Trump Says ‘Small’ Number Of US Troops Remain In Syria

 

President Donald Trump said Monday a small number of US troops remain in Syria, some near the border with Jordan and others deployed to secure oil fields.

Trump’s comments followed a US pullout from northeastern Syria, leaving the Kurds, America’s staunchest allies in the fight against Islamic State, to face invading Turkish forces.

Speaking at a cabinet meeting, Trump said the “small number” of US troops staying behind were in an entirely different part of Syria, near its border with Jordan and Israel.

He said another group still in Syria “secured the oil,” a reference to oil fields that the US hopes to keep from falling into the hands of jihadist fighters.

“I always said if you’re going in, keep the oil,” Trump said, suggesting that the US would “maybe get one of our big oil companies in to do it properly.”

Trump said that otherwise US troops are “moving out nicely.”

US Defense Secretary Mark Esper said earlier in Kabul, however, that the US withdrawal would take “weeks not days.”

“We have troops in towns in northeast Syria that are located next to the oil fields. The troops in those towns are not in the present phase of withdrawal,” Esper said.

Oil Attack: Iran Issues ‘Battlefield’ Warning As US Deploys Troops

Iranian Revolutionary Guards commander Major General Hossein Salami at Tehran’s Islamic Revolution and Holy Defence museum during the unveiling of an exhibition of what Iran says are US and other drones captured in its territory, in the capital Tehran on September 21, 2019. ATTA KENARE / AFP

 

Any country that attacks Iran will become the “main battlefield”, the Revolutionary Guards warned Saturday after Washington ordered reinforcements to the Gulf following attacks on Saudi oil installations it blames on Tehran.

Tensions escalated between arch-foes Iran and the United States after last weekend’s attacks on Saudi energy giant Aramco’s Abqaiq processing plant and Khurais oilfield halved the kingdom’s oil output.

Yemen’s Huthi rebels have claimed responsibility for the strikes but the US says it has concluded the attacks involved cruise missiles from Iran and amounted to “an act of war”.

Washington approved the deployment of troops to Saudi Arabia at “the kingdom’s request,” Defence Secretary Mark Esper said, noting the forces would be “defensive in nature” and focused on air and missile defence.

But Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps commander Major General Hossein Salami said Iran was “ready for any type of scenario”.

“Whoever wants their land to become the main battlefield, go ahead,” he told a news conference in Tehran.

“We will never allow any war to encroach upon Iran’s territory.

“We hope that they don’t make a strategic mistake”, he said, listing past US military “adventures” against Iran.

Salami was speaking at Tehran’s Islamic Revolution and Holy Defence museum during the unveiling of an exhibition of what Iran says are US and other drones captured in its territory.

It featured a badly damaged drone with US military markings said to be an RQ-4 Global Hawk that Iran downed in June, as well as an RQ-170 Sentinel captured in 2011 and still intact.

 ‘Act of war’ 

The Guards also displayed the domestically manufactured Khordad 3 air defence battery they say was used to shoot down the Global Hawk.

“What are your drones doing in our airspace? We will shoot them down, shoot anything that encroaches on our airspace,” said Salami, noting Iran had defeated “America’s technological dominance” in air defence and drone manufacture.

His remarks came only days after strikes on Saudi oil facilities claimed by Yemen’s Huthis, but the US says it has concluded the attack involved cruise missiles from Iran and amounted to “an act of war”.

Saudi Arabia, which has been bogged down in a five-year war across its southern border in Yemen, has said Iran “unquestionably sponsored” the attacks.

The kingdom says the weapons used in the attacks were Iranian-made, but it stopped short of directly blaming its regional rival.

“Sometimes they talk of military options,” Salami said, apparently referring to the Americans.

Yet he warned that “a limited aggression will not remain limited” as Iran was determined to respond and would “not rest until the aggressor’s collapse.”

 ‘Crushing response’ 

The Guards’ aerospace commander said the US ought to learn from its past failures and abandon its hostile rhetoric.

“We’ve stood tall for the past 40 years and if the enemy makes a mistake, it will certainly receive a crushing response,” Brigadier General Amirali Hajizadeh said.

The United States upped the ante on Friday by announcing new sanctions against Iran’s central bank, with President Donald Trump calling the measures the toughest America has ever imposed on another country.

Washington has imposed a series of sanctions against Tehran since unilaterally pulling out of a landmark 2015 nuclear deal in May last year.

