WhatsApp Sues Israeli Firm NSO Over Cyber Spying

whatsapp, video calling

 

WhatsApp on Tuesday sued Israeli technology firm NSO Group, accusing it of using the Facebook-owned messaging service to conduct cyberespionage on journalists, human rights activists and others.

The suit filed in a California federal court contended that NSO Group tried to infect approximately 1,400 “target devices” with malicious software to steal valuable information from those using the messaging app.

WhatsApp head Will Cathcart said the lawsuit was filed after an investigation showed the Israeli firm’s role the cyberattack, despite its denials.

“NSO Group claims they responsibly serve governments, but we found more than 100 human rights defenders and journalists targeted in an attack last May. This abuse must be stopped,” Cathcart said on Twitter.

The lawsuit said the software developed by NSO known as Pegasus was  designed to be remotely installed to hijack devices using the Android, iOS, and BlackBerry operating systems.

The complaint said the attackers “reverse-engineered the WhatsApp app and developed a program to enable them to emulate legitimate WhatsApp network traffic in order to transmit malicious code” to take over the devices.

“While their attack was highly sophisticated, their attempts to cover their tracks were not entirely successful,” Cathcart said in an opinion piece published in the Washington Post, noting that the investigation found internet-hosting services and accounts associated with NSO.

The suit calls on court to order NSO Group to stop any such attacks and asks for unspecified damages.

WhatsApp in May called on users to upgrade the application to plug a security hole that allowed for the injection of sophisticated malware that could be used for spying at the messaging app used by 1.5 billion people around the world.

The malicious code was transmitted through WhatsApp servers from about April 29 to May 10, targeting devices of attorneys, journalists, human rights activists, political dissidents, diplomats, and other senior foreign government officials, according to the complaint.

“A user would receive what appeared to be a video call, but this was not a normal call,” Cathcart said of the cyberattack.

“After the phone rang, the attacker secretly transmitted malicious code in an effort to infect the victim’s phone with spyware. The person did not even have to answer the call.”

 Fighting ‘crime and terror’ 

The NSO Group came to prominence in 2016 when researchers accused it of helping spy on an activist in the United Arab Emirates.

Its best-known product is Pegasus, a highly invasive tool that can reportedly switch on a target’s phone camera and microphone, and access data on it.

The firm has been adamant that it only licenses its software to governments for “fighting crime and terror” and that it investigates credible allegations of misuse, but activists argue the technology has been instead used for human rights abuses.

Danna Ingleton of Amnesty International said the results of the WhatsApp investigation  “underscore that NSO Group continues to profit from its spyware products being used to intimidate, track, and punish scores of human rights defenders across the globe, including the Kingdom of Bahrain, the United Arab Emirates and Mexico.”

Ingleton said Amesty and other groups are seeking in the Israeli courts to block NSO for exporting the technology.

“WhatsApp deserves credit for their tough stance against these malicious attacks, including their efforts to hold NSO to account in the courts,” she said.

AFP

WhatsApp, Instagram Affected As Outage Hits Facebook Services Worldwide

 

Facebook acknowledged Wednesday an outage affecting users in various parts of the world and said it was working on a fix.

Online monitoring service DownDetector reported earlier the outage began around 1200 GMT and affected Facebook as well as its Instagram and WhatsApp services.

#Facebookdown and #instagramdown were trending on Twitter as users around the world reported these apps were not functioning.

Facebook said in a tweet: “We’re aware that some people are having trouble uploading or sending images, videos and other files on our apps. We’re sorry for the trouble and are working to get things back to normal as quickly as possible.”

According to DownDetector, thousands of users around the world were reporting outages with Europe and North America most impacted.

Earlier this year, an outage lasting as long as 24 hours that hit Facebook services was blamed on a “server configuration change.”

The March 13 outage was believed to be the worst ever for the internet giant, which reaches an estimated 2.7 billion people with its core social network, Instagram and messaging applications.

The company did not immediately respond to an AFP query on Wednesday’s outage.

WhatsApp Hack: Is Mobile Ecosystem Secure Anymore?

whatsapp, video calling

Facebook-owned WhatsApp’s revelation of a security flaw allowing hackers to inject spyware on smartphones has raised fresh concerns by many, about the security of the mobile ecosystem.

Here are five key questions and answers:

What happened to WhatsApp?

The security hole in the WhatsApp messaging app could enable an attacker to inject malware to gain access to Android or Apple smartphones.

