Youths Protest Over Killing Of Five People In Kaduna

A map showing Kaduna, a state in Nigeria's North-Central region.
A map showing Kaduna, a state in Nigeria’s North-Central region.

 

Youths in Kaduna State on Tuesday took to the streets to protest over the killing of five persons allegedly by police officers in Trikania community of Kaduna South local Government Area.

The five persons were killed in a violence that broke out in the area on Monday after the police and some members of the local vigilante group popularly known as the Civilian JTF attempted to disperse some traders.

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According to them the traders had violated the state’s lockdown order and they resisted the efforts of the security agencies to disperse them, which then resulted in resulted in the tragedy.

While members of the community insist that the deceased died as a result of gunshots from the police, the police insist that they had no hand in the killing.
Four other persons were also injured in the violence but are currently undergoing treatment.

Since March 26, Kaduna State has been on total lockdown as the government imposed a 24-hour curfew in order to contain the spread of the COVID-19 disease in the state.

While there has been total compliance with the order in the city center, it has been serially violated in many satellite towns in the state.

13 Killed, 15 Injured In India Riots

Police personnel march on a road scattered with stones following clashes between supporters and opponents of new citizenship law, in Delhi on February 25, 2020.  Amarjeet Kumar Singh / AFP

 

Thirteen people have been killed and more than 150 injured in sectarian violence that erupted in India’s capital New Delhi for the third day, a hospital official said Tuesday.

“I can now confirm 13 deaths. At least 150 people have come to our hospital with injuries,” Guru Teg Bahadur Hospital official Rajesh Kalra told AFP, adding that a dozen people were in critical condition.

“We are still receiving some people with injuries, most of them firearm injuries today.”

AFP

Police Arrest 17 Suspects For Cultism, Violence In Lagos

Some of the suspects arrested by the police.

 

 

The Lagos State Police Command has arrested 17 suspects for cultism and violence in the Ijora Badia and Ikorodu areas of the state.

A statement on Sunday by the Police Public Relations Officer in the state, Bala Elkana, revealed that the suspects were arrested in batches of five and 12.

Elkana explained that two rival cult groups armed with dangerous weapons engaged themselves in a battle for supremacy at Iso Isu in Ijora Badia and inflicted various degrees of injuries on each other on Friday last week.

He said the police got a distress call and mobilised police operatives from Ijora Badia Division and Special Strike Force on Social Miscreants from the Command Headquarters to the area where five suspects were arrested.

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The suspects are Olaniyi  Abiodun, Emola Kamal, Muritala Gbadeyanka, Kadiri Bashorun, and Adebayo Ebiesuwa, all between ages 18 and 28 years.

“They belong to Aiye and Eiye confraternities,” Elkana said.

Similarly, suspected members of the two cult groups attacked each other on Sunday at Ladega area in Ikorodu where one Lateef Akinpelu was seriously injured.

The police arrested 12 suspects and recovered a locally made pistol while the injured person was taken to General Hospital in Ikorodu for treatment.

Violence, Boycott Overshadow Cameroon Elections

 

Cameroon voted Sunday in polls overshadowed by a partial opposition boycott and separatist violence that has displaced hundreds of thousands of people.

Elections for the central African country’s legislature and local councils are taking place for the first time in seven years, after two postponements.

They are unlikely to ruffle the enduring rule of President Paul Biya, one of the world’s oldest and longest-serving leaders, who has held a tight grip on power for 37 of his 86 years.

As voting began large numbers of police and soldiers were seen deployed on the streets of Buea, the capital of the Southwest Region, one of two provinces gripped by bloody separatist violence.

But the polling stations in the city were almost deserted an hour after they opened at 8am (0700 GMT).

The main opposition party, the Movement for the Rebirth of Cameroon (MRC) is refusing to field a single candidate.

The boycott will all but guarantee a crushing victory for the ruling Cameroon People’s Democratic Movement (RDPC in its French initials), which in the outgoing legislature had 148 out of 180 seats.

