Osinbajo Reveals ‘One More Thing’ To Defeat Boko Haram Completely

Osinbajo Reveals 'One More Thing' To Defeat Boko Haram CompletelyThe Federal Government may have concluded that Boko Haram has been technically defeated, but there is “one thing” they say is left to properly deal a lasting blow to the menace.

To this end, the Nigerian Government and France have agreed to work together in achieving a terror free Nigeria.

Both countries indicated their interests on Friday at a bilateral meeting between Nigeria’s Vice President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo, and French Prime Minister, Mr Bernard Cazeneuve, in Paris.

According to Professor Osinbajo who stressed the need to break the ideological underpinnings of terror, “one thing left for us to deal with is deradicalisation, defeating the ‘ideology’ behind the mindless killing and violence”.

On his part, Mr Cazeneuve praised what he described as the ‘tremendous progress’ made by the President Muhammadu Buhari led administration in degrading Boko Haram and suppressing the insurgency significantly.

He pledged that France will stand by Nigeria, saying the French Government is aware of the problem and they know “it cannot be solved by countries working alone”.

Professor Osinbajo has been in France where he attended and spoke at the just concluded Global Forum on Anti-Corruption and Integrity hosted by the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD).

Looted Funds: Osinbajo Blames Difficult Recovery On Int’l Financial System

We Hear You, Loud And Clear, Osinbajo Tells ProtestersNigeria’s Vice President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo, has blamed the difficulty in retrieving funds looted from the country on the international financial system.

Professor Osinbajo was speaking on Thursday at the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) forum in Paris, France.

In a statement, the Vice President pointed out that illicit financial flows must be regarded as corrupt activity.

He acknowledged that the tracing, freezing and return of stolen assets have proved exceptionally difficult for most African countries.

“Countries hosting global financial centres, and other usually targeted destinations of illicit flows must be held more accountable to enforce mechanisms which ensure transparency of ownership, control, beneficial ownership, trusts and other legal contrivances that may be used to camouflage financial or other assets,” Professor Osinbajo said.

He insisted that member-countries must work collaboratively to ensure transparency in financial transfers, and outlaw secrecy jurisdictions, in addition to more rigorous enforcement of rules promoting transparency in the international banking and financial system.