WhatsApp patched the flaw this week after being informed that the spyware was being used to track human rights activists and lawyers.

Security researchers believe the attackers used the powerful Pegasus spyware from Israel-based NSO Group. According to a recent analysis of the software by the security firm Lookout, Pegasus can “subvert” the device’s security and “steals the victim’s contact list and GPS location, as well as personal, Wi-Fi, and router passwords stored on the device.”

The infection could take root with a simple call through WhatsApp. To make matters worse, victims may not know their phones were infected because the malware allowed attackers to erase call histories.

This delivery was “particularly scary,” said security researcher John Dickson of the Denim Group, because it infected devices without any user action.

“Normally a user has to click on something or go to a site, but that wasn’t the case here,” Dickson said. “And once (the attacker) is in, they own the device, they can do anything.”

Who is to blame?

While the flaw was discovered in WhatsApp, security experts say any application could have been a “vehicle” for the spyware payload.

“We have not yet been able to write software that doesn’t have bugs or flaws,” said Joseph Hall, chief technologist for the Center for Democracy & Technology, a digital rights group.

Hall said the encryption in WhatsApp was not broken and that “Facebook’s response was exceedingly fast.”

Marc Lueck of the security firm Zscaler said that based on Facebook’s response, “You should give them kudos for discovering it in the first place, this was a very deep vulnerability.”

The intrusion at WhatsApp “wasn’t an attack on encryption, it was an attack on another element of the application” said Lueck.

Is encryption still worthwhile?

Encryption remains an important feature by establishing a secure “tunnel” between two parties that verifies their identities, Lueck noted.

“Encryption isn’t important just for privacy, it’s important for trust,” he said.

Encryption used by WhatsApp and other messaging applications prevents eavesdropping on messages and conversations but does not protect against an attack that gains access to the device itself, researchers note.

“End to end encryption does nothing to protect against attacks on your endpoint, true. And seatbelts and airbags do nothing to prevent your car from being hit by a meteorite,” tweeted Matt Blaze, a Georgetown University computer security expert.

“While neither protects against every possible harm, they both remain the most effective defenses against very common harm.”

Dickson said that while no encryption is foolproof, the only way to completely avoid hacking would be to avoid electronics entirely: “You could use guys on horseback.”

Should I worry about being attacked?

Citizen Lab, a research center at the University of Toronto, said in a 2018 report that it found Pegasus spyware infections in 45 countries, with 36 “probable government operators.”

NSO maintains it delivers its software for legitimate law enforcement and intelligence purposes. But the Toronto researchers said it had been obtained by countries with “dubious” human rights records and suggested it may have been used by Saudi Arabia to track and kill dissident journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Citizen Lab researchers wrote in the Globe & Mail that they “unearthed at least 25 cases of abusive targeting of advocacy groups, lawyers, scientists and researchers, investigators into mass disappearances and media members.”

But Lueck said programs such as Pegasus are extremely costly and cannot easily be monetized by hackers for profit.

“Your average person is not the target of this specific piece of software, which is built to sell to governments to target individuals and doesn’t work on a large scale,” he said.

Still, Lueck said the flaw underscores the fact that “the mobile phone ecosystem has become as insecure and as vulnerable a platform as the computer.”

 

Do governments need better digital tools?

The revelations come as governments seek better tools to track criminals and extremists using encrypted messaging. An Australian law requires tech giants to remove electronic protections and help with access to devices or services.

Law enforcement agencies have complained of “going dark” in the face of encrypted electronic communications as they investigate serious crimes like terrorism and child sex offenses.

But Hall said that the news about Pegasus shows governments have tools to exploit software flaws for specific targeting without weakening encryption and privacy for all users.

“You can target the delivery at specific people rather than breaking into everyone’s phone at once,” he said.

AFP

WhatsApp Hack: A Latest Breach Of Personal Data Security

whatsapp, video calling

 

The hacking of WhatsApp — in which spyware was sneaked into phones, compromising personal data — is one of the most spectacular of a series of such attacks in recent years.

The instant messaging service used by 1.5 billion people worldwide said Tuesday a security breach had allowed sophisticated attackers to install the malicious software into phones via its app.

Here are some previous cases of a similar kind.

Yahoo, billions hacked

In what is considered the biggest cyberattack in history, a 2013 hack affected all three billion accounts at Yahoo.

