Germany Demands More Permanent Members For UN Security Council

The German Foreign Affairs Minister, Guido Westerwelle has made a strong case for the inclusion of African nations and Latin American countries with more Asian countries in the United Nations Security Council.

According to the Minister, the inclusion of more member nations in the Security Council will enhance the capacity and authority of the international organization in addressing and avoiding conflicts of today’s world.

Westerwelle made this known during his remarks to questions from journalists after his keynote address at the 2013 Deutsche Welle Global Media Forum in the United Nations city of Bonn, Germany.

Mr Westerwelle noted that all the United Nations institutions as they are, still reflect how the world was after the Second World War and these institutions need urgent reforms to reflect the dimension of today’s globalized world with emerging nations.

“The United Nations reflect in their structures, the world, how it was after World War Two but it is not the current reflection and the fact that all Latin America is not represented permanently in the Security Council of the United Nations with one voice, doesn’t have anything to do with the world of today.”

“These are old structures” he stated to a rousing applause from the audience.

“Ladies and gentlemen, the fact that the whole of the African continent not doesn’t have a single voice, doesn’t have a permanent seat in the Security Council of the United Nations is the world of the past and not of today and not even anything of the future” he told over 2,000 journalists at the World Conference centre in Bonn.

He further decried that “the whole of Asian continent has only one voice, the voice of China in the UN Security Council.

This, he noted “doesn’t reflect the power of relation in the world we are living in and it reflects the situation when the United Nations were established and not really future development.”

The Minister called for the reform of all international organisations to be more representative, warning that not doing so will only ‘weaken’ the institutions.

“The international institutions of the world have to be more representative. If they are not representative, we will weaken them.”

“So all the continents, all success stories has to reflect in all international organization, only then will this international organization have sufficient authority in the world to avoid and overcome conflict.”

The United Nations Security Council is one of the six principal organs of the United Nations and is charged with the maintenance of international peace and security. Its powers, outlined in the United Nations Charter, include the establishment of peacekeeping operations, the establishment of international sanctions, and the authorization of military action.

There are 15 members of the Security Council. This includes five veto-wielding permanent members—China, France, Russia, the United Kingdom, and the United States—based on the great powers that were the victors of World War II.

There are also 10 non-permanent members, with five elected each year to serve two-year terms. This basic structure is set out in Chapter V of the UN Charter.

Nigeria is currently in the forefront of demanding reforms of the UN Security Council as it seeks to take the African slot for a permanent seat with contemporaries such as South Africa and Egypt.

Classical Relationship

Mr Westerwelle also revealed that the German government under Angela Merkel has agreed to further intensify its relationship with African nations, describing the partnership as a ‘classical relationship’ which must “be intensified.”

He described as it as “linking up with the new powers of the world in a strategic way.”

By Ayo Okulaja

ECOWAS set to deploy troops to Mali and Guinea Bissau

The Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) says it will meet the 45-day deadline set by the UN Security Council for the final adoption of the modalities on the deployment of troops to Mali in line with resolutions 2056 and 2071 of the Security Council of the United Nations.

This formed the discussion at an extra ordinary meeting of foreign and defence ministers of member countries.

ECOWAS Commission President, Mr. Kadre Desire Ouedraogo said there is need for a twin approach to the Mali crisis, combining dialogue with military pressure to help Mali dismantle terrorist networks and regain her territorial integrity.

The meeting became crucial as the sub-region finalises plan on the adoption of the United Nation Security Council resolution on Mali and Guinea Bissau.

The resolution will allow for international military intervention in Mali following the capture of the northern part of the country by different armed groups.

Ouedrago observed the urgent need to halt the mafia and criminal practices of terrorist groups and the atrocities committed with impunity by the extremists.

The meeting, he says, will address the concepts of operations for clearly defining the stages of the operating procedures and methods for the planned deployment.

Lending her voice to that of the president of the commission, the ECOWAS Commissioner for Political Affairs, Missus Salamatu Suleiman explains issues that will be considered at the meeting.

Nigeria’s Minister of State for Foreign Affairs, Dr. Nurudeen Mohammed warned that tackling the crisis in Mali and other parts of the West African sub-region is no longer an option but a necessity.

The recommendation of the council will be presented to the extraordinary summit of the ECOWAS Heads of State and Government on Sunday to give additional guidelines regarding the resolution of the crisis for onward transmission to the African Union which will also transmit to the United Nation.