Three Die In Slovakia Plane Crash

(Illustrative Purposes Only) Rescuers and experts work on the place of the Antonov-26 transport aircraft crash at Chuhuiv military airbase around 30 kilometers southeast of Kharkiv. 
SERGEY BOBOK / AFP

 

 

Three people were killed when their small plane crashed near the village of Mokry Haj in western Slovakia on Friday, the emergency services said.

The four-seater plane was registered in neighbouring Czech Republic and was flying from there when it crashed at 0840 GMT near the Czech border.

“Three people were found by members of the Fire and Rescue Service without signs of life,” a spokeswoman for the rescue service, Lena Kostalova, told AFP.

The accident occurred around 100 kilometres (62 miles) from the Slovak capital Bratislava.

“After the crash, the plane burst into flames. The accident claimed three victims and it was probably a crew from the Czech Republic”, the regional police force said on Facebook.

Families Of Indonesia Jet Crash Victims Hold Memorial At Sea

Indonesian Navy divers hold wreckage from Sriwijaya Air flight SJY182 during a search and rescue operation at sea near Lancang island on January 10, 2021, after the Boeing 737-500 crashed shortly after taking off from Jakarta airport on January 9. (Photo Credit: AFP)

 

Relatives of 62 people killed when an Indonesian passenger jet slammed into the sea scattered flowers at the crash site Friday, as investigators look for clues to why the plane dropped from the sky minutes after takeoff.

The memorial came as the search for human remains and wreckage ended two weeks after the Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-500 plunged roughly 10,000 feet (3,000 metres) in less than a minute before crashing into waters off Jakarta.

However, the hunt continues for a still-missing cockpit voice recorder, as investigators pore over details from a retrieved flight data recorder — so-called black boxes that could be critical to the probe.

 

Divers bringing up bags filled with debris and body parts to a search and rescue boat from Sriwijaya Air flight SJ182 off the coast north of Jakarta on January 11, 2021, during search operations off the coast for the Boeing 737-500 which crashed into the Java Sea minutes after takeoff on January 9. (Photo by Demy Sanjaya / AFP)

 

 

Maintenance logs pointed to an issue with the plane’s autothrottle, which controls engine power, authorities said, but it was not clear what role — if any — the apparent malfunction played.

On Friday, dozens of relatives tossed red petals from the deck of a navy ship, some overcome with emotion.

“When I cast the flowers I could see my sister’s face on the surface of the water,” said Heri Purnomo, whose older sibling Agus Minardi and her husband were on the flight.

“I burst into tears… It was a very sad moment.”

Jefferson Irwin Jauwena, the airline’s president director, said he was “devastated” by the accident which claimed 12 crew lives.

“We also feel sad and lost,” he said.

 

Relatives of the passengers wait for news at the Supadio airport in Pontianak, on Indonesia’s Borneo island, on January 9, 2021. © Louis Anderson, AFP

 

So far, 47 of the 62 victims have been identified through fingerprints and DNA matches to living family.

But Bety Saprianti, 33, who lost five relatives, is waiting for her aunt to be officially identified.

“We did not attend the ceremony today. None of our family joined — it was too painful,” she said.

“Our only hope now is (the last) of our relatives is identified soon.”

The 26-year-old plane crashed just four minutes after setting off from Jakarta, bound for Pontianak city on Borneo island, a 90-minute flight away.

Authorities said the crew did not declare an emergency or report technical problems with the aircraft before its dive, and that it was probably intact when it hit the water — citing a relatively small area where the wreckage was scattered.

The crash probe is likely to take months, but a preliminary report is expected next month.