Another attack on Yahoo, blamed on Russian hackers, affected some 500 million accounts in 2014, with stolen data including usernames, email addresses and birthdates.

It was only revealed in September 2016 and resulted in fine of $35 million in 2018 for its then-financial arm, Altaba.

 

 Taking aim at Target

The US retail giant was hit by a computer attack in 2013 that affected 110 million clients.

Seventy million might have lost personal data including names, addresses, phone numbers and e-mail accounts, while 40 million bank accounts and credit cards were also put at risk.

 

Password plunder

In 2014 online data protection firm Hold Security claimed that Russian hackers had accessed 1.2 billion passwords linked to 420,000 internet sites around the world, from corporate giants to individual accounts.

Hold Security pointed to a group of hackers called “CyberVor”, which it said had potentially gained access to 500 million e-mail accounts.

 

South Korea panic

In 2014 the personal data of at least 20 million bank and credit card users in South Korea was leaked in one of the country’s biggest ever breaches.

An employee from personal credit ratings firm Korea Credit Bureau (KCB) had stolen the data from customers of three credit card firms and sold it to phone marketing companies.

 

Hottest hack

In 2015 hackers calling themselves The Impact Team published nearly 30 gigabytes of files including the names and sexual orientation of people who had signed up with Ashley Madison, a website facilitating extra-marital affairs.

The company’s boss stepped down as several suicides in the United States and Canada were linked to the revelations.

Ashley Madison had earlier offered to delete users’ personal data for a modest fee but did not.

 

Uber off the road

The ride-sharing giant was vilified after the hacking in 2016 of data on 57 million of its riders and drivers, unveiled only in November 2017.

It was also criticised for paying the hackers $100,000 to destroy their booty.

Uber was fined $148 million for covering up the fraud, and was also prosecuted in The Netherlands and Britain.

 

 Equifax loses credit

A breach by major American credit agency Equifax in 2017 might have affected more than 147 million US clients, plus others from Canada and Britain.

The company was sued for having identified but not corrected the breach, having insufficient security systems and delaying reporting the problem.

 

Facebook under fire

In 2018 hackers exploited a trio of software flaws to access the personal data of 29 million Facebook users, getting hold of names, phone numbers and email addresses.

The breach sparked renewed criticisms of Facebook after it acknowledged that tens of millions of users had their personal data hijacked by Cambridge Analytica, a political firm working for Donald Trump in 2016.

 

Intrusion at Marriott

Global hotel giant Marriott International said in November 2018 up to 383 million guests may have been victims of a hack, involving five million passport numbers and less than 2,000 credit card numbers.

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo blamed China.

AFP

Hackers Exploit WhatsApp Flaw To Install Spyware

whatsapp, video calling

 

A security flaw in WhatsApp, one of the most popular messaging apps in the world, allowed sophisticated attackers to install spyware on phones, the company said on Tuesday, in the latest trouble for its parent Facebook.

The vulnerability — first reported by the Financial Times, and fixed in the latest WhatsApp update — allowed hackers to insert malicious software on phones by calling the target using the app, which is used by 1.5 billion people around the world.

The FT cited a spyware dealer as saying the tool was developed by a shadowy Israel-based firm called the NSO Group, which has been accused of helping governments from the Middle East to Mexico snoop on activists and journalists. Security researchers said the malicious code bore similarities to other tech developed by the firm, according to The New York Times.

The latest exploit — which impacts Android devices and Apple’s iPhones, among others — was discovered earlier this month and WhatsApp scrambled to fix it, rolling out an update in less than 10 days.

“WhatsApp encourages people to upgrade to the latest version of our app, as well as keep their mobile operating system up to date, to protect against potential targeted exploits designed to compromise information stored on mobile devices,” a spokesperson said in a statement to AFP.

The firm did not comment on the number of users affected or who targeted them, and said it had reported the matter to US authorities.

The breach is the latest in a series of issues troubling WhatsApp’s parent Facebook, which has faced intense criticism for allowing its users’ data to be harvested by research companies and over its slow response to Russia using the platform as a means to spread disinformation during the 2016 US election campaign.

Highly invasive software

The WhatsApp spyware is sophisticated and “would be available to only advanced and highly motivated actors”, the company said, adding that a “select number of users were targeted”.

“This attack has all the hallmarks of a private company that works with a number of governments around the world” according to initial investigations, it added, but did not name the firm.

