Brazil Announces Equal Pay For Male And Female National Football Teams

File photo: Brazil’s Dani Alves (C) and teammates celebrates with the trophy after winning the Copa America after defeating Peru in the final match of the football tournament at Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, on July 7, 2019. Carl DE SOUZA / AFP

 

Brazil’s football federation announced on Wednesday it will pay men and women the same amount for representing the national team, one of the few countries to make such a pledge.

“The CBF has equalled the prize money and allowances between men’s and women’s football, which means the women players will earn the same as the men,” said the federation’s president Rogerio Caboclo.

It means Brazil’s little known female players such as Marta, Formiga and Leticia Santos will receive the same fees and allowances as global superstars such as Neymar, Gabriel Jesus and Roberto Firmino.

Australia, Norway and New Zealand are amongst the nations to previously decide to pay their men and women internationals the same amount.

In March 2019, the US women’s team, the current world champions, sued their federation alleging discrimination over pay and conditions.

A judge dismissed their case in May this year but the team appealed.

Brazil’s football association CBF said its decision was communicated to the women’s team and their Swedish coach Pia Sundhage in March.

“This is historic. Being a part of this is very special, I’m very grateful,” said Sundhage, who also welcomed the news that for the first time a woman, Duda Luizelli, has been put in charge of coordinating the national women’s team.

Equal pay was first applied back in March when Brazil took part in the invitational Tournoi de France, finishing last out of four sides.

The measure will be applied to the national teams participating in the Olympic Games to be held in Tokyo next year, as well as the next men’s and women’s World Cup tournaments.

“It will be proportionally the same as what FIFA proposes for women, that is to say, there will be no more gender difference in remuneration between men and women,” said Caboclo, the federation president.

The men’s team is the most successful in football having won the World Cup a record five times.

They have also won their continental championship, the Copa America, nine times, most recently on home soil in 2019.

But the women’s team is also amongst the strongest in the game, having reached the World Cup final in 2007 and back-to-back Olympic finals in 2004 and 2008.

The CBF said later in a statement that equal pay was “part of the journey of transformation” towards equality in football, the most popular sport in the country, which has 36 professional clubs.

Last year, the Brazilian professional league also authorized equal prize money for women and men.

However, when it comes to club football, the gap in pay between men and women, not just in Brazil but all over the world, remains huge.

The highest-paid players in the women’s game earn six-figure salaries, while male players such as Barcelona’s Lionel Messi and Cristiano Ronaldo of Juventus take home sums more than 100 times greater.

AFP

‘Let’s climb!’ Female Stars Call For Equal Pay In Cannes Protest

'Let's climb!' Female Stars Call For Equal Pay In Cannes Protest
Filmmakers, actresses and producers hold hands after Australian actress and President of the Jury Cate Blanchett read a statement on the red carpet in protest of the lack of female filmmakers honoured throughout the history of the festival. Photo: Anne-Christine POUJOULAT / AFP

 

Hollywood stars including Cate Blanchett, Kristen Stewart and Salma Hayek called Saturday for equal pay in the cinema industry and beyond in a historic red carpet protest at the Cannes film festival.

Eighty-two actresses, filmmakers and producers marched arm and arm to demand equality and “a safe workplace”, seven months after the world was shaken by the #MeToo movement and the fall of mogul Harvey Weinstein.

The ranks included a battalion of Oscar winners from Helen Mirren and Marion Cotillard to US blockbuster directors Ava DuVernay and Patty Jenkins who made “Wonder Woman”.

“We demand that our workplaces are diverse and equitable so they can best reflect the world in which we live,” said Blanchett in a statement read out with the legendary 89-year-old French director Agnes Varda.

Blanchett, a double Oscar winner, said they wanted “a world that allows all of us in front and behind the camera to thrive shoulder to shoulder with our male colleagues.”

With Cannes under fire for its dearth of women directors, the world’s top film festival hoped to fend off some of the fierce criticism with the march.

The number of protesters was highly symbolic as it represented the 82 films by female directors who have competed for the top Palme d’Or prize since 1946 — a number dwarfed by the nearly 1,700 male contenders.

The star-studded group stopped halfway up the stairs to the Palais des Festivals to mark the obstacles they face in trying to reach the top.

Women in suits

“The stairs of our industry must be accessible to all. Let’s climb,” Blanchett declared, with some of the rally’s participants visibly moved.

The Australian actress also head the female-majority jury that will decide the festival’s top prize.

Several protestors including Stewart made a strong fashion statement by donning suits and tuxedos, in a show of defiance to Cannes’ red-carpet dress code which is often denounced as sexist.

Women have been stopped from entering premieres in the past for not wearing high heels.

Producer and activist Melissa Silverstein of Women and Hollywood hailed the event as a “massive milestone towards change”.

“An honour to share the carpet with @Ava (DuVernay) and all the other women who are pushing for more opportunities for women,” she said in a tweet after the march.

The protest took place ahead of the premiere of “Girls of the Sun” by Eva Husson, one of only three women out of 21 directors in the running for the Palme d’Or.

The film is the story of the Kurdish Yazidi all-female Sun Brigade who are fighting Islamic State jihadists in Syria and Iraq, where thousands of women were kept as slaves.

The protest comes at the first Cannes festival since the cinema industry was engulfed by the spiralling sex abuse allegations against Weinstein.

Cannes was the scene of several of the disgraced Hollywood mogul’s alleged attacks on actresses.

In response, the festival set up an anti-harassment hotline this year.

The number has already received “several calls” since the festival’s launch on May 9, said French Equality Minister Marlene Schiappa.

Cannes “must be a safe space for women,” she stressed.

Australian actress and President of the Jury Cate Blanchett poses as she arrives on May 12, 2018 for the screening of the film "Girls of the Sun (Les Filles du Soleil)" at the 71st edition of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France. LOIC VENANCE / AFP
Australian actress and President of the Jury Cate Blanchett poses as she arrives on May 12, 2018, for the screening of the film “Girls of the Sun (Les Filles du Soleil)” at the 71st edition of the Cannes Film Festival in Cannes, southern France.
LOIC VENANCE / AFP

‘Disturbing’ depictions

Blanchett has criticised Cannes for once again failing to invite more female directors.

“There are many women on the jury but I wish there were more in competition,” the Australian-born star told French radio earlier this week.

The 48-year-old has emerged as a key figure in Hollywood’s fight against sexual misconduct.

One of the first women to call out Weinstein, Blanchett co-founded the “Time’s Up” movement to support abuse victims.

Her comments echo those of fellow actress Jessica Chastain who served on the jury last year and lambasted Cannes for its “disturbing” depiction of women.

Chastain caused a stir on Thursday when she revealed that she planned to make Hollywood’s first big-budget all-female blockbuster with a cast including Penelope Cruz and Lupita Nyong’o.

Only seven percent of Hollywood blockbusters were directed by women in 2016.

France has the best ratio among the major film-producing countries with 23 percent of films directed by women.

AFP