My Facebook and Twitter accounts have been hacked – Dbanj

Popular Nigeria singer, Dbanj whose real name is Daniel Dapo Oyebanjo on Wednesday said that his Twitter and Facebook accounts have been hacked by unknown persons.
Dbanj’s publicist who disclosed this in a press statement said that the hackers misrepresented information about the singer.

“Over the past few weeks Dapo Daniel Oyebanjo aka D’Banj has experienced a series of vicious hacks on several of his social networking sites including his Facebook page and more recently, his Twitter of which his account name was wrongfully changed,” the statement reads.

“Unfortunately the hackers managed to carry out a number of hurtful, damaging activities directly aimed to deceive D’Banj’s fans with false information.

“With the help of the security teams at both Twitter and Facebook, we have managed to regain full control of the said sites which are currently being operated personally by D’Banj.

“Fans can continue to interact with D’Banj at his official Twitter handle @IamDbanj and his official Facebook pagehttps://www.facebook.com/DBanj. Dapo Daniel Oyebanjo is known and celebrated worldwide for his originality and distinctive sound and is committed to staying true to that foundation.

“D’Banj apologises for any inconvenience caused by the hacking and thanks his beloved fans for their continued support.”

Facebook to buy Instagram for $1 billion

Facebook will pay $1 billion in cash and stock for Instagram, a 2-year-old photo-sharing application developer, in its largest-ever acquisition just months before the No. 1 social media website is expected to go public.

Mark Zuckerberg speaks to reporters at Harvard University in Cambridge

Even in Silicon Valley, , the acquisition stood out for its steep price for an apps-maker that still lacks any significant revenue sources.

The acquisition marks a change for Facebook, which has traditionally bought small companies as a means of hiring coveted teams of engineers. Facebook typically shutters the acquired company’s product or builds similar versions that it integrates directly into the Facebook service. But Instagram will not only remain running, Facebook will build features into it as time goes by, both companies said.

The popular Instagram application, which allows users to add filters and effects to pictures taken on their iPhone and Android devices, has gained about 30 million users since it launched in January 2011.

Instagram, with roughly a dozen employees based in San Francisco, reportedly closed a $50 million funding round last week from investors including Sequoia Capital that valued the company at $500 million, according to the technology blog AllThingsD.com. The company was founded only in early 2010.

Facebook, which is expected to raise $5 billion via the largest Silicon Valley initial public offering by May, will acquire Instagram’s entire team.

“This is an important milestone for Facebook because it’s the first time we’ve ever acquired a product and company with so many users,” Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said in a blog post. “We don’t plan on doing many more of these, if any at all.”

The deal, a closely kept secret at the tiny start-up, is expected to close this quarter. CEO Kevin Systrom announced the transaction to Instagram employees at a 9 a.m. meeting on Monday, according to a source inside the company.

TAKING PAGE FROM GOOGLE’S BOOK

The Instragram deal is expected to resemble Google Inc’s $1.65 billion acquisition of video service YouTube in 2006. YouTube retains its own offices in San Bruno, California, and largely operates independently of Google.

The acquisition came as Instagram was in the process of meeting with venture capital firms about raising more funding, according to one source familiar with the matter.
“It was not long-planned,” the source said on condition of anonymity. “What happened is that Facebook must have come in with a number.”

In addition to bolstering Facebook’s photo-sharing and mobile capabilities, one side benefit of the deal for Facebook, the source noted, is that it prevents rival Twitter from acquiring the popular app.

At the same time, the deal allowed Facebook to absorb a potential emerging rival. As Instagram has shot up in popularity in recent months, the company’s leadership has mulled possible strategies to expand the service into a fully featured social network – a photo-driven, stripped-down version of Facebook, Twitter, or even Path.

With its purchase, Facebook said it would continue to develop Instagram as an independent app that remains compatible with other social networking services.

“We plan on keeping features like the ability to post to other social networks, the ability to not share your Instagrams on Facebook if you want, and the ability to have followers and follow people separately from your friends on Facebook,” Zuckerberg wrote.