WhatsApp has briefed human rights organizations on the matter, but did not identify them.

The Citizen Lab, a research group at the University of Toronto, said in a tweet it believed an attacker tried to target a human rights lawyer as recently as Sunday using this flaw, but was blocked by WhatsApp.

The NSO Group came to prominence in 2016 when researchers accused it of helping spy on an activist in the United Arab Emirates. Its best-known product is Pegasus, a highly invasive tool that can reportedly switch on a target’s phone camera and microphone, and access data on it.

The firm said Tuesday that it only licenses its software to governments for “fighting crime and terror”.

The NSO Group “does not operate the system, and after a rigorous licensing and vetting process, intelligence and law enforcement determine how to use the technology to support their public safety missions”, it said in a statement to AFP.

“We investigate any credible allegations of misuse and if necessary, we take action, including shutting down the system.”

AFP

‘Think Before You Tweet’, Obama Warns Leaders

Trump's Repeal Of Migrant Amnesty 'Cruel' – Obama
 Former US President Barack Obama. Photo: SCOTT OLSON / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / AFPObama

Former US president Barack Obama said Friday that social media powers like Facebook, WhatsApp and Twitter are leading to “snap judgements to complex issues” and warned leaders to think before tweeting.

Obama was repeatedly asked about his successor, President Donald Trump, at a New Delhi symposium but stuck to a general warning to all high-profile figures to take care.

“I think it’s important to be mindful of both the power of these tools but also its limits,” Obama said when asked about the dangers of Twitter, a platform on which Trump has caused repeat controversies.

“What I would say is Twitter, Facebook, WhatsApp, all these various platforms are extraordinarily powerful tools, and those tools can be used for good and they tools can be used for ill,” he said.

Highlighting how he has 100 million Twitter followers — “more than other people who use it more often” — Obama said: “I think it’s important to be mindful of both the power of these tools but also its limits.”

Obama’s wife Michelle recently took what was seen as a subtle swipe at Trump, asking the audience at an event to spellcheck and not tweet everything that comes into their mind.

“I think she was just giving a general advice, the same advice that you used to hear from your mother generally … don’t say the first thing that pops in your head,” the two-term leader told the conference, which was organised by the Hindustan Times newspaper.

“Your mother and father knew better. Listen to them. Don’t do things like that. Think before you speak, think before you tweet.”

– ‘Destructive populism’ –

Obama was more direct in criticising Trump’s threat to leave the 2015 Paris climate accord on slashing global carbon emissions.

“It is an agreement that — even though we have a little bit of a pause in American leadership — is giving our children a fighting chance,” he said.

Trump has threatened several times to withdraw from the Paris accord saying it is crippling US business. He has called for the agreement to be renegotiated.

Obama would not be drawn into other questions about the US administration at the appearance where he called “destructive populism” a threat to modern democracy.

“The thing I love about America and I suspect the thing you love about India is just this cacophony of life and it throws up all kinds of variety,” Obama said in response to one attempt to force a comment on Trump.

“There are political trends in American that I don’t agree with and abide by but I recognise as part of a running thread in American life.”

Obama said he has become “obsessed” with the way news is handled and consumed, particularly by the young.

“We are more connected than ever before but … more and more we are fitting facts to suit our opinions rather than formulating our opinions based on facts,” said Obama, who was in China before visiting India, and next goes to Paris.

Read Also: Trump Retweets Anti-Muslim Videos  

AFP

Ogun State Police Arrest Suspect For Impersonating Ooni Of Ife

Man Arrested For Raping 13-year Old GirlThe Ogun State Police Command have arrested Abiodun Joseph, 26, for opening WhatsApp and Facebook accounts using the picture of the Ooni of Ife, Oba Ogunwusi Adeyeye, to dupe unsuspecting members of the public.

Parading the suspect alongside other suspects, the Ogun State Commissioner of Police, Ahmed Iliyasu, said the suspect was arrested while perfecting his plan to dupe another individual after defrauding two persons of N600,000.

“On Wednesday, an information was received about a man impersonating the Ooni of Ife, Oba Ogunwusi Adeyeye, on Facebook and WhatsApp platforms to defraud unsuspecting members of the public.

“Upon information, Policemen attached to Ijebu Ode Area Command swung into action and subsequently arrested one Abiodun Joseph, 26,” the commissioner said.

The suspect confessed to the crime while being paraded.