It already maintains sweeping sanctions on Iran’s central bank, but the US Treasury said Friday’s designation was over the regulator’s work in funding “terrorism”.

The “action targets a crucial funding mechanism that the Iranian regime uses to support its terrorist network, including the Qods Force, Hezbollah and other militants that spread terror and destabilise the region,” said US Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin.

The Qods Force is the Guards’ foreign operations arm, while Hezbollah is a Lebanese Shiite militant group closely allied with Iran.

Iran’s Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said the new sanctions meant the United States was “trying to block the Iranian people’s access to food and medicine”.

It showed the US was in “despair” and that “the maximum pressure policy has reached its end,” semi-official news agency ISNA quoted him as saying from New York.

AFP

Trump: US To Keep 8,600 Troops In Afghanistan After Deal With Taliban

US President Donald Trump speaks to the press as he departs the White House in Washington, DC on June 26, 2019. Trump is traveling to Osaka, Japan, for the G20 Summit. Anna-Rose GASSOT / AFP

 

President Donald Trump on Thursday said that US troop levels in Afghanistan will drop to 8,600 if a deal is reached with the Taliban and that a permanent presence will remain.

“We’re going down to 8,600 and then we make a determination from there,” Trump said in an interview with Fox News radio. “We’re always going to have a presence.”

Trump also said that if another attack on the United States originated from Afghanistan “we would come back with a force like… never before.”

READ ALSO: Court Bids Launched To Stop Johnson Suspending UK Parliament

US troops were first sent to Afghanistan after the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on US soil carried out by Al-Qaeda, which was sheltered by the former Taliban regime.

Washington now wants to end its military involvement and has been talking to the Taliban since at least 2018. Trump says that troops will only be reduced when the Taliban gives a guarantee that its territory will not be used by Al-Qaeda or other international militant groups.

Trump underlined that there was to be no complete withdrawal, keeping a force that would provide “high intelligence.”

“You have to keep a presence,” he said.

AFP

South Korea Announces Hike In Payment For US Troops

South Korean Foreign Minister Kang Kyung-Wha (R) and Timothy Betts, acting Deputy Assistant Secretary and Senior Advisor for Security Negotiations and Agreements in the US Department of State, shake hands before their meeting at Foreign Ministry in Seoul on February 10, 2019.
Lee Jin-man / POOL / AFP

 

Seoul announced on Sunday that it has agreed to hike its payment for maintaining American troops on its soil, settling a dispute with its longtime ally ahead of a second summit between the United States and North Korea.

The two countries have been in a security alliance since the 1950-53 Korean war, which ended with an armistice rather than a peace treaty — with more than 28,000 US troops stationed in the South to guard against threats from Pyongyang.

But US President Donald Trump has repeatedly complained about the expense of keeping American forces on the peninsula, with Washington reportedly asking Seoul to double its contribution toward costs.

The negotiations ended with South Korea’s foreign ministry saying Seoul will pay about 1.04 trillion won (US$924 million) in 2019, 8.2 per cent more than what is offered under a previous five-year pact which expired at the end of last year.

The ministry said that although the US had demanded a “huge increase” in payment, they were able to reach an agreement that reflects “the security situation of the Korean peninsula”.

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“The two countries reaffirmed… the importance of a strong South Korea-US alliance and the need for a stable stationing of the US troops,” it said in a statement issued after a signing ceremony.

The row had raised concern that Trump may use it as an excuse for US withdrawal.

The US president and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un are expected to discuss an official declaration to end the decades-old war — a prelude to a peace treaty — at their second summit in Hanoi later this month.

At their first meeting in Singapore last year, the notoriously unpredictable US president had made a shock decision to suspend US-South Korea military drills.

But Trump told US broadcaster CBS last week that he had “no plans” to remove US troops from South Korea as part of a deal at the upcoming summit, although he admitted “maybe someday” he would withdraw them, adding: “It’s very expensive to keep troops there.”

Since the deal is only valid for one year, the two sides may soon have to return to the negotiating table.

Seoul contributed around 960 billion won last year — more than 40 per cent of the total bill — financing the construction of American military facilities and paying South Korean civilians working on US bases.

The deal will officially go into effect after it receives parliamentary approval in South Korea, which is expected to take place in April, according to Yonhap news agency.