Husband beats wife’s Facebook friend to death

A jealous Taiwanese husband led an assault on a Facebook user who had flirted with his wife online, beating him to death with baseball clubs, police said Monday, according to Agence France-Presse:

Chou You-huang, a 34-year-old resident of south Taiwan’s Pingtung County, told police that he had requested a meeting with the 40-year-old victim, Chuang Shih-chang, after he found out about the online relationship.

When Chuang turned up at the agreed spot outside a restaurant early Saturday morning, Chou and two of his friends attacked him with baseball bats, according to police.

The three men beat him ferociously and then left him there, believing he had not suffered life-threatening injuries, according to police statements.

The China Post reported one of the Facebook exchanges:

Chen, in a Facebook status update, wrote, “I want to get McDonalds! Which nice man will take me there?” Chuang responded: “I am about to arrive at your house!”

In his Internet posts, Chuang also frequently referred to Chen as his “wife.”

The China Post also reported that when questioned by the police, Chou said Chuang “had been drunk and had a horrible attitude and refused to admit his wrongdoings.” He further said he thought Chuang was just in a coma when they left him on the road.

New Yahoo CEO sacks 2000 employees to save $375million

In his first three months on the job, the new Yahoo chief executive officer, CEO Scott Thompson has imposed the largest layoffs in the company’s 17-year history and reshaped the board of directors.

Thompson delivered on  Wednesday, a payroll purge of about 2,000 workers, or about 14 percent of Yahoo’s 14,100 employees. The cuts will save about $375 million annually as Yahoo tries to boost its earnings and long-slumping stock price.

Thompson is Yahoo’s fourth full-time CEO in less than five years — a period marked by steady declines in revenue, even though more advertising has been shifting to the Internet.

 

Last year, Yahoo produced revenue of $353,000 per employee while its two biggest rivals, Internet search leader Google Inc. and social networking leader Facebook Inc., each generated $1.2 million per employee.

Other major technology companies were also far more productive: Microsoft Corp. had about $800,000 in revenue per employee last year, while Intel Corp. posted $540,000 in revenue per employee, according to S&P’s data.

Meanwhile, Google and Facebook are hiring even more engineers and sales representative to develop new products and sell more ads. Google added 8,000 employees last year, and Facebook recently moved to sprawling headquarters in Menlo Park, Calif., in anticipation of tripling its current workforce of about 3,200 people within the next few years.

 

 

Yahoo sues Facebook over 10 disputed patents in the US

Yahoo has filed an intellectual property lawsuit against Facebook.

Yahoo claims the social network has infringed 10 of its patents including systems and methods for advertising on the web. Facebook denies the allegation.

The move comes ahead of Facebook’s planned flotation later this year.

Patent litigation has become common between the smartphone makers, but this marks a new front in the battles between the tech giants.

A statement from Yahoo suggested the web portal believed it has a strong case.

“Yahoo’s patents relate to cutting edge innovations in online products, including in messaging, news feed generation, social commenting, advertising display, preventing click fraud and privacy controls,” its suit said.

“Facebook’s entire social network model, which allows users to create profiles and connect with, among other things, persons and businesses, is based on Yahoo’s patented social networking technology.

The social network signalled that it believed that Yahoo had not tried hard to settle the matter without involving the courts.

A statement by Facebook secured by the All Things D website read: “We’re disappointed that Yahoo’s effort to engage with us was limited to a few short phone calls and that we continue to learn of new developments about a long-time partner through the press. We will defend ourselves vigorously against these puzzling actions.”

The case has echoes of Yahoo’s decision to sue Google ahead of its flotation in 2004. That dispute centred over patents that Yahoo had acquired the previous year as part of its takeover of pay-per-position specialist Overture.

Google ultimately settled the case by issuing 2.7 million shares to its rival.

The latest suit was filed in the US district court for the northern district of California.