“I opened a WhatsApp and Facebook accounts using the Ooni’s picture and I have duped two people to the tune of N600,000, though I am regretting my action.

“When I left secondary school, I had no sponsor to allow me further my education, so I learned how to repair phones and computers. That is what I have been doing before I was arrested by the Police for impersonation,” he said.

The command also paraded two other suspects for armed robbery and kidnapping, while another was allegedly killed after a gun duel with the police.

“Today, April 24, some hoodlums numbering about eight came to Obalende at Ijebu Ode with the intent to attack and kidnap expatriate of 6×6 quarry, they came in a truck with some of them dressed in full military uniform.

“But they were accosted by our anti robbery team from Obalende who engaged them in a gun duel, at the end of the encounter, one of them was fatally injured, one arrested and others fled,” the commissioner of Police stated.

Items recovered from the suspects were two pump action guns, four locally made single barrel gun, 75 live cartridges and sum of 87,600 naira.

While assuring members of the general public of their safety, the Commissioner of Police, however, sought the cooperation and understanding of residents on intelligence sharing and information that could lead to the arrest of criminals in the state.

Police Threaten To Dismiss Officials Misusing Firearms

arms, cultists, suspected criminals, Illegal Weapons, AmnestyThe Nigeria Police Force says it will sanction officials engaging in brutality and unprofessional misconducts in the discharge of their duties.

This warning was issued by the Police Commissioner of the the Ekiti State Command, Mr Wilson Inalegwu.

He said the cases of brutality had become an intolerable albatross of the Force, promising that it would be tackled to restore dignity in the nation’s policing system.

As part of efforts to address the trend, the police on Monday flagged off Public complains Rapid Response Unit in the state to collate complaints from the public.

Mr Inalegwu threatened that any police found culpable of professional misconduct by way of incivility or mishandling of weapons would be dismissed and prosecuted in line with the directive of the Inspector General of Police, Mr Ibrahim Idris.

Responsive Police

At the flag off ceremony held at the Okesa Police station in Ado Ekiti, Mr Inalegwu, disclosed that the unit was established to offer 24 hours services to the public by way of receiving complaints about public mis-demeanour of his men in their dealings with the citizens.

“The Public Complaint Rapid Response Unit is saddled with the responsibility of receiving and resolving complaints of police professional misconduct emanating from policing activities and operations .

“We have a way of dealing with misconduct in the police. The Commissioners of police can decide cases involving rank and file while the police Service Commission can deal with those from Assistant Superintendent of Police to the topmost officer.

“Whichever way it happens, professional misconduct won’t be tolerated. We won’t tolerate senseless killings of innocent Nigerians or misuse of firearms and any officer engaging in such will be investigated and will be dismissed and prosecuted if found guilty,” he stressed.

On the mode of operation of the unit, the Police Commissioner said: “The unit is available 24 hours a day to listen to members of the public from across the state. In line with the change agenda of the Federal Government and the change Begins with me campaign of the police Force.

“The unit has provided seven different platforms which are inscribed on the flyers through which the public can reach the unit- phone calls, SMS, Whatsapp, blackberry Messenger, Twitter, Facebook and e-mail.

“It would be recalled that on assumption of duty, IGP Idris promised Nigerians that the police Force will be repositioned to be more accountable, responsive, responsible and reliable”.

Mr Inalegwu added that the police would continue to make themselves accessible to the public and regain the confidence and reemphasize the ‘police is your friend’ mantra of the force.

“The police force must be responsible and responsive and we must gain public confidence so that the people can cooperate, appreciate and support the police throughout the state in carrying out their constitutional duties and other tasks associated with protection of lives and property,” he emphasised.

WhatsApp Introduces New Video Calling Feature

whatsapp, video callingSocial media application, WhatsApp, on November 14, 2016, announced its next step in efforts to connect people – WhatsApp video calling.

Via the application’s site, it stated “today we’re excited to announce the next step in our efforts to connect people – WhatsApp video calling.

“In the coming days, WhatsApp’s more than one billion users, can make video calls across Android, iPhone, and Windows Phone devices”.

The application which started as an alternative to SMS, “now supports sending and receiving a variety of media: text, photos, videos, documents, and location, as well as voice calls,” the group said.

WhatsApp was founded by Jan Koum and Brian Acton who had previously spent 20 years combined at Yahoo.

