South Africa’s Top Court Stands By Order To Jail Zuma

In this file photo taken on July 04, 2021 Former South African president Jacob Zuma addresses the media in his home in Nkandla, KwaZulu-Natal. Emmanuel Croset / AFP

 

South Africa’s highest court on Friday stood by its order to imprison Jacob Zuma, accusing the former president of “litigious skullduggery” in a scathing ruling that accused him of undermining the courts.

The case however does not affect Zuma’s release on medical parole earlier this month, which sparked an uproar amid allegations of irregularities in the parole process.

His jailing in July sparked the worst outbreak of political violence since the end of apartheid, as his supporters staged violent protests that devolved into widespread looting of malls and warehouses.

The 79-year-old had asked the Constitutional Court to rescind its decision to sentence him to 15 months in prison for refusing to answer questions in a corruption investigation.

“The application for recision is dismissed,” said Justice Sisi Khampepe.

Zuma’s lawyers had argued that the decision should be rescinded because he had not attended the proceedings.

“The majority emphatically reject any suggestion that litigants can be allowed to butcher of their own will a judicial process which in all respects has been carried out with the utmost degree of regularity, only to later plead the absent victim,” Khampepe said.

The ruling accused Zuma of “litigious skullduggery” in seeking to set aside his prison sentence.

READ ALSO: [COVID-19] South Africa Announces ‘Vaccine Passport’ Plans, Eases Restrictions

This case did not consider Zuma’s release on medical parole on September 6.

Zuma, who retains pockets of support with the ruling African National Congress, was president from 2009 to 2018.

He took office after being acquitted of raping a friend’s adult daughter and his administration was plagued by multiple scandals.

His time in office became known as “state capture” for allegedly giving out political favours and mis-spending, which are the focus of a three-year public inquiry.

Zuma’s refusal to appear before the inquiry is what led the Constitutional Court to order his 15-month imprisonment. Because the court’s orders cannot be appealed, Zuma sought to have it “rescinded.”

Zuma’s claims “are devoid of merit,” the judge said.

AFP

Mourners Pay Tribute To Late South African Zulu King

In this file photo taken on October 07, 2018 Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini greets his supporters at The Moses Mabhida Football Stadium in Durban during Umkhosi Welembe, an annual commemoration of Zulu King Shaka ka Senzangakhona, a revered military strategist who united the tribes to form the Zulu Nation. Highly-revered king of South Africa’s Zulu nation Goodwill Zwelithini, died on March 12, 2021 after weeks of hospitalisation his palace announced. He was aged 72.
RAJESH JANTILAL / AFP

 

 

Clad in leopard skins and colourful beads, hundreds of mourners on Wednesday gathered to pay their respects to the king of the Zulus, South Africa’s largest ethnic group, who died of illness last week.

King Goodwill Zwelithini was the longest-serving monarch in Zulu history, reigning for half a century through years of apartheid and democratic transition.

He died early on Friday in the eastern city of Durban, aged 72, after weeks of treatment for a diabetes-related illness.

His remains have been taken back to his birthplace, the small southeastern town of Nongoma in Kwa-Zulu Natal province, where he will be laid to rest after midnight.

The intimate ceremony, to be conducted behind closed doors at the KwaKhethomthandayo royal residence, is referred to as a “planting” rather than a burial.

Women in elaborate necklaces and headbands danced and sang as they paraded towards the mortuary where Zwelithini’s body is being kept.

Men known as “amaButho”, Zulu regiments, followed the maidens in traditional leopard skins and ostrich feathers — wielding spears, shields and clubs known as “knobkerries”.

The procession marched behind a banner that read “thank you for being the shining light of hope”.

Although his title did not bestow executive power, the charismatic king still had moral influence over more than 11 million Zulus, nearly a fifth of the country’s population.

Zwelithini basked in the legacy of famous and defiant Zulu kings — his ancestors — who inflicted one of the British Empire’s worst defeats in 1879.

But he was also accused of playing into the hands of the apartheid system’s fight against the then banned African National Congress party, which opposed white minority rule.

Following his death, a local newspaper described him as the “custodian of Zulu culture” but also as a “useful idiot in the hands of the apartheid government”.

South Africa’s traditional leaders have been constitutionally recognised since the end of apartheid, and continue to play important symbolic and spiritual roles.

They advise legislators and have a say in cultural, land management and justice administration in their territories.

The Zulu king remains the most influential of all these leaders.

Zwelithini’s successor has yet to be disclosed.

The monarch had six wives and 28 children.

But his first son, who would traditionally have inherited the throne, was killed in Johannesburg last November.

The Zulus are popularly known for their vibrant culture, especially an ancient war dance performed by the rhythmic stomping of feet.