Yahoo threatens Facebook as patent war looms

Yahoo has demanded licensing fees from Facebook for use of its technology, the companies said on Monday, potentially engulfing social media in the patent battles and lawsuits raging across much of the tech sector.

Yahoo has asserted claims on patents that include the technical mechanisms in the Facebook’s ads, privacy controls, news feed and messaging service, according to a source briefed on the matter.

Representatives from the two companies met on Monday and the talks involved 10 to 20 of Yahoo’s patents, said the source, who was not aware of what specific dollar demands Yahoo may have made for licenses.

Yahoo did not elaborate in an emailed statement on details of its discussions with Facebook, but indicated it would not flinch at taking the social networking giant to court over its patents.

Yahoo said other companies have already licensed some of the technologies at issue, and that it would act unilaterally if Facebook refused to pay for a patent license.

“Yahoo has a responsibility to its shareholders, employees and other stakeholders to protect its intellectual property,” the company said.
The meeting between the two companies was first reported by the New York Times.

A Facebook spokesman said: “Yahoo contacted us at the same time they called the New York Times and so we haven’t had the opportunity to fully evaluate their claims.”

Should Yahoo wind up suing Facebook, it would mark the first major legal battle among technology giants in the social media sphere and a major escalation of patent litigation that has already swept up the smartphone and tablet sectors and high-tech stalwarts such as Apple Inc, Microsoft Corp and Motorola Mobility.

Yahoo’s patent claims follow Facebook’s announcement of plans for an initial public offering that could value the company at about $100 billion.

Several social networking companies, including Facebook, have seen an uptick in patent claims asserted against them as they move through the IPO process.

However, most of those lawsuits have been filed by patent aggregators that buy up intellectual property to squeeze value from it via licensing deals, and none by a large tech company such as Yahoo.

Reuters

Facebook offers olive branch to mobile carriers

Facebook said it could team up with mobile operators on payments, in an offer that would give them back part of the revenue and influence they have lost in recent years to Apple and Google.
Speaking for the first time at Mobile World Congress, the industry’s biggest gathering, Facebook said operators could help it make money from its hundreds of millions of mobile users buying games or music on the social network.
Mobile operators have been increasingly sidelined by internet companies, which often appeal directly to consumers, hog network capacity with bandwidth-hungry services like YouTube, and compete with the telcos’ own products.
“Facebook and mobile were made for each other,” chief technology officer Bret Taylor said on Monday, echoing then-Google chief executive Eric Schmidt’s first overtures to the industry at the Barcelona event two years ago.
Facebook said earlier this month in its filing for an initial public offering more than half its 845 million active users accessed its site from a mobile device.
It has yet to figure out how to make money from mobile — the vast majority of its $3.7 billion revenue last year came from ads delivered to desktop users.
That mobile is central to Facebook’s future success is clear, but whether it will prove a valuable partner or a value-destroying competitor to mobile operators is less so.
Facebook has a popular messaging service that allows users to have group chats and exchange photos and video in real time for free, which is drawing users away from SMS text services offered by telcos.
Andrew Collinson, research director at British telecoms consultancy STL Partners, said operators should be wary of betting their future on Facebook.
“Short term, Facebook is a good ally for the telcos. The danger is that, I think, it will eventually have to move into communications to justify its valuation,” he said.
Taylor said operators could play a vital role in billing for Facebook’s services, potentially putting the 30 percent tolls that Apple and Google collect in their app stores in the hands of the operators instead.
The billing alliance includes eight major carriers such as Spanish group Telefonica (TEF.MC), U.S. operator AT&T (T.N) and Japanese company Softbank (9984.T)
Operators could also help Facebook make money from users of more basic phones in emerging economies such as India and Nigeria, many of whom do not have access to app stores or own credit cards to make online purchases.
Taylor said Facebook would lend its weight to a push for better web standards that enable more apps to be delivered via a simple internet browser, instead of going through Apple and Google’s stores.

Reuter