Five Killed In Ukraine Plane Crash

This handout photograph taken and released by The Ukrainian Emergency Ministry shows rescuers as they work at the plane crash site in a forest outside Lviv on October 4, 2019. At least five people have died when a transport plane crashed on October 4, 2019, while landing in western Ukraine, emergency services said. The Antonov-12 was transporting eight people on board and crash-landed 1.5 kilometres from the runway at Lviv airport. Handout / UKRANIAN EMERGENCY MINISTRY / AFP

 

Five people died when a transport plane crashed Friday while coming in to land in western Ukraine, emergency services said.

The Antonov-12 with eight people on board crash-landed 1.5 kilometres (just over a mile) from the runway at Lviv airport.

The surviving three passengers were hospitalised in a serious condition after being trapped in the wreckage, the emergency service said.

It added the aircraft was operated by Kiev-based company Ukraine Air Alliance and flying in from Vigo in Spain.

Deputy Infrastructure Minister Yuriy Lavrenyuk told Ukraine’s 112 TV channel that it was thought the plane had run out of fuel or a pilot had made a mistake.

The emergency services posted a picture of the plane with one wing ripped off.

 

AFP

18 Killed As Pakistan Army Plane Crashes Into Residential Area

Residents sit among the rubble of their destroyed house as soldiers cordon off the site where a Pakistani Army Aviation Corps aircraft crashed in Rawalpindi on July 30, 2019. Seventeen people were killed when a small military plane crashed into a residential area in the Pakistani city of Rawalpindi early on July 30, officials told AFP, in the latest disaster to hit the country’s troubled aviation sector.
Aamir QURESHI / AFP

 

Eighteen people were killed when a small military plane crashed into a residential area in the Pakistani city of Rawalpindi early Tuesday, officials told AFP.

The plane crashed into a poor village near an upscale neighbourhood in the garrison city that is home to the army’s headquarters, creating a fireball that lit up the night sky and terrified residents.

“We have taken 18 dead bodies to hospital… that included 13 civilians and five crew members,” said local rescue spokesman Farooq Butt, adding that a further 12 people had been injured in the accident near the capital Islamabad.

“All the bodies are badly burned, so DNA tests are required for identification,” he added.

One resident told AFP that the crash happened around 2 am.

“I woke to the sound of a huge explosion. I stepped out of my house and saw huge flames and we rushed to the site,” said Mohammad Sadiq.

“People were screaming. We tried to help them but the flames were too high and the fire too intense,” he said, adding he believed seven members of one family were among the dead.

Another resident Ghulam Khan said he heard the plane as it buzzed over his house, adding the aircraft appeared to be on fire before it crashed.

“The sound was so scary,” he added.

The military’s information wing said the plane was on a routine training mission when the accident occurred, adding that rescue officials had extinguished the fire caused by the crash and moved the injured to a local hospital.

An AFP reporter at the scene said smoke was still rising from the wreckage and destroyed homes, while pieces of the plane were visible on a nearby roof.

Hours after the crash rescue workers could be seen combing through the smouldering site, gathering debris and inspecting the scene while ambulances swarmed the area.

Military officials had also cordoned off the crash site while a crowd of residents stood nearby, some of them sobbing.

Prime Minister Imran Khan offered his condolences to the affected families and wished a “quick recovery for the injured”, according to a tweet by the Pakistani government.

Pakistan has a chequered aviation safety record, with frequent plane and helicopter crashes over the years.

In 2016, a Pakistan International Airlines plane burst into flames after one of its two turboprop engines failed while travelling from remote northern Pakistan to Islamabad, killing more than 40 people.

The deadliest air disaster on Pakistani soil was in 2010, when an Airbus 321 operated by private airline Airblue and flying from Karachi crashed into the hills outside Islamabad while coming in to land, killing all 152 on board.

Five Killed In Honduras Plane Crash

This handout picture shows Honduran firefighters at the site of an accident where a light plane crashed into the sea at the Isla Bonita Area, in Roatan, Honduras on May 18, 2019.  HO / Honduran Firefighters / AFP

 

Four Canadians and an American pilot died Saturday when their small plane plunged into the sea off the Honduran island of Roatan where they were vacationing, firefighters said.

The plane crashed near the town of Dixon Cove, a few minutes after taking off from the island’s airport, rescuers said.

The dead were identified as Bradley Post, Bailey Sony, Tomy Dubler, and pilot Patrick Forseth. The other Canadian pilot, Anthony Dubler, briefly survived the crash but died at the Roatan hospital of his injuries.

The causes of the crash and the registration information for the aircraft were not immediately available.

It occurred as the tourists were headed toward the city of Trujillo, about 77 kilometers (48 miles) from Roatan.

AFP

Two Killed In Dubai Plane Crash

 

The pilot and co-pilot of a small plane were killed in a crash Thursday, causing delays at Dubai airport, the emirate’s government media office said.