The other large opposition party, the Social Democratic Front (SDF), which currently has 18 seats, will take part in Sunday’s vote, going back on a threat to snub it.

In the capital Yaounde, it appeared that enthusiasm for the vote was subdued, with no crowds outside polling stations as they opened in the district of Briqueterie.

“I want to do my duty as a citizen,” said Abdias Lah, one of the few voters to cast an early ballot.

– ‘Spiral of violence’ –

Cameroon is struggling with two conflicts.

In the two English-speaking regions — the southwest and northwest — the armed forces are battling separatists who want to secede from the majority French-speaking country.

The 28-month conflict has claimed more than 3,000 lives and caused more than 700,000 people to flee, according to tolls compiled by NGOs.

Amnesty International said there has been a “surge in violence” by the Cameroon military in the weeks leading up to the vote, resulting in killings and the displacement of thousands in the English-speaking regions.

“In recent weeks, brutal military operations have been conducted while crimes committed by armed separatists continue unabated. Civilians are finding themselves trapped in a spiral of violence,” said Fabien Offner, Amnesty’s Lake Chad Researcher.

The SDF traditionally draws much of its support from the anglophone regions but now fears that it has been outflanked by the radicals — and says its candidates there have come under attack.

Similar worries are being voiced for the safety of polling stations in Cameroon’s Far North region, which has been battered by Boko Haram jihadists crossing from Nigeria.

The government on Friday announced that all of Cameroon’s borders would be closed until Monday, and shops and drink outlets had to close on polling day.

– City power –
MRC leader, Maurice Kamto, spent nine months in jail after his defeat in 2018 presidential elections and is now abroad.

“We could have had a few seats in parliament and some town councillors, but how would that enable us to influence events in Cameroon?” Kamto said in an interview with AFP in Paris last month.

Given the seemingly inevitable outcome of legislative vote, most media attention has focused on the municipal elections that are also taking place.

Some cities, including Douala, the country’s economic hub, could swing to the opposition, according to some forecasts.

City chiefs are to gain powers under measures taken in December to decentralise some authority out of Yaounde.

The reforms have been triggered by the anglophone crisis although they fall far short of meeting the separatists’ demands.

“The stakes (on Sunday) are local,” said Stephane Akoa, a researcher at the Paul Ango Ela think tank in Yaounde.

Police Arrest 86 Suspects For Cultism, Violence In Ikorodu

Police-Policeeeee
A file photo of a police patrol van.

 

 

The Lagos State Police Command says it has arrested 86 suspects for cultism and violent attacks in the Ikorodu area of the state.

The Police Public Relations Officer in the state, Bala Elkana, stated in a statement that the arrests were made in two batches.

“On 25/1/2020 at about 0600hour, acting on credible intelligence, the Special Strike Force on Social Miscreants established by the Commissioner of Police Lagos State, CP Hakeem Odumosu psc arrested 21 cult suspects at Adamo community, Imota.

“The suspects who belong to two rival cult groups, Aiye and Eiye confraternity, mobilised from Emure and Adamo communities to unleash terror on residents of Adamo community and environs,” he said.

Elkana explained that the arrest was carried out in joint operations with operatives from Imota Police Station, Rapid Response Squad, Special Anti-Robbery Squad, and Area N Command.

According to him, this is a follow up to the operations carried out at Ijede where 65 cult suspects were arrested.

The command’s spokesman said 11 assorted pistols of different types with a large quantity of ammunition were recovered from the suspects.

“The suspects confessed to be responsible for series of violent attacks, murder and armed robbery incidents recorded in Ikorodu area of Lagos State,” he added.

Elkana stated that the suspects would be charged to court and the police commissioner has reaffirmed the commitment of the Command to addressing the menace of cultism and youth gangsterism in the state.

Federal Constituency Poll In Imo Declared Inconclusive Over Violence

INEC To Conduct Supplementary Election In Lagos
A file photo of voters casting their ballots during an election in 2019.

 

 

The Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC) has yet to declare a winner in the Orlu/Orsu/Oru East Federal constituency supplementary election in Imo State.