AFP

US Soldiers, Others Killed In Syria As ISIS Claims Responsibility

An image grab taken from a video obtained by AFPTV on January 16, 2019, shows US troops gathered at the scene of a suicide attack in the northern Syrian town of Manbij. AFP / ANHA

 

A suicide attack claimed by the Islamic State group killed 15 people including US serviceman Wednesday in the northern Syrian city of Manbij near the Turkish border, a monitor said.

Nine civilians and five US-backed fighters were among the dead in the attack on a restaurant in the flashpoint city, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

Rubble littered the outside of the eatery in the city center, footage from a Kurdish news agency showed, and its facade was blackened by the blast.

The Britain-based Observatory, which relies on a network of sources in Syria, said it was the first such suicide attack in the city against the US-led coalition fighting IS in 10 months.

The bombing came as Kurds who control a large swathe of northern Syria rejected a Turkish plan to set up a “security zone” on the Syrian side of the border.

Almost eight years into Syria’s civil war, Turkey has repeatedly threatened to attack Syrian Kurdish fighters it views as “terrorists” on its southern flank.

Washington, which has relied heavily on the Kurds in its campaign against IS in Syria, has sought guarantees for their safety after President Donald Trump suddenly announced a US troop pullout last month.

On Tuesday, Turkey’s President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Ankara would set up a “security zone” in northern Syria following a suggestion by Trump.

The planned buffer would embrace a large swathe of the autonomous region the Kurds have established in northern and northeastern Syria.

Senior Kurdish political leader Aldar Khalil said any Turkish deployment in Kurdish-held areas was “unacceptable”.

 ‘Safe zone’ 

He said the Kurds would accept the deployment of UN forces along a separation line between Kurdish fighters and Turkish troops to ward off the threatened offensive.

But “other choices are unacceptable as they infringe on the sovereignty of Syria and the sovereignty of our autonomous region,” Khalil told AFP.

Ankara has welcomed Washington’s planned withdrawal of some 2,000 US troops from Syria but the future of US-backed Kurdish fighters has poisoned relations between the NATO allies.

On Monday, Erdogan had a telephone conversation with Trump to ease tensions after the US leader threatened to “devastate” the Turkish economy if Ankara attacks Kurdish forces in Syria, and called for a “safe zone”.

The Kurdish People’s Protection Units (YPG) have been the key US ally in the fight against IS.

They have taken heavy losses in a campaign now nearing its conclusion, with the jihadists confined to an ever-shrinking enclave of just 15 square kilometers (under six square miles).

The shock announcement of a US withdrawal has sent the Kurds scrambling to seek a new ally in Damascus, which has long rejected Kurdish self-rule.

With military backing from Russia since 2015, President Bashar al Assad’s government has made huge gains against the jihadists and rebels, and now controls almost two-thirds of the country.

A northwestern enclave held by jihadists and pockets held by Turkish troops and their allies remains beyond its reach, along with the much larger Kurdish region.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said the Syrian government must take control of the north.

“The best and only solution is the transfer of these territories under the control of the Syrian government, and of Syrian security forces and administrative structures,” Lavrov said.

 ‘US clarification’ 

The head of Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, another key ally of the Damascus regime, said it would not withdraw any forces from Syria, dismissing Israel threats.

Erdogan said he had a “quite positive” telephone conversation with Trump late on Monday in which he reaffirmed that “a 20-mile (30 kilometers) security zone along the Syrian border… will be set up by us.”

The Syrian Kurdish leader said Turkey was the wrong choice to oversee the mooted “security zone”.

“Trump wants to implement these safe regions through cooperation with Turkey. But any role for Turkey will upset the balance and the region will not be safe,” Khalil said.

The Turkish army has launched two major operations in Syria — in 2016 against IS jihadists and Syrian Kurdish fighters, and in 2018 targeting the Kurds.

The last offensive saw Turkish troops and their Syrian rebel allies overrun the Kurdish enclave of Afrin in the northwest, one of several the Kurds had governed since 2012.

Critics have accused Turkish troops and their proxies of military occupation of Syrian sovereign territory.

Ankara has spoken of a YPG-free “security zone” under its control, but it is not clear if Washington has the same details in mind.

Analyst Mutlu Civiroglu said it was not immediately clear what the US president meant by a “safe zone”, or who he thought would patrol it.

Analysts were “waiting for a clarification from Washington to see what the president really meant”, he told AFP.

AFP

Trump’s Foreign Policy In Spotlight After Withdrawal Of US Troops

FILE PHOTO of US Troops.

