UK Police Officer Shot Dead In Police Station

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Niklas HALLE’N / AFP

 

A British police officer was shot dead in the early hours of Friday morning, Scotland Yard said, the first officer to be killed by gunfire while on duty in over eight years.

Metropolitan Police launched a murder investigation following the shooting by a 23-year-old man being detained at Croydon Custody Centre in south London at around 2:15 am (0115 GMT).

The suspect was also taken to hospital with a gunshot wound and remains in a critical condition, the force said, but added that no police firearms were discharged during the incident.

Police did not say how the suspect was shot, though the Evening Standard newspaper said he shot himself.

British police are not routinely armed, although forces have tactical firearms units to respond quickly to incidents. Deaths in service are also rare.

“This is a truly shocking incident in which one of our colleagues has lost his life in the most tragic circumstances,” said Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick.

“My heart goes out to his family, direct colleagues and friends.

“When a colleague dies in the line of duty the shockwaves and sadness reverberate throughout the Met and our communities. We will all deeply mourn our colleague.”

Fiona Bone and Nicola Hughes were the last British police officers to be shot dead in the line of duty, when they were ambushed in a gun and grenade attack in September 2012.

They were killed by drug dealer Dale Cregan while responding to a report of a burglary in Manchester, northwest England.

Since then, a further five officers have been killed on duty — four by vehicles while pursuing suspects and one, Keith Palmer, who was stabbed during the 2017 terror attack on parliament.

AFP

Metropolitan Police Chief Grilled Over Nigerian Corruption Charges  

Metropolitan Police The UK Metropolitan Police Chief, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe is to be grilled by MPs over claims that Scotland Yard and the CPS were involved in a ‘deliberate cover-up’ of evidence of police corruption.

According to the Daily Mail UK newspaper, embattled Metropolitan Police Chief, Sir Bernard Hogan-Howe will be grilled by MPs next week over bombshell claims that Scotland Yard and the Crown Prosecution Service were involved in a ‘deliberate cover-up’ of damning evidence of police corruption.

The extraordinary case centres on Scotland Yard’s prosecution of a former Governor of Delta State, James Ibori, who once worked as a cashier at a branch of Wickes DIY store in West London before returning to Nigeria to enter politics.

A court was told that the Met and the CPS repeatedly concealed documents suggesting that officers investigating Mr Ibori for fraud were paid to leak details of the inquiry that could have helped him evade justice.

One detective was said to have received at least 19 unexplained cash deposits totalling thousands of pounds into his bank account, after illegally disclosing sensitive information, a judge heard.

Two UK investigators arrested for collecting bribe from Ibori

Two private investigators were on Tuesday arrested for alleged £20,000 bribery in connection with the investigations into money laundering charges against former Delta State governor, James Ibori.

The officers, who were alleged to have been hired by Mr Ibori to find out what information the UK Metropolitan police had on him, were working for a company known as RISC Management run by a former Scotland Yard Detective Keith Hunter.

According to SKY News cable television report on Wednesday, RISC was hired by the law firm representing Mr Ibori.

It also quoted Mike Schwarz, a partner at Bindmans, a British Law Firm, as informing the Home Affairs Select Committee of the British parliament of possible cash payments made by RISC to sources who were “presumably police officers or those close to the investigation.”

Mr Schwarz stated that invoices at the firm’s disposal showed roughly half a dozen payments amounting to about £20,000 “over an eight- or nine-month period.”

The private detectives aged 53 and 58 were both arrested on suspicion of bribery as part of a “pre-planned operation that forms part of a long and complex investigation by the Directorate of Professional Standards (DPS)”, the report quoted Metropolitan Police as saying.

A statement from the force also said: “The Metropolitan Police Service is investigating an allegation that illegal payments were made to police officers for information by a private investigation agency.”

The former Delta state governor pleaded guilty at Southwark Crown court in February to a series of charges linked to the theft of money from the state treasury and fraud involving state-owned shares in a mobile phone firm.