“An accident involving a small plane with four passengers occurred resulting in the death of the pilot and his assistant,” it said in a statement.

The small Diamond Aircraft, owned by US tech giant Honeywell, crashed due to a technical malfunction, it said.

READ ALSO: Fire Guts Ship Carrying 1,843 Cars

“All operations at the Dubai airport are running smoothly after a slight delay and diversion of some flights as a precautionary measure to ensure security,” it added.

Dubai’s international airport is one of the world’s busiest aviation hubs.

41 Believed Dead In Russian Plane Disaster

This handout picture taken and realeased on May 5, 2019, by the Investigative Committee of Russia shows a fire of a Russian-made Superjet-100 at Sheremetyevo airport outside Moscow. The Interfax agency reported that the plane, a Russian-made Superjet-100, had just taken off from Sheremetyevo airport on a domestic route when the crew issued a distress signal. At least one person died according to Russian agencies.
HO / RUSSIAN INVESTIGATIVE COMMITTEE / AFP

 

Forty-one people are believed to have died after a Russian passenger plane made an emergency landing at Moscow’s busiest airport and caught fire, investigators said on Sunday.

“There were 78 people including crew members on board the plane,” the Investigative Committee said in a statement.

“According to the updated info which the investigation has as of now, 37 people survived.”

AFP

Embattled Boeing Unveils Fix To Flight System After Deadly Crashes

RENTON, WA – MARCH 27: A Boeing 737 MAX airplane is pictured on the company’s production line on March 27, 2019, in Renton, Washington. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images/AFP

 

Embattled aviation giant Boeing pledged on Wednesday to do all it can to prevent crashes like the two that killed nearly 350 people in recent months, as it unveiled a fix to the flight software of its grounded 737 MAX aircraft.

Boeing gathered hundreds of pilots and reporters to unveil the changes to the MCAS stall prevention system, which has been implicated in the tragedies in Ethiopia and Indonesia, as part of a charm offensive to restore the company’s reputation.

“We are going to do everything to make sure that accidents like this don’t happen again,” Mike Sinnett, Boeing’s vice president of product strategy, told reporters at a factory in Washington.

Meanwhile, the head of the US air safety agency faced harsh questions from senators over its relationship with and oversight of Boeing.

Dan Elwell, the acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration, defended his agency but acknowledged that as systems become more complex, the FAA’s “oversight approach needs to evolve.”

Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao and other top officials were also on the hot seat on Capitol Hill.

Boeing chief Dennis Muilenburg was not called to the Senate hearing, but is expected to testify at a later date.

Ahead of the tough questioning, the company launched a campaign to convince the flying public that it is addressing the issues with the 737 MAX, including a fix to the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System (MCAS) implicated in the deadly crashes.

At the company’s massive factory in Renton, Washington, Boeing unveiled the software changes and offered reassurances.

Sinnett said it will take only about an hour to install the updates and they can begin as soon as regulators authorize the changes, which were developed “after months of testing and hundreds of hours.”

Authorization pending

The MCAS, which makes the aircraft dive in order to regain speed if it detects a stall or loss of airspeed, was developed specifically for the 737 MAX, which has a heavier engine than its predecessor, the 737 NG.

Among the changes, the MCAS will no longer repeatedly make corrections when the pilot tries to regain control, and will be automatically disconnected in the event of disagreements between the two “angle of attack” (AOA) sensors, the company said.

This is a major change because until the Ethiopian Airlines tragedy earlier this month, the MCAS was set to react to information from a single sensor and would repeatedly override pilot corrections.

The initial investigation into the Lion Air crash in Indonesia in October found that one of the AOA sensors failed but continued to transmit erroneous information to the MCAS.

Boeing also will install a warning feature — at no cost — called a “disagree light” to indicate to the pilot when the left and right AOA sensors are out of sync.

The company also is revising pilot training, including for those already certified on the 737, to provide “enhanced understanding of the 737 MAX” flight system and crew procedures.

US pilots complained after the Lion Air crash that they had not been fully briefed on the system.

‘Directly involved’

In Washington, US aviation regulators faced questions about how certification for the MAX was handled.

Lawmakers also want to know why officials did not immediately ground the aircraft after an Ethiopian Airlines 737 MAX 8 crashed shortly after takeoff near Addis Ababa on March 10, killing all 157 people onboard.

The delay has given rise to suspicions of a too-cozy relationship between regulators and the American planemaker, especially since Chinese and European authorities moved quickly to ban the planes as soon as similarities with the Lion Air crash were raised.

The FAA — which delegates some certification procedures to Boeing, including for parts of the MAX — was “directly involved” in the safety review of the MCAS, Elwell said.

“The certification process was detailed and thorough,” but “time yields more data,” he added.