 

US politicians and international allies scrambled Friday to make sense of President Donald Trump’s momentous foreign policy decisions for Syria and Afghanistan — epic reversals that prompted Defense Secretary Jim Mattis to quit.

Trump’s historic moves to pull out of Syria and slash troop numbers in Afghanistan run counter to years of US doctrine in the region, and set the stage for a cascading series of events that could well result in more bloodshed across a scarred region.

While many Americans — and not just his supporters — lauded Trump’s decision, fed up after years of costly and spiraling conflicts, politicians of every stripe were tripping over each other to voice their condemnation.

“Reducing the American presence in Afghanistan and removing our presence in Syria will reverse… progress, encourage our adversaries, and make America less safe,” said Republican Congressman Mac Thornberry, a Trump ally who heads the House Armed Services Committee.

In the Pentagon, no one seemed to know what comes next.

“We are referring all questions to the White House,” one spokeswoman said when asked about the momentous Afghanistan withdrawal.

Mattis, who was seen as a voice of moderation and widely trusted by allies, resigned Thursday after telling Trump he could not abide the Syria decision.

It leaves vulnerable to Turkish attack thousands of Kurdish fighters the Pentagon has spent years training and arming to fight the Islamic State group.

 ‘No surprise’ 

In Afghanistan, the Taliban welcomed Trump’s partial pull out, with a spokesman saying the group was “more than happy.”

Bill Roggio, an Afghanistan expert and senior fellow at the Foundation for Defense of Democracies, told AFP the Trump administration’s Middle East policy is in disarray.

“I do not know what its policy is, specifically with respect to what was known as the War on Terror,” he said.

“Until Trump articulates a policy, it appears isolationism has won the day.”

Trump campaigned on a pledge of “America First” and vowed to limit US engagement overseas, so his action on Afghanistan and Syria aren’t bolts from the blue, and many observers were pleased with his actions.

Just weeks before Mattis announced a surge of troops in Afghanistan in August 2017, polls showed Americans were weary of war and lacked confidence that Washington had any winning strategy.

A Morning Consult-Politico poll at the time showed only 23 percent of people thought the US was “winning” in Afghanistan; 38 percent thought it was “losing.”

“Trump ran on a platform of non-intervention, ‘no more stupid wars,’ and promised to get out of the nation-building business,” Daniel Davis, a retired army lieutenant colonel and senior fellow at the Defense Priorities military think tank, told AFP.

“That, in general terms, is his policy, which is fundamentally sound.”

In March, Trump said he wanted to bring troops home “soon” from Syria and last year, when he agreed to boost the US troop presence in Afghanistan, he said he was doing so against his own instincts.

“Getting out of Syria was no surprise,” Trump tweeted on Thursday.

“I’ve been campaigning on it for years, and six months ago, when I very publicly wanted to do it, I agreed to stay longer,” he added, noting that it was “time to come home” and “time for others to finally fight.”

‘Strategic mistake’ 

Trump claims IS has been defeated territorially in Syria, even though thousands of fighters remain and still hold small pockets of land.

His withdrawal from Syria abruptly ends American influence in the war-ravaged country and gives the Turks an opening to attack US-backed Kurds.

Trump reportedly made the decision during a phone call last week with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

By ceding Syria, Trump is also yanking a keystone of his own administration’s foreign policy: to push back against Iran, which supports President Bashar al-Assad and is seeking to expand regional influence.

“This is a huge strategic mistake that I hope the president will reconsider,” Jack Keane, a retired general, told Fox News.

“If he does not, I believe with some degree of confidence that he will come to regret this decision.”

Keane has been one of the names in the Washington rumor mill to replace Mattis.

He went on to warn that Trump was repeating the “mistakes” of President Barack Obama, who for years drew withering criticism from Republicans for pulling US troops out of Iraq, only to see the emergence of IS.

Trump’s withdrawal orders, meanwhile, rattled Europe.

French Defense Minister Florence Parly said there was still “has a job to finish” in Syria and called on the US to discuss its withdrawal with other members of a coalition fighting IS.

Britain’s junior defense minister Tobias Ellwood had contradicted Trump on Wednesday, retweeting his message that the jihadists had been defeated in Syria with the words: “I strongly disagree.

“It has morphed into other forms of extremism and the threat is very much alive,” he wrote.