Rather, the returning officer in the election, Professor Greg Obiamalu, declared the poll conducted on Saturday as inconclusive.

Professor Obiamalu made the announcement on Sunday while briefing reporters at the result collation centre.

He said the decision was taken as a result of violence recorded at the collation centre and narrated how the incident happened.

READ ALSO: Senatorial Candidate Shot Dead By NSCDC Official In Imo

According to the returning officer, some gunmen gained access into the collation centre and carted away with all the electoral materials, including all the ballot papers and result sheets.

Meanwhile, the candidate of the Action Alliance (AA) candidate in the Imo North Senatorial District, Ndubuisi Emenike, has been killed.

Emenike was said to have been shot dead by an operative of the Nigeria Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC) on Sunday.

The Police Public Relations Officer in Imo, Orlando Ikeokwu, told reporters that the politician was killed during a celebration party held in honour of the winner of the Okigwe North Federal Constituency supplementary election, Miriam Onuoha.

Onuoha contested the election on the platform of the All Progressives Congress (APC).

10 Killed As Riot Rocks Jail In Venezuela

 

 

Gang fighting at a jail in Venezuela left at least 10 inmates dead, an NGO reported Tuesday.

At least four grenades were detonated in clashes that began Monday evening in the northwestern state of Zulia, said the NGO, a human rights group called Una Ventana a la Libertad.

Venezuelan authorities have not said anything about a toll from the rioting, which the NGO said broke out at a jail which serves as a holding pen at a regional police headquarters.

Prisoners set fire to one wing of the facility, it said.

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It quoted local residents as saying explosions and then gunfire were heard starting late Monday, with the violence continuing overnight.

Zulia governor Omar Prieto said Monday that he is planning to close the detention center.

On December 23, an uprising at the jail left six people dead, the NGO said. One of those was shot by security forces, it added.

It said the jail holds about 1,000 inmates.

Venezuelan prisons suffer from severe overcrowding despite a 2011 plan to upgrade them.

Holding pens like the one in Zulia are full of detainees, who are not supposed to spend more than 48 hours there.

Nationwide, these facilities hold more than five times their capacity. Detainees suffer from violence, malnutrition and diseases such as tuberculosis, La Ventana a la Libertad said.

It said that in just the first half of 2019, 149 prisoners died in police holding pens, due to a variety of causes.

On May 24, a total of 29 inmates died during an attempted breakout from another such jail in the town of Acarigua in the western state of Portuguesa.

Clashes between prisoners and police left 19 officers injured in that incident.

At Least 11 Killed In Central Africa Violence

A man stand in front of a burnt down house in the PK5 district in Bangui on December 26, 2019, after clashes erupted when traders took up arms to oppose taxes levied by militia groups.  AFP

 

At least 11 people were killed in fighting between militiamen and traders in a restive district of Bangui, the capital of the Central African Republic, two security officials and an imam said Thursday.

Between 11 and 14 people died after clashes erupted late Wednesday, the security sources said, while the imam, Awad Al Karim, said “16 bodies” had been brought to the local Ali Babolo mosque.

The fighting began after traders in a mainly Muslim district called PK5 took up arms to oppose taxes levied by militia groups, the imam said.

Bursts of automatic fire and explosions were heard on Wednesday evening and on Thursday morning, according to an AFP journalist who was in a neighbouring district.

Bili Aminou Alao, spokesman for the UN peacekeeping force MINUSCA, said a rapid response force had been sent to the area.

“Part of the market and some vehicles have been burned,” he said.

“Between 40 and 50 shops have been burned down, as well as four or five houses,” said Patrick Bidilou Niabode, head of the CAR’s civil protection service.

Voluntary firefighters put out two fires which had been spreading in the market but were unable to tackle a blaze at two houses because of heavy gunfire, he added.

The CAR is one of the world’s poorest and most volatile countries.

It has been gripped by sporadic violence since 2014, after its then-president, Francois Bozize, was ousted in a coup.

