday or early Saturday when it nears Louisiana’s coast, according to the National Hurricane Center (NHC), and has already caused major flooding in the low-lying city.

Trump on Thursday issued a national disaster declaration, which will allow federal agencies to participate in emergency relief efforts, in response to a request by Louisiana governor John Bel Edwards.

“Thank you President Trump for quickly responding to my request… We appreciate the support of the White House and our federal partners as we continue our unprecedented flood fight,” the governor said in a tweet Thursday.

The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) separately announced that it would temporarily halt immigration enforcement activity in areas subject to the state of emergency.

It said that the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency would not target migrant families who were evacuating during the storm, ahead of sweeping operations nationwide to detain and deport illegal immigrants expected to start this weekend.

“Our highest priority remains the preservation of life and safety. In consideration of these circumstances, there will be no immigration enforcement initiatives associated with evacuations or sheltering related to the storm, except in the event of a serious public safety threat,” the agency said in a Thursday press release.

The incoming storm has evoked memories of Hurricane Katrina, the costliest and deadliest hurricane in US history, which submerged about 80 percent of New Orleans as the city’s flood defenses gave way.

Katrina also pounded other parts of Louisiana as well as Mississippi and Alabama, leading to about 1,800 deaths and more than $150 billion in damage.

AFP

Sri Lanka Extends Emergency A Month After Suicide Bombings

Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena delivers a speech/ AFP

 

Sri Lanka’s president extended on Wednesday by a further month the state of emergency imposed immediately after the Easter Sunday Islamist bombings that killed 258 people.

Maithripala Sirisena issued a proclamation saying that the emergency, which gives sweeping powers to security forces to arrest and detain suspects for long periods of time, would continue for another 30 days, citing “public security”.

Sri Lanka initially imposed the emergency to crack down on local jihadists blamed for the April 21 bombings that targeted three churches and three luxury hotels.

READ ALSO: Thousands May Lose Their Jobs As British Steel Collapses

Three weeks after the suicide bombings, anti-Muslim riots broke out in a province north of the capital in a backlash against the attacks. At least one Muslim man was killed and hundreds of Muslim-owned shops and homes were destroyed. Several mosques were also vandalised.

The police and the military say they have arrested scores of suspects, both in connection with the bombings and over what appeared to be organised violence against the Muslim minority.

The authorities say they have neutralised the jihadist threat after arresting almost all those involved in the Easter attacks, but troops and police remain on alert across the island.

Christians make up 7.6 per cent and Muslims 10 per cent of mainly Buddhist Sri Lanka.

AFP

Sudan Cuts State Of Emergency To Six Months Over Protests

Sudanese protesters chant slogans during an anti-government demonstration in the capital Khartoum’s twin city of Omdurman / AFP

 

Sudan’s parliament on Monday approved a nationwide state of emergency of six months instead of one year as ordered by President Omar al-Bashir to quell protests against his iron-fisted rule.

Bashir declared a year-long state of emergency from February 22 after an initial crackdown failed to suppress the demonstrations that have rocked his administration for nearly three months.

“A six-month state of emergency has been approved by a majority,” the speaker of parliament Ibrahim Ahmed Omer said after lawmakers voted on the presidential decree.

READ ALSO: Crashed Ethiopian Airlines Black Box Recovered

Deadly protests erupted on December 19 after a government decision to triple the price of bread.

The demonstrations quickly escalated into nationwide rallies against Bashir’s administration, with analysts calling it the biggest challenge to his rule stretching back three decades.

Officials say 31 people have died in protest-related violence so far, while Human Rights Watch has given a death toll of at least 51 including medics and children.

Monday’s vote by lawmakers backed a recommendation from a parliamentary committee to shorten the state of emergency to six months.

Activists and rights groups have slammed the measure as curbing freedoms in the country.

“The parliament didn’t want to reject Bashir’s decree, so it came out with a compromise by keeping the state of emergency for six months,” said prominent Sudanese human rights defender Nabil Adib.

“But to me, it’s not about six months or one year. The measure violates human rights that are permitted in the Sudanese constitution.”