AFP

US Troops’ Withdrawal Will Not Affect Afghan Security – Presidency

Afghan president Ashraf Ghani speaks during a press conference at Presidential Palace in Kabul on June 30, 2018. NOORULLAH SHIRZADA / AFP 

 

A withdrawal of US troops from Afghanistan would not affect the security of the war-torn country, a spokesman for President Ashraf Ghani said Friday, in the first official response to the news that has left officials in Kabul reeling. 

“If they withdraw from Afghanistan it will not have a security impact because in the last four and half years the Afghans have been in full control,” presidential spokesman Haroon Chakhansuri said via social media.

AFP

Trump Plans Full Withdrawal Of US Troops From Syria

FILE PHOTO of US Troops.

 

The United States will withdraw its troops from Syria, a US official told AFP on Wednesday, after President Donald Trump said America has “defeated ISIS” in the war-ravaged country.

The move will have extraordinary geopolitical ramifications and throws into question the fate of US-backed Kurdish fighters who have been tackling Islamic State jihadists.

“We have defeated ISIS in Syria, my only reason for being there during the Trump Presidency,” Trump tweeted.

The US official said the decision was finalized Tuesday.

“Full withdrawal, all means all,” the official said when asked if the troops would be pulled from all of Syria.

The official would not provide a timeline.

“We will ensure force protection is adequately maintained, but as quickly as possible,” the official said.

Currently, about 2,000 US forces are in Syria, most of them on a train-and-advise mission to support local forces fighting IS.

A large contingent of the main fighting force, an alliance known as the Syrian Democratic forces (SDF), is Kurdish and is viewed by Turkey as a “terrorist” group.

Ankara has said it plans to launch an operation against the  Kurdish militia, known as the YPG (Kurdish People’s Protection Units).

The Pentagon would not confirm the US troop pull-out.

“At this time, we continue to work by, with and through our partners in the region,” Pentagon spokesman Colonel Rob Manning said.

While the YPG has spearheaded Washington’s fight against IS, US support has strained relations between the NATO allies.

Ties have grown more fraught since the US set up observation posts in northern Syria close to the border with Turkey to prevent any altercation between Turkish forces and the YPG.

IS swept across large swaths of Syria and neighboring Iraq in 2014, implementing their brutal interpretation of Islamic law in areas they controlled.

But they have since seen their dream of a state crumble, as they have lost most of that territory to various offensives.

In Syria, IS fighters are holding out in what remains of the pocket that once included Hajin, including the villages of Al-Shaafa and Sousa.

Most US forces are stationed in northern Syria, though a small contingent is based at a garrison in Al-Tanaf, near the Jordanian and Iraqi border.

AFP

Troops To Remain At Border ‘As Long As Necessary’ – Trump

A US Customs and Border Protection officer, stands guard on the US side of the US-Mexico border fence as seen from Playas de Tijuana, Mexico, on November 16, 2018. ALFREDO ESTRELLA / AFP

 

President Donald Trump on Saturday defended his controversial deployment of thousands of troops to the US-Mexico border, confirming they would remain in place “as long as necessary.”

“We have a tremendous military force on the southern border, we have large numbers of people trying to get into our country,” he told reporters at the White House ahead of a visit to California.

“They built great fencing, they built a very powerful fence,” he added.

Some 5,900 active-duty troops are now stationed along the border, a contentious deployment in support of civilian forces that Trump ordered ahead of the recent midterm elections.

Opponents have criticized the cost and usefulness of the operation, dismissing it as a political stunt.

An additional 2,100 or so National Guardsmen have been deployed to support operations at the border, bringing the total military presence to about 8,000.

AFP

Seven US Personnel Killed In Iraq Helicopter Crash 

Two Crew Feared Dead In Japan Army Helicopter Crash
FILE PHOTO: A Self Defense Force helicopter. PHOTO: KAZUHIRO NOGI / AFP

 

Seven US troops were killed when their helicopter crashed during a transport mission in western Iraq, a defence official told AFP Friday.

The Sikorsky HH-60 Pave Hawk chopper was on a routine troop transport operation Thursday flying from Iraq to Syria when it went down, the official said.

“There were seven people aboard — they are all believed to be dead,” the official added.

The four crewmembers were all in the Air Force, but it was not immediately known which service the other troops were from, another official said.

Investigators are probing the crash’s cause. A Pentagon statement said it did not appear to be a result of enemy activity.

An accompanying US helicopter reported the crash and a quick reaction force comprised of Iraqi Security Forces and US-led coalition members secured the scene.