Fierce fighting erupted between predominantly Christian and Muslim militia, prompting the intervention of former colonial power France, under a UN mandate.

Attempts to broker a lasting peace have repeatedly broken down and most the country lies in the hands of armed groups, who often fight over the country’s mineral resources.

PK5 is a powder keg district. It became a haven for many Bangui Muslims at the peak of the Christian-Muslim clashes.

In April 2018, MINUSCA, responding to appeals by local traders, launched an anti-militia operation named Sukula (“Clean-up” in the CAR language of Sango).

The operation ended bloodily with the death of about 30 people and a hundred wounded, sparking a wave of anger among local people.

The CAR’s long conflict has forced nearly a quarter of the country’s 4.7 million people to flee their homes.

The United Nations estimated in September that two thirds of the population depends on humanitarian aid to survive.

The country is ranked next-to-last after Niger on the 2018 UNDP’s Human Development Index, which compares longevity, education, and income per capita. Life expectancy is just 52.9 years.

AFP

Algerians Await Outcome Of Election Marred By Violence, Low Turnout

An Algerian woman chants slogans as she takes part in an anti-government demonstration in the capital Algiers on December 12, 2019 during the presidential election. RYAD KRAMDI / AFP

 

Algerians awaited the outcome Friday of a widely unpopular presidential election marred by attacks on polling stations and the lowest turnout in the country’s history.

The election had been championed by the army as a way of restoring stability almost 10 months into a protest movement that in April ousted president Abdelaziz Bouteflika, 82, after two decades in office.

But on polling day Thursday, protesters defied a heavy police presence to hold a mass rally in the heart of the capital Algiers and smaller demonstrations in provincial cities.

The electoral authority said its chairman Mohamed Charfi would release the results at 11 am (1000 GMT), an announcement that could prompt tens of thousands of election opponents to pour out onto the streets in new protests.

All five of the candidates in Thursday’s vote were widely rejected by protesters as “children of the regime”.

Among them are two of the ousted leader’s former prime ministers — Abdelmajid Tebboune, 74, and Ali Benflis, 75 — and a former minister, Azzedine Mihoubi.

If none of the five hopefuls wins a majority, Algerians will be asked to return to the polls on a date still to be set between December 31 and January 9 for a second-round runoff that could trigger further unrest.

No exit polls were published but a spokesman for Tebboune said his candidate had won an outright majority.

Turnout at record low

On Thursday, a record six in 10 Algerians abstained, Charfi said, the highest rate for a multi-party election since independence from France in 1962.

Tens of thousands rallied in central Algiers, where police with water cannon and helicopters tried to disperse protesters.

“The people want independence,” demonstrators chanted after breaking through a police cordon and filling the streets outside the Central Post Office, their rallying point through more than 40 weeks of protest.

AFP reporters saw a group storming a polling station in the capital, suspending voting there for about half an hour before police pushed them out again.

Late in the afternoon, an AFP reporter saw police using baton charges to disperse remaining protesters.

After dark, witnesses reported ongoing scuffles between police and protesters in the Belouizdad neighbourhood close to the city centre.

In the mountain region of Kabylie, home to much of the country’s Berber minority and historically opposed to the central government, protesters ransacked polling stations and clashed with police, residents said.

In the city of Bejaia, two polling stations were attacked. In Tizi Ouzou, security forces fired teargas to disperse a crowd who had surrounded a government building, triggering a standoff into the night in which several people were wounded.

‘Mired in crisis’

In central Algiers, young protesters slammed those casting their ballots as “traitors of the nation”.

That earned a sharp rebuke from one man in his 80s: “I fought for the right to vote, so I’m voting for my country.”

Other voters said they had turned out because after nearly a year of turmoil it was time for a return to stability.

“I am voting because I am afraid that the country will get mired in the crisis,” said Karim, a 28-year-old civil servant.

Sid Ali, a 48-year-old merchant in Algiers, said: “I support the Hirak (protest) movement but it needs to end. I lost 70 percent of my turnover and many traders are in my situation.”

