3.2 Billion People At Risk Of Malaria Globally – Who Report

malaria attack The World Health Organisation (WHO), says about 3.2 billion people remain at risk to malaria attack globally.

A WHO report released on Monday on World Malaria Day entitled: “Eliminating Malaria”says that in 2015 alone, 214 million new cases of the disease were reported in 95 countries and no fewer than 400,000 people died of the disease.

The report is coming a year after the World Health Assembly resolved to eliminate malaria from at least 35 countries by 2030. The report shows the goal, although ambitious, is achievable.

In 2015, all countries in the WHO European Region reported, for the first time, zero indigenous cases of malaria, down from 90 000 cases in 1995. Outside this region, eight countries reported zero cases of the disease in 2014 – Argentina, Costa Rica, Iraq, Morocco, Oman, Paraguay, Sri Lanka and United Arab Emirates.

A statement by a spokesperson for WHO, Christian Lindmeier, said, the “Global Technical Strategy for Malaria 2016-2030”, approved by the World Health Assembly in 2015, calls for the elimination of local transmission of malaria in at least 10 countries by 2020.

WHO’s estimates show that 21 countries are in a position to achieve this goal, including six countries in the African region, where the burden of the disease is heaviest.

“Our report shines a spotlight on countries that are well on their way to eliminating malaria,” the Director of the WHO Global Malaria Programme, Dr Pedro Alonso said.

“WHO commends these countries while also highlighting the urgent need for greater investment in settings with high rates of malaria transmission, particularly in Africa. Saving lives must be our first priority.”

Since the year 2000, malaria mortality rates have declined by 60% globally. In the WHO African Region, malaria mortality rates fell by 66% among all age groups and by 71% among children under five years.

WHO pointed out that reaching the goals of the “Global Technical Strategy” would require a steep increase in global and domestic funding—from $2.5 billion today to an estimated $8.7 billion annually by 2030.

“Through robust financing and political will, affected countries can speed progress towards malaria elimination and contribute to the broader development agenda as laid out in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” it stressed.

World Health Meeting Opens In Geneva

Child receiving the polio vaccine

Over 2,000 delegates from around the world gathered in Geneva, Switzerland, on Monday, as the World Health Assembly meeting opens to deliberate on a dozen of issues including climate change and health, drug resistance and how to reduce the impact of non-communicable diseases.

As the meeting opens, the World Health Organisation’s Director-General, Dr Margaret Chan, voiced her deep concern about worldwide increase in childhood obesity, with numbers climbing fastest in developing countries.

At the end of the five-day meeting the supreme decision-making body of the World Health Organisation (WHO) will take its stand on the issues.

Delegates from Africa joined others to make up the 194 WHO member countries attending the 67th world health meeting where decisions that promote health and ease the burden of global diseases are taken.

Like his counterparts from other countries, Nigeria’s Minister of Health, Dr Onyebuchi Chukwu, said Nigeria had made tangible efforts at addressing health issues.

The delegates will hold discussion that will provide workable resolutions to health challenges around the world.