In 2014, it joined Facebook, but has continued to operate as a separate app, with a laser focus on building a messaging service that works fast and reliably anywhere in the world.

“Our goal at WhatsApp has always been to help as many people as possible stay in touch with friends, family, and others they care about. That means making a product that’s simple, easy to use, and accessible no matter where you are.

“We started with messaging and Group Chat. Then we added voice calling. And we did it in a way that works across thousands of device and platform combinations all over the world.”

Stating reasons for the latest development, the group explained: “We’re introducing this feature because we know that sometimes voice and text just aren’t enough.

“There’s no substitute for watching your grandchild take her first steps, or seeing your daughter’s face while she’s studying abroad. And we want to make these features available to everyone, not just those who can afford the most expensive new phones or live in countries with the best cellular networks.

“Over the years we’ve received many requests from our users for video calling, and we’re excited to finally offer this feature to the world.

They expressed appreciation to users of the app, while promising to “keep working hard every day to improve the service”.

Facebook Defends Data Sharing With WhatsApp

Facebook-Ime-Archibong-WhatsAppTech giant, Facebook has defended its proposed data sharing scheme with messaging application, WhatsApp.

The Director of Global Products Partnership at Facebook, Mr Ime Archibong, explained the reasons for the policy on Wednesday in Lagos State, southwest Nigeria.

“One of the policy changes that we made recently was all about trying to make sure we could unlock the business user connections that already exist,” he said.

Archibong told Channels Television that the plan would enable small scale business owners to leverage on WhatsApp, as a powerful platform for their businesses.

He also expressed optimism that the development would contribute greatly to the growth of Africa and the world at large.

“It is going to be really good for the continent. It will be really good for countries around the world and I’m pretty excited about it,” he said.

The Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, on Tuesday arrived in Nigeria on his first trip to sub-Saharan Africa.

Facebook Founder, Mark Zuckerberg,
Facebook Founder, Mark Zuckerberg, with tech developers in Lagos

Zuckerberg had used his time in the country to visit the Yaba technology hub in Lagos, met with developers and partners, as well as explored the Nollywood.

He said he would also listen, learn and take ideas back to California on how Facebook could further support tech development and entrepreneurship across Africa.

How To Add Bold, Italic And Crossed Words To Messages On Whatsapp

WhatsappCross-platform mobile messaging app, Whatsapp, has announced the latest upgrade to its application.

The upgrade, though small compared to more recent additions, allows users to write in different formats.

The latest addition can be used to add emphasis to certain words when sending messages. Users can add certain characters before and after the words or sentences to make them go bold, italic or with a line through the centre, known as a strikethrough.

The feature was originally tested in beta but has now been rolled out to iOS and Android users as part of the most recent update.

Other recent additions include the blue ticks that reveal if a message has been read, which have now been made visible on the chat list screen.

Messages can be ‘starred’, to save them for later, and as part of the previous iPhone update, the messaging service let users send files.

Pushed out to iOS platforms last month, the update introduced a total of five new features to WhatsApp users on iPhone.

Users can now share photos, images and other files stored on other third party apps – including iCloud, Google Drive, Dropbox and Microsoft’s OneDrive – with their contacts on WhatsApp.

Beyond photos, the app added the ability to send and received PDF files. Once users receive the file they can see an in-line preview.

Tapping the preview image while it is displayed will open the PDF in the iOS document viewer.

To make text appear bold, type an asterisk before and after the text e.g. *ChannelsTelevision*

To make text appear italicised, the underscore character needs to be typed before and after the text e.g. _ ChannelsTelevision _

And to strikethrough a word, type the tilde character before and after the text e.g. ~ChannelsTelevision ~

Users can also additionally apply all three formats to a word: *~_ChannelsTelevision_~*

Channels TV Mobile App Ranks First In Nigeria

Channels Television’s online platform has once again blazed the trail as its mobile phone application on the Apple and Google Play stores tops the chart of the most downloaded free applications in Nigeria.
Channels Tv’s application is ranked above social media giants Whatsapp, Instagram, YouTube, Google Maps, Google Plus and Skype.
Cable News Network (CNN) ranks 23rd on the ranking while the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) comes in at 173rd position.  Sports news agency Super Sport ranks 117th.
While in the world rankings, Channels TV mobile application is ranked 1st in Africa and 16th in the world.
The App is the most downloaded App in Nigeria ahead of CNN, BBC and Super Sport.