A Boeing official meanwhile said there was no need to revamp a regulatory process that has “continued to lead to safer and safer airplanes.”

At a separate hearing, Chao said she was “concerned about any allegations of coziness with any company,” but noted that allowing Boeing to handle some of its own safety certifications was necessary because the FAA “can’t do it on their own.”

She said she has ordered the Transportation Department’s inspector general, Calvin Scovel, to investigate the MAX certification, and Scovel, in turn, noted various concerns with FAA inspectors and procedures.

In his prepared testimony, he called on the agency to tighten oversight of companies that self-certify.

But a Boeing official countered that wholesale changes were not needed, saying: “In general, the process has worked and continues to work, and we see no reason to overhaul the process.”

AFP

French Investigators Receive Black Boxes From Crashed Boeing 737 MAX

A Boeing 737 MAX 9 airplane (file photo) Credit: AFPs

 

French investigators have received the black boxes from the Boeing 737 MAX that crashed east of Addis Ababa in Ethiopia, killing all 157 people on board, France’s BEA airline safety agency said Thursday.

Ethiopian authorities had requested French help to analyse the content of the flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder to discover what caused the Ethiopian Airlines flight to plunge to the ground just minutes after takeoff on Sunday.

AFP

Boeing 737 Crash: Airplanes ‘Too Complex To Fly’, Says Trump

US President Donald Trump/ AFP

 

As investigators probe the latest deadly crash of Boeing’s bestselling airliner, US President Donald Trump weighed in Tuesday with his own explanation: modern planes are too complicated for pilots.

“Airplanes are becoming far too complex to fly,” he tweeted, adding that instead of pilots, the planes require “computer scientists from MIT.”

“I don’t know about you, but I don’t want Albert Einstein to be my pilot. I want great flying professionals that are allowed to easily and quickly take control of a plane!” Trump added in a second tweet.

READ ALSO: Boeing 737 MAX Planes Banned From British Airspace

“I see it all the time in many products,” the president continued. “Always seeking to go one unnecessary step further, when often old and simpler is far better.”

Trump’s technical analysis came two days after a new Boeing 737 MAX 8 belonging to Ethiopian Airlines went down minutes into a flight to Nairobi, killing all 157 aboard.

In October, a Lion Air jet of the same model crashed in Indonesia, killing 189.

AFP

Carleton University Confirms Death Of Pius Adesanmi In Ethiopian Airlines Crash

Adesanmi Photo: Facebook/Pius Adesanmi

 

Nigerian scholar, author and popular columnist/activist, Pius Adesanmi, was among those killed when an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed on Sunday.

All 149 passengers and eight crew members aboard the plane which crashed minutes after departing the Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, for Nairobi in Kenya perished in the tragic incident.

Adesanmi was one of two Nigerians on the tragic flight which went down with nationals from at least 35 other countries. The other Nigerian on the flight was Abiodun Bashua, a retired ambassador on contract with the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA).

In a statement on Sunday evening, Carleton University said the tragic news left its community “shocked and devastated”.

Benoit-Antoine Bacon, who is President and Vice-Chancellor of the University said, “Pius was a towering figure in African and post-colonial scholarship and his sudden loss is a tragedy.”

He added, “Our thoughts and prayers are with his family and all those who knew and loved him, and with everyone who suffered loss in the tragic crash in Ethiopia.”

Also quoted in the statement was the dean of Faculty of Arts and Social Science, Pauline Rankin, who described Adesanmi’s contributions to the university as “immeasurable”.

“He worked tirelessly to build the Institute of African Studies, to share his boundless passion for African literature and to connect with and support students,” she said.

“He was a scholar and teacher of the highest caliber, who leaves a deep imprint on Carleton.”

Tributes have poured in for Adesanmi who is popular for his courageous, constructive and widely regarded columns as well as his passion for the development of Nigeria.

His last post on Facebook went up in the morning of Saturday, March 9, 2019. It was a verse from the Bible:

“If I take the wings of the morning and dwell in the uttermost parts of the sea, even there your hand shall lead me, and your right hand shall hold me – Psalm 139:9-10”.

Pilot Of Crashed Plane Reported ‘Difficulties’, Asked To Return – Ethiopian Airlines

A man carries a piece of debris on his head at the crash site of a Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines flight near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, on March 10, 2019. A Nairobi-bound Ethiopian Airlines Boeing crashed minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa on March 10, killing all eight crew and 149 passengers on board, including tourists, business travellers, and “at least a dozen” UN staff. Michael TEWELDE / AFP

 

The pilot of a Nairobi-bound Boeing 737 that crashed six minutes after takeoff from Addis Ababa on Sunday, had alerted controllers “he had difficulties” and wanted to turn back the plane carrying 157 people, the head of Ethiopian Airlines said.

The pilot “was given clearance” to return to Addis, Chief Executive Officer Tewolde GebreMariam told journalists in the Ethiopian capital when asked whether there had been a distress call.