Sudan’s Minister of Justice Mohamed Ahmed Salim defended the state of emergency in parliament, which is overwhelmingly dominated by lawmakers from the ruling National Congress Party.

“What we have is a soft state of emergency and still people are complaining,” he said.

 Protesters jailed 

Bashir has also issued a slew of tough measures to end the protests, banning unauthorised rallies and setting up special emergency courts to investigate offences.

He has also given sweeping powers to security forces to carry out raids and searches.

Scores of protesters have appeared before the emergency courts already and several have been jailed, while nine women have received sentences of 20 lashes each for joining rallies.

On Sunday, a top opposition leader was sentenced to a week in jail as she tried to participate in a march on parliament to challenge the state of emergency.

Mariam al-Mahdi, the deputy chief of the main opposition Umma Party, said she will spend a total of three weeks in jail after refusing to pay a fine of 2,000 Sudanese pounds ($42).

Bashir swept to power in an Islamist-backed coup in 1989 that toppled the government of Sadiq al-Mahdi, chief of the Umma Party and father of Mariam.

Although the protests erupted after the rise in bread prices, anger had been mounting across the country for years amid a growing economic crisis.

Bashir, 75, has defied protesters’ calls for him to step down but has dissolved the federal and provincial governments.

The president also handed over his powers as chief of the ruling National Congress Party to his deputy, Ahmed Harun.

Bashir has appointed 16 army officers and two security officers from the feared National Intelligence and Security Service as governors of the country’s 18 provinces, a move criticised by the United States and others as “return to military rule.”

AFP

US House To Vote On Blocking Trump Emergency

US President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, DC on February 12, 2019. MANDEL NGAN / AFP

 

US House lawmakers on Tuesday are expected to pass a Democratic measure annulling President Donald Trump’s declared emergency on the southern border, an effort that appeared to earn growing support among Senate Republicans.

Trump’s February 15 emergency declaration gives him access to billions of dollars to construct his wall on the Mexican border, beyond the nearly $1.4 billion that Congress allocated for construction of border barriers.

But the House of Representatives, run since January by Democrats, has the support necessary to terminate the emergency, dealing a stern rebuke to a president controversially seeking to expand his executive powers.

Should the measure clear Congress and reach his desk, Trump would be cornered into issuing the first veto of his presidency, an embarrassing development because the measure seeks to directly rein in the president’s authority.

The House vote, expected Tuesday afternoon, will serve to “defend our democracy,” Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Monday.

Trump’s top Democratic rival in Congress warned that his emergency order was tantamount to an unconstitutional attempt to seize executive authority by taking lawmaker’s power to control how federal funds are spent.

“The president’s power grab usurps that responsibility and fundamentally violates the balance of power envisioned by our founders,” said Pelosi, who has noted that the measure already has 226 supporters in the 435-member body.

After clearing the House, the measure would receive a vote in the US Senate. Republicans control the chamber, 53-47, but several senators in Trump’s party returned to Washington after a one-week break to express deep reservations about Trump’s end run around Congress to obtain wall funding.

Trump sought to head them off early Monday, saying he hoped Republicans “don’t get led down the path of weak and ineffective Border Security.”

“Be strong and smart,” Trump tweeted. “Don’t fall into the Democrats ‘trap’ of Open Borders and Crime!”

 ‘Creating another’ problem 

Trump and the White House have pressed on with plans to repurpose more than $6 billion from other sources, mostly already-allocated funds in the Defense Department budget.

He has repeatedly declared that rampant illegal immigration is fuelling a border crisis, leading to higher crime and strains on public services.

Two key groups — dozens of Republican former lawmakers, and a bipartisan group of former national security officers including secretaries of defense and CIA directors — spoke out strongly against the emergency declaration.

In open letters Monday, they warned of an abuse of the framework of the US Constitution.

“Under no plausible assessment of the evidence is there a national emergency today that entitles the president to tap into funds appropriated for other purposes to build a wall at the southern border,” said the 58 national security officials, who include former secretaries of state Madeleine Albright and John Kerry, and George W. Bush’s undersecretary of state Nicholas Burns.

As pressure in Washington mounted, some Republican lawmakers appeared to buckle.