‘No to the system’

Whoever wins will struggle to be accepted by the electorate in the North African country, where many citizens see the government as inept, corrupt and unable to manage the flagging economy.

The “Hirak” street movement kicked off when Bouteflika announced in February that he would seek a fifth term in office.

Protesters have stayed on the streets ever since, demanding the total dismantling of the system that has ruled Algeria since independence.

The military high command, which long wielded power from the shadows, has been forced to take a more visible role and has pushed for the election as a way to withdraw behind the scenes again.

Demonstrators have vented their anger at army chief Ahmed Gaid Salah, who has emerged as Algeria’s de facto strongman since Bouteflika stepped down.

A previous poll set for July was scrapped for lack of viable candidates and interim president Abdelkader Bensalah’s term technically ended five months ago.

 

AFP

Violence In DR Congo As Rebels Kill 14 Civilians In Revenge Mission

A picture of the DR Congo Flag

 

Assailants in DR Congo have killed 14 civilians in revenge for army offensives against Ugandan rebel strongholds in the east of the country, a local official said on Saturday.

The latest killings, which occurred in the night from Friday to Saturday, take the total number of those killed in revenge attacks to around 30.

 

AFP

Three Dead In Chile Violent Protest

Photo released by Aton of demonstrators lighting bonfires in Vaparaiso, Chile, on October 19, 2019.  Sebastián CISTERNAS / ATON CHILE / AFP

 

Three people died in a fire in a supermarket being ransacked in the Chilean capital early Sunday, as protests sparked by anger over social and economic conditions rocked one of Latin America’s most stable countries.

Santiago’s Mayor Karla Rubilar told reporters two people burned to death in the blaze and another later died in hospital, after the huge store controlled by US retail chain Walmart was looted.

They were the first deaths in two days of violent unrest in which protesters have set buses on fire, burned metro stations and clashed with riot police in the city of seven million — despite a curfew imposed overnight until 07:00 Sunday.

Soldiers were deployed in the streets for the first time since Chile returned to democracy in 1990, following the rightwing Augusto Pinochet dictatorship.

The protests were triggered by an unpopular hike in metro fares, which President Sebastian Pinera announced Saturday he was suspending.

Pinera appealed to people taking to the streets, saying “there are good reasons to do so,” but calling on them “to demonstrate peacefully.”

“Nobody has the right to act with brutal criminal violence,” he said.

But clashes later erupted in Plaza Italia, ground zero of Friday’s violence, and outside the presidential palace.

Protesters again set buses on fire in downtown Santiago, leading to the suspension of services.

“We’re sick and tired, enough already. We’re tired of them screwing around with us. Politicians only do what they want to do, and turn their backs on all reality,” said Javiera Alarcon, a 29-year-old sociologist protesting in front of the presidential palace, which was surrounded by police and military vehicles.

AFP video showed security forces blasting a crowd with water cannon, and riot police wrestling young protesters into vans.

“Having analyzed the situation and the appalling actions that occurred today, I have made the decision to suspend freedoms and movement through a total curfew,” said Army General Javier Iturriaga, who is overseeing security during the state of emergency.

Later on Saturday, the mayors of Valparaiso region and Concepcion province also announced states of emergency.

Dozens of protesters torched a building belonging to Chile’s oldest newspaper El Mercurio in Valparaiso city on Saturday evening, while elsewhere in the port city a metro station, supermarkets and other stores were burned.

 #ChileDesperto 

The unrest was sparked by a hike in metro fares, which increased from 800 to 830 peso ($1.13 to $1.17) for peak-hour travel, after a 20-peso hike in January.

Pinera announced Saturday he was suspending the fare hike, after the entire metro system was shut down the day prior with protesters burning and vandalizing dozens of stations, leaving some completely charred.

The Santiago Metro, at 140 kilometres (90 miles), is the largest and most modern in South America and a source of great pride for Chileans.

People awoke Saturday to a ravaged city as burned-out buses, bikes and garbage littered streets.

Demonstrators shouted “enough with abuse,” while the hashtag #ChileDesperto — Chile awake — made the rounds on social media.