Read Also: No Survivors On Crashed Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737

The crash which has claimed the lives of the over 157 persons on board from over 33 countries, came on the eve of a major, annual assembly of the UN Environment Programme opening in Nairobi.

The plane had taken off at 8:38 am (0538 GMT) from Bole International Airport and “lost contact” six minutes later near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres (37 miles) southeast of Addis Ababa by road.

It came down near the village of Tulu Fara outside Bishoftu.

Below is a list of the number victims and their countries. The count, however, is not final.

Africa 

Kenya     32

Ethiopia   9

Egypt      6

Morocco    2

Djibouti   1

Mozambique 1

Rwanda     1

Sudan      1

Somalia    1

Togo       1

Uganda     1

Nigeria    1

 Americas 

Canada        18

United States  8

 Asia 

China     8

India     4

Indonesia 1

Nepal     1

 Europe 

Italy    8

France   7

Britain  7

Germany  5

Slovakia 4

Russia   3

Austria  3

Sweden   3

Spain    2

Poland   2

Belgium  1

Ireland  1

Norway   1

Serbia   1

 Middle East 

Israel       2

Saudi Arabia 1

Yemen        1

 Other 

UN passport  1

 TOTAL 

150

Canada Mourns As 18 Citizens Perish In Ethiopian Plane Crash

Canadian Foreign Minister, Chrystia Freeland.                                                           Credit: AFP

 

Canada’s foreign minister on Sunday deplored the “terrible news” that 18 Canadian nationals were among the 157 people killed in the crash of an Ethiopian Airlines jetliner.

“Terrible news from Addis Ababa this morning,” Foreign Minister Chrystia Freeland said on Twitter. “My heartfelt condolences to all those who have lost loved ones.”

She said the Ottawa government was in “close contact” with Ethiopian authorities to gather more information.

READ ALSO: Nigerian Ambassador, Abiodun Bashua Aboard Ill-Fated Ethiopian Plane

The Nairobi-bound Boeing 737 crashed minutes after an early-morning takeoff Sunday from Addis Ababa.

People holding passports from more than 30 countries and the UN were on board, but Canadians, with 18 victims, trailed only the 32 Kenyans who died in the crash.

The plane plowed into a field southeast of Addis Ababa, the airline’s CEO Tewolde GebreMariam told journalists in the Ethiopian capital, lamenting the “very sad and tragic day.”

The crash came on the eve of a major assembly in Nairobi of the UN Environment Program, but that agency did not say whether any delegates were on the plane.

State-owned Ethiopian Airline, Africa’s largest carrier, had taken delivery of the Boeing 737-800 MAX plane only on November 15.

The aircraft was of the same type as a plane that crashed in October shortly after takeoff from Jakarta, killing all 189 people on board.

AFP

Nigerian Ambassador, Abiodun Bashua Aboard Ill-Fated Ethiopian Plane

Kenya Airport Authority (KAA) Managing Director and CEO Jonny Andersen (R) and Kenya’s Transport Minister James Macharia give a press conference on Ethiopia airline’s crash in Ethiopia, at the Jomo Kenyatta International Airport in Nairobi, Kenya, on March 10, 2019. Yasuyoshi CHIBA / AFP

 

The Ethiopian Airlines management has confirmed that a retired Nigerian Ambassador, Abiodun Bashua, was among other nationalities aboard the ill-fated Ethiopian air which crashed shortly after taking off from the airport in Addis Ababa on Sunday, March 9, 2019.

He was a retired Ambassador and on contract with United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA).

Kenya’s Transport Secretary, James Macharia, said passengers from at least 35 nations were aboard the Ethiopian airlines’ flight 302.

READ ALSO: Nationals On Board Crashed Ethiopian Plane

The Ethiopian airlines Boeing 737 passenger jet was en route to Nairobi, Kenya when it crashed, killing all passengers and eight crew on board. The plane is the latest version of the Max 8 B737, described as the world’s bestselling modern passenger aircraft and one of the industry’s most reliable.

Meanwhile, U.S. aerospace giant, Boeing, said on Sunday it was “deeply saddened” about the deaths of all 157 people aboard Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 and would provide technical assistance to find out why its aircraft crashed.

The brand new Boeing 737 — which was delivered just last year — was heading from Addis Ababa to Nairobi when it crashed.

“Boeing is deeply saddened to learn of the passing of the passengers and crew on Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, a 737 MAX 8 airplane,” the company said in a statement.

“We extend our heartfelt sympathies to the families and loved ones of the passengers and crew on board and stand ready to support the Ethiopian Airlines team,” it said.

The single-aisle Boeing 737 MAX is one of the world’s newest and most advanced commercial passenger jets. But the company has come under fire for possible glitches with the plane, which entered service in 2017.

AFP