They do not refer to a deceased kind as “dead”, but say the monarch has “bowed”.

South Africa’s Largest Ethnic Group, Zulus Await New King

(FILES) Highly-revered king of South Africa’s Zulu nation Goodwill Zwelithini, died on March 12, 2021 after weeks of hospitalisation his palace announced. He was aged 72. (Photo by WALTER DHLADHLA / AFP)

 

 

South Africa’s largest ethnic group, the Zulus, will bid farewell on Thursday to their king, Goodwill Zwelithini, who for half a century was their charismatic but also controversial figurehead.

The longest-serving king in Zulu history, the monarch died on Friday after 50 years on the throne.

Under Zulu funeral rites, he should be interred by a few select men — an event the palace calls a “planting” of his remains rather than a burial.

The Zulus are popularly known for their vibrant culture, especially the timeless and riveting ancient war dance performed by the rhythmic stomping of feet.

The late king exuded the image of a traditional chief, typically sporting a poncho-like leopard-skin chest cover and wielding an unquestionable spiritual authority.

He spoke to powerful political leaders, and appeared in public with Nelson Mandela.

He also had visits from President Cyril Ramaphosa and ex-president Jacob Zuma, during which they were seen performing the gripping Zulu war dance, known as “umzansi.”

Even though he lacked executive power under the South African system, he still had moral clout over more than 11 million Zulus, nearly a fifth  of the country’s population.

At the fall of apartheid, traditional leaders were constitutionally recognised and they continue to play an important symbolic and spiritual role.

They advise legislators and have a say in cultural, land management and justice administration in their territories. The Zulu king remains the most influential of all these traditional leaders.

‘Intricate’ succession choice

For now, secrecy shrouds the identity of Zwelithini’s successor, although the question is on everybody’s lips.

Ordinarily, it would have been the eldest son born to the senior of his six wives, with whom he sired 28 children.

But his first son, Prince Lethukuthula Zulu, was killed aged 50 last November at his Johannesburg home.

It is a “complicating factor” that the man who would likely have been the “designated” king is already dead, said Somadoda Fikeni, a cultural heritage expert.

Historian and cultural analyst Ntuli Pikita said that while the palace will have resorted to a “very intricate way” of picking the successor, its inner circle should know already who the next king will be.

– ‘Useful idiot’ –
Enjoying legitimacy as a descendant of famous and defiant kings who inflicted one of the British Empire’s worst defeats in the 1879 Anglo-Zulu war, Zwelithini was also divisive.

Following his death, a local newspaper described him as the “custodian of Zulu culture” but also as a “useful idiot in the hands of the apartheid government”.

During the twilight of the white minority regime in the 1990s, the Zulu nation, through the nationalist Inkatha Freedom Party, was accused of playing into the hands of the apartheid system’s fight against Mandela’s African National Congress (ANC).

The deadly inter-party conflict, said to have been aimed at destabilising the ANC and the inevitable arrival of democracy, claimed hundreds of lives.

Having survived colonialism and apartheid, the Zulu nation embraced democracy, and the newly formed “rainbow nation” of South Africa secured a guarantee of stability.

Nationwide, the state pays several hundred traditional chiefs, including a dozen kings and queens.

They ensure that customs are respected, reflecting the complexity of South African society where less than a tenth of the population speak English as their mother tongue.

Muyiwa Set To Drop ‘Eko Ile’ On October 30

Muyiwa Set To Drop 'Eko Ile' On October 30UK-based Nigerian gospel artist, Olanrewaju Muyiwa, says his first all-African album ‘Eko Ile’ will be out on October 30.

The United Kingdom’s most prolific gospel artist noted that a UK tour announcement would follow the release of the dynamic 10-track album.

‘Eko Ile’ follows the success of Live at the Apollo (2012), the live CD and DVD recorded at his sold-out Hammersmith Apollo show with Riversongz, his charismatic Afro-gospel band.

Muyiwa explained in a statement that ‘Eko Ile’ is a return to his roots translating to ‘Lagos my home’ which harks to a Nigerian folk song of the same name. Muyiwa channels a myriad of African music styles via gospel.

“Written alongside Kwame Yeboah (Michael Jackson, Stevie Wonder, Ms. Dynamite) and Eddie Martin (Whitney Houston, Neyo, Chris Brown) and produced by the former, the album is a journey from east to west of the continent, stopping off at high-life reminiscent of fellow countryman Fela Kuti, refreshed takes on traditional African praise, and African reggae,” he said in the statement.

“It makes sense then, that the album was predominantly recorded in Ghana, that it frequently features Muyiwa’s native Nigerian tongue of Yoruba and that it’s peppered with Swahili, Zulu, and Pidgin English.”