“This tragedy reminds us of the risks our men and women face every day in service of our nations. We are thinking of the loved ones of these service members today,” Brigadier General Jonathan Braga said.

“We are grateful to the Iraqi security forces for their immediate assistance in response to this tragic incident.”

The identities of those killed will be released after next of kin are notified.

First introduced in the early 1980s, the ageing Pave Hawk is based on the Army’s Black Hawk chopper and is used often used for medical evacuation missions.

President Donald Trump took to Twitter to share his condolences.

“Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families and loved ones of the brave troops lost in the helicopter crash on the Iraq-Syria border yesterday. Their sacrifice in service to our country will never be forgotten,” he wrote.

The US has operated helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft in Iraq during the war against the Islamic State group, which overran large areas north and west of Baghdad in 2014.

US forces began carrying out air strikes against IS in August 2014, a campaign that was later expanded to Syria and has provided weapons, training and other support to forces fighting the jihadists in both countries.

Baghdad declared victory over the extremists late last year but IS still has the ability to wage deadly violence in Iraq, including a series of attacks in the country’s north that left 25 dead earlier this month.

AFP

IS Video Of Niger Attack Highlights US Troops’ Vulnerability

FILE PHOTO of US Troops.

 

A propaganda video released by the Islamic State group showing the deadly ambush of US troops in Niger raised fresh questions Monday as to the nature of the mission and why the soldiers had been left so vulnerable. 

The distressing video, distributed by a pro-IS news agency, includes graphic footage taken by a soldier wearing a helmet camera.

It shows the chaos of the attack, including the soldier wearing the camera being shot dead, with apparent IS fighters stalking past his body.

The Defense Department “is aware of alleged photos and IS propaganda video from the October 4, 2017, terrorist attack in Niger. The release of these materials demonstrates the depravity of the enemy we are fighting,” the Pentagon said in a statement.

The nine-minute video, set to Islamic chanting, includes an image of IS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi and footage of pick-up trucks rolling through a desert landscape.

One of the vehicles is flying an IS flag and other trucks are packed with what appear to be fighters.

The October 4 attack occurred as a unit of 12 American special forces soldiers and 30 Nigerien troops returned from the village of Tongo Tongo, near the border with Mali.

They were attacked by a group of some 50 IS-affiliated fighters equipped with small arms, grenades and trucks mounted with guns.

– Ill-equipped –

The mission was supposed to be a low-risk patrol and the soldiers were clearly ill-equipped for the scale of the attack.

Footage shows the US troops wearing only light body armor, desperately seeking cover behind an unarmored SUV while coming under heavy fire.

In a frantic bid to find some sort of concealment, the troops deployed red smoke grenades but the parched landscape of scrub and dirt provided no effective cover.

At one point in the video, a US soldier is shot and a comrade attempts to pull him to cover behind the SUV.

As their position is about overrun, they have no choice but to try to run away, but there is nowhere to hide.

Four American soldiers were killed along with at least five Nigerien troops. The body of one US soldier, Sergeant La David Johnson, was not recovered until the following day.

“Knowing that they were asked to try and complete and execute this type of mission with that type of equipment, I just could not believe it,” Republican Congressman Marc Veasey told CBS news.

Questions remain about what intelligence failures may have occurred that allowed such a large attack, and why the soldiers did not get the immediate backup or air support.

The Americans had been on a joint patrol with Nigerien counterparts they were training when they were ambushed by motorcycle-riding and car-driving gunmen in the Tillaberi region in the Niger’s southwest.

The Pentagon is set to release the findings of an investigation into the incident in the coming days.

AFP

Boko Haram: Nigeria Welcomes U.S. Troops For Cameroon

Boko HaramThe fight against Boko Haram on the West African sub region may have received a boost as the United States has concluded plans to send 300 military personnel to Cameroon to help the regional fight against Boko Haram.

The Nigerian Presidency has welcomed the move by the U.S. Government as reports quote the President’s spokesperson, Garba Shehu saying that the decision is a fulfilment of the pledge of the United States to support the offensive against Boko Haram in Nigeria and in the region.

The Nigerian military too has commended the U.S. for the move and encouraged that the fight can only be won collectively with partners cooperating with the nations, appealing for more global support against terrorism.

It is said that in 2014, America provided intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance expertise to Nigeria in the hunt for more than 200 girls abducted from their school in Chibok in Maiduguri, Borno State in Nigeria’s north east region.

The assistance is believed to have included drones and spy planes as well as up to 80 military personnel.