Pinera’s conservative government has been caught flat-footed by the worst social upheaval in decades.

It declared the state of emergency late Friday and ordered hundreds of troops into the streets.

People were infuriated by a photo of Pinera eating pizza in a restaurant with his family while the city burned.

Throughout Friday, rampaging protesters clashed with riot police in several parts of the capital while the headquarters of the ENEL Chile power company and a Banco Chile branch — both in the city center — were set on fire and heavily damaged.

The state of emergency is initially set for 15 days and restricts freedom of movement and assembly.

 Government ‘perplexed and dazed’ 

The unrest started as a fare-dodging protest mainly by students against the hike in metro ticket prices, blamed on rising oil prices and a weaker peso.

There had been several fare-dodging actions in recent days, organized on social media, but the protests escalated Friday, tapping into general discontent among many Chileans.

Chile has the highest per capita income of Latin America at $20,000, with expected economic growth this year of 2.5 percent and just two percent inflation.

But there is an undercurrent of frustration with rising health care and utility costs, low pensions and social inequality.

The metro fare hike served to wake up a society that was averse to violence after the horrors of the Pinochet dictatorship from 1973-1990, which left more than 3,200 people dead or missing, sociologists say.

AFP

Five Killed In Kashmir As Violence Spikes

Indian flag

 

Two non-Kashmiris were shot dead by suspected militants and three alleged rebels were killed by security forces, police said Wednesday, the deadliest day in the Indian-administered Kashmir valley since New Delhi revoked its autonomy.

The Muslim-majority Himalayan region had been under a strict lockdown since August 5 amid fears of unrest after the Indian government controversially abolished its semi-autonomous status.

Ahead of the autonomy decision, the head of Kashmir’s largest militant group Hizbul Mujahideen, Riyaz Naikoo, had warned that Indians in the territory would become legitimate targets if the valley’s status were changed.

“Militants shot at two apple traders from Punjab — Charanjeet and Sanjeev,” a senior police official told AFP late Wednesday, adding that one of the men died from the incident in Shopian district.

The other trader was in a critical condition in hospital, police added.

In a separate shooting earlier Wednesday, suspected militants killed a migrant labourer in the southern Rohmo village of Pulwama district, police said.

The two men’s deaths came a day after suspected militants killed a truck driver carrying apples, also in Shopian which is the valley’s biggest apple-growing district. His vehicle was set ablaze.

Authorities blocked text messaging services after the driver’s death.

New Delhi had just restored call and text services for mobile phones on Monday, following a 72-day communications blackout, although internet services remain blocked. Landlines were restored previously.

All three killed were not from Kashmir, which has been split between India and Pakistan since 1947 and has been the spark of two wars and numerous skirmishes.

New Delhi sent in tens of thousands of extra troops ahead of the autonomy move in what was already one of the world’s most heavily militarised zones.

 Explosion, gunfire 

Authorities repeatedly said during the lockdown that Kashmir was mostly peaceful.

Since August 5, protests have broken out, several civilians have died and security forces killed several militants in gun battles.

Early Wednesday, soldiers surrounded a residential area near Bijbehara town about 45 kilometres (28 miles) south of the main city of Srinagar after receiving reports about three alleged anti-India rebels.

“Three militants who all appear to be locals were killed in the operation in an exchange of fire, which was started based on intelligence about their presence in a house,” senior police officer Munir Khan told AFP.

Residents told AFP they were woken up by a loud explosion about 3:00 am local time, after which they heard gunfire that carried on intermittently for several hours.

Khan said their bodies were not retrieved from the house but that an automatic assault rifle and one pistol were found after the operation.

A witness told AFP via a mobile phone from the area that soldiers had blown up the house with explosives, sparking a fire that gutted the structure.

It was not clear if it was blown up before or after the gun fight.

An armed rebellion against Indian rule has raged in the valley since 1989, claiming tens of thousands of lives, mostly civilians.

The rebels have demanded independence or to join Pakistan which, like India, claims the region.

AFP