Eight Years After Shooting, Nobel-Winner Malala Graduates From Oxford University

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Malala was shot in the head by a Taliban hitman in October 2012. Photo: [email protected]

 

 

Nobel Prize-winning activist Malala Yousafzai on Friday, graduated from the Oxford University, eight years after she was shot for campaigning for girls’ education in her home country, Pakistan. 

Malala was attacked by the Taliban on her way to school  in the Pakistani Swat Valley area.

The joyous 22-year-old took to her official Twitter handle to post photos of her celebrating the milestone with her family.

“Hard to express my joy and gratitude right now as I completed my Philosophy, Politics and Economics degree at Oxford,” she wrote.

“I don’t know what’s ahead. For now, it will be Netflix, reading and sleep.”

In the photos, she was covered in brightly coloured bits of paper and foam — a student tradition — and having a cake with her family, decorated with the words “Happy Graduation Malala”.

She first came to the limelight at the age of 11 after a blog for the BBC’s Urdu-language service charting her life in Swat under the Taliban.

Malala was shot in the head by a Taliban hitman in October 2012, and after being flown to Britain for life-saving medical treatment, the family settled in Birmingham, central England.

She was at school there when she heard in 2014 that she had won the Nobel Peace Prize along with Indian activist Kailash Satyarthi “for their struggle against the suppression of children and young people and for the right of all children to education.”

The youngest ever Nobel laureate, she has continued to speak out for girls’ education.

Malala Questions Nigerian Government’s Education Strategy

Malala-WikeOfficials of the Malala Foundation have decried Nigeria’s ranking as one of the countries with the worst figure of out-of-school children in the world.

The officials expressed their views during the visit of Pakistan girls’ education activist, Malala Yousafsai, to the Minister of Education in Abuja.

Members of the foundation, officials from the United Nations and the Department for State Services were on a fact-finding mission to the Ministry of Education as part of activities to mark the Malala Day in Abuja.

The team questioned the Federal Government’s strategies on education and sought to know why it was yet to achieve significant success in tackling the challenge of access to education and enrolment of the 10.5 million out-of-school children in the country.

The Minister of State was swift to reel out the various projects by the Federal Government to support the states to enrol the millions of out-of-school children across the country but the team appeared unimpressed.

The Minister of State for Education, Mr Nyesom Wike, then explained that the Federal Government was not to blame for the challenge but the states. He revealed that 139 billion naira had already been given to states to improve support.

He, however, promised that the Government would ensure an additional enrolment of at least 2 million children by 2015.

The Malala Foundation officials advised the Federal Government to co-operate better with the states to alleviate the crisis.

The group’s visit to Nigeria takes place almost three months after the abduction of the Chibok girls on April 14.

The renewed pledge by the Government to up the enrolment figures is one Nigerians hope would reduce the education crisis in the country.