GOP Senator Thom Tillis said in a column that while Trump is “rightfully frustrated with Congress’s inaction” on border security, the president made a mistake declaring an emergency and Tillis will support the Democrats’ resolution of disapproval.

“I have grave concerns when our institution looks the other way at the expense of weakening Congress’s power,” he wrote in The Washington Post.

Senators Lisa Murkowski and Susan Collins have also signalled their likelihood to support the resolution.

“The emergency course is not one I favor,” Senator Mitt Romney told reporters.

“I don’t think you solve one problem by creating another one, which is taking money out of military construction — and there’s a separation of powers (issues) as well,” added Senator Marco Rubio.

“I don’t like it, and my vote will reflect that.”

If all Senate Democrats support the resolution, only four Republicans would be needed for it to pass the Senate.

Trump has said he is “100 percent” certain to issue a veto, deepening a political showdown on Capitol Hill and setting up a series of legal battles.

Republicans have said Democrats likely do not have the votes — two-thirds majorities required in both chambers — to override a Trump veto.

AFP

Bashir Declares Year-Long State Of Emergency Across Sudan

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir/ AFP

 

Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir declared a nationwide state of emergency on Friday and dissolved the government, in an effort to quell weeks of demonstrations that have rocked his iron-fisted rule of three decades.

“I announce imposing a state of emergency across the country for one year,” Bashir said in a televised address to the nation.

READ ALSO: Four Killed In Suspected Terrorist Attack In Niger

“I announce dissolving the government at the federal level and at the provincial levels,” he added.

AFP

US States Sue Trump Over Border Wall Emergency

US President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, DC on February 12, 2019. MANDEL NGAN / AFP

 

Sixteen US states sued President Donald Trump’s administration Monday over his decision to declare a national emergency to fund a wall on the southern border with Mexico, saying the move violated the constitution.

Trump announced the emergency Friday in order to bypass Congress, which approved only a quarter of the $5.6 billion he wanted for the wall in a spending bill.

But the lawsuit, filed in a federal court in California, said the president’s order was contrary to the constitution’s presentment and appropriations clauses, which outline legislative procedures and define Congress as the final arbiter of public funds, respectively.

The move had already been announced by Xavier Becerra, the attorney general of California, who said Sunday his state and others had legal standing because they risked losing amounts of money intended for military projects, disaster assistance, and other purposes.

Critics, including several senators from Trump’s Republican party, have warned that he has opened the door for future presidents to call on the act whenever they fail to get their way with Congress.

READ ALSO: Europeans Reject Trump’s Call To Repatriate Syria Jihadists

Should the states prevail, the case could work its way up to the Supreme Court, setting up a precedent-setting showdown on the separation of powers.

 ‘Constitutional crisis’ 

California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Minnesota, Nevada, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, and Virginia are party to the complaint seeking an injunction.

The states “bring this action to protect their residents, natural resources, and economic interests from President Donald J. Trump’s flagrant disregard of fundamental separation of powers principles ingrained in the United States Constitution,” the complaint said.

It added that Trump had veered the country toward a “constitutional crisis of his own making.”

“Congress has repeatedly rebuffed the president’s insistence to fund a border wall, recently resulting in a record 35-day partial government shutdown over the border wall dispute,” it said.

“After the government reopened, Congress approved, and the president signed into law, a $1.375 billion appropriation for fencing along the southern border, but Congress made clear that funding could not be used to build President Trump’s proposed border wall.”

 Endangered species 

The complaint also questioned Trump’s categorization of illegal border crossings as a national emergency, saying data issued by his own administration refuted the notion.

“Customs and Border Protection (“CBP”) data show that unlawful entries are near 45-year lows,” it said.

“The State Department recognizes there is a lack of credible evidence that terrorists are using the southern border to enter the United States. Federal data confirm that immigrants are less likely to commit crimes than are native-born Americans.”

The White House says the emergency order empowers it to pull around $6.6 billion from other sources, mostly already-allocated funds in the Defense Department budget.

But the lawsuit countered that tapping military funds would result in huge losses for the states’ national guard units which would otherwise use the money for domestic drug interdiction and counter-drug activities as well as for law enforcement programs.

The complaint added that the Department of Homeland Security had violated the National Environmental Policy Act by failing to evaluate the environmental impact of the wall in California and New Mexico, saying species such as the endangered Mexican gray wolf, and the jaguar would be at risk.

AFP

Burkina Faso Declares Emergency Over Violence

Burkina Faso on the map.

 

Burkina Faso is declaring a state of emergency in provinces grappling with jihadist violence, Communications Minister Remis Fulgance Dandjinou said on Monday.

“The president has decided to declare a state of emergency in certain provinces of Burkina Faso. He has also given instructions for specific security measures across the country,” Dandjinou said after a cabinet meeting that followed a deadly attack on police.

Ten gendarmes were killed and three wounded on Thursday in an ambush in the northwest of the country, near the border with Mali.

They had been heading to the village of Loroni after a school had been attacked and textbooks torched by armed assailants, a security source told AFP.

The state of emergency applies to a number of provinces that lie within seven of the country’s 13 administrative regions, Dandjinou said.

The regions are Hauts-Bassins, Boucle du Mouhoun, Cascades, North and Sahel, in the west and north of the country, and the East and Centre-East in the east.

Names of the provinces where the state of emergency is to be applied will be made public in a presidential decree, he said.

A state of emergency gives additional powers to the security forces to carry out searches of homes and to restrict freedom of movement.

The impoverished Sahel state has been battling a rising wave of jihadist attacks over the last three years.

They began in the north of the country but have since spread to the east, near the border with Togo and Benin.

Most attacks are attributed to the jihadist group Ansarul Islam, which emerged near the Mali border in December 2016, and to the JNIM (the Group to Support Islam and Muslims), which has sworn allegiance to Al-Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb.

Those groups are believed to be responsible for more than 255 deaths since 2015.

The capital Ouagadougou has been hit three times and almost 60 people have died there.

AFP

NEMA Opens New Offices In Kano, Adamawa And Edo State

NEMA, KANO, ADAMAWA, EDOThe National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) has opened three new operation offices in Kano, Adamawa and Edo State.

The development is aimed at bringing disaster management operations closer to communities, reducing the response time to disasters in those states.

A statement issued by the Head Media and Public Relations of NEMA, Sani Datti said “NEMA is making conscious efforts to build stakeholders’ capacity and devise an appropriate mechanism to address the various facets of disaster risk reduction, namely- prevention, mitigation, preparedness, response and recovery”.

He said to achieve all this, “there is the need for cooperation and collaboration of all stakeholders at the Federal, State, Local Government and Community levels.”

The statement however expressed satisfaction over the fact that members of the public call on the agency for minor incidents.

It said “it is a testimony to the level of confidence placed on the agency by members of the public”.

Speaking on the functionalities of the new offices, the agency said “the offices will be responsible for taking disaster risk reduction to grassroots, capacity building programmes for stakeholders and coordinating government agencies and non- governmental organisations involved in the disaster management in the states”.

The agency commended the efforts of the Kano and Adamawa State governments for donating office spaces and warehouses to facilitate the opening up of the operation offices in both states.

With the creation of Adamawa, Kano and Edo operation offices, the agency now has a total of nine offices and six zonal offices across the country.

Ambode Commissions Helipad At LASUTH, Says To Be Used As Life Saving Asset

Cancer, Akinwunmi AmbodeLagos State Governor, Akinwunmi Ambode on Thursday commissioned a Helipad at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH),

While commissioning the facility, Governor Ambode, who said it will be a life saving asset, maintained that the need for a helipad had become necessary to complement other emergency services within the state.

He further stated that the facility would be operated by specially trained personnel, who will offer a 24-hour service.

The governor also mentioned that the Helipad would be located in LASUTH, Given her reputation as the State Tertiary Health Institution, offering referrals to other state and private medical institutions.

He said the usual movement by road is not the best option and has guaranteed the public that there would be expert medical care during emergency transfer and also safe landing at all times.

Governor Ambode also inspected abandoned as well as on-going projects, including the upgrading of 247-bed and five theatre suits for pregnant women to be ready for use by the first quarter of 2017.