Missing Indonesia Plane Suspected To Have Crashed With 62 Passengers, Crew On Board

This file photo taken over Tangerang on March 18, 2013 shows a Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-300 aircraft, a similar model to the Indonesian airline's Boeing 737-500 operating as flight SJY182 that lost contact during a flight from Jakarta to Pontianak on January 9, 2021. Adek BERRY / AFP
This file photo taken over Tangerang on March 18, 2013 shows a Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-300 aircraft, a similar model to the Indonesian airline’s Boeing 737-500 operating as flight SJY182 that lost contact during a flight from Jakarta to Pontianak on January 9, 2021. Adek BERRY / AFP

 

An Indonesian budget airline plane with 62 people on board is suspected to have crashed into the sea shortly after the Boeing 737 took off from Jakarta airport on Saturday, authorities said.

Flight tracking data showed the Sriwijaya Air Boeing 737-500 plunged into a steep dive about four minutes after it left Soekarno-Hatta international airport.

Sixty-two passengers and crew were on board, including 10 children, the nation’s transport minister, Budi Karya Sumadi, told reporters.

The suspected crash site is near tourist islands just off the coast of Indonesia’s sprawling capital.

Sriwijaya Air flight SJ182 was bound for Pontianak on Indonesia’s section of Borneo island, about 90 minutes flying time over the Java Sea.

Distraught relatives waited nervously for news at the city’s airport.

“I have four family members on the flight — my wife and my three children,” Yaman Zai said as he sobbed.

Relatives of passengers on board missing Sriwijaya Air flight SJY182 wait for news at the Supadio airport in Pontianak on January 9, 2021, after contact with the aircraft was lost shortly after take-off from Jakarta.  Louis ANDERSON / AFP
Relatives of passengers on board missing Sriwijaya Air flight SJY182 wait for news at the Supadio airport in Pontianak on January 9, 2021, after contact with the aircraft was lost shortly after take-off from Jakarta. Louis ANDERSON / AFP

 

“(My wife) sent me a picture of the baby today…How could my heart not be torn into pieces?”

The plane took off on Saturday afternoon and a search and rescue operation began with no official results available on Saturday night.

“We deployed our team, boats and sea riders to the location suspected to be where it went down after losing contact,” Bambang Suryo Aji, a senior official at the search-and-rescue agency, told reporters after nightfall.

Sudden plunge

Data from FlightRadar24 said the plane reached an altitude of nearly 11,000 feet (3,350 metres) before dropping suddenly to 250 feet. It then lost contact with air traffic control.

“Sriwijaya Air flight #SJ182 lost more than 10,000 feet of altitude in less than one minute, about 4 minutes after departure from Jakarta,” the tracking agency said on its official Twitter account.

Broadcaster Kompas TV quoted local fishermen as saying they had found debris near islands just off the coast of the capital Jakarta, but it could not be immediately confirmed as having belonged to the missing jet.

Authorities and the airline gave no immediate indication as to why the plane suddenly went down.

Marines load supplies and equipment on a ship for a search and rescue operation for the Sriwijaya Air flight SJY182 in Jakarta on January 9, 2021, as the aircraft is suspected to have crashed into the sea. Dany Krisnadhi / AFP
Marines load supplies and equipment on a ship for a search and rescue operation for the Sriwijaya Air flight SJY182 in Jakarta on January 9, 2021, as the aircraft is suspected to have crashed into the sea. Dany Krisnadhi / AFP

 

The budget airline, which has about 19 Boeing jets that fly to destinations in Indonesia and Southeast Asia, said only that it was investigating the loss of contact.

In October 2018, 189 people were killed when a Lion Air Boeing 737 MAX jet slammed into the Java Sea about 12 minutes after take-off from Jakarta on a routine one-hour flight.

That crash — and a subsequent fatal flight in Ethiopia — saw Boeing hit with $2.5 billion in fines over claims it defrauded regulators overseeing the 737 MAX model, which was grounded worldwide following the two deadly crashes.

The Boeing jet thought to have crashed Saturday is not a MAX model.

“We are aware of media reports from Jakarta, and are closely monitoring the situation,” the US-based planemaker said in a statement.

“We are working to gather more information.”

Indonesia’s aviation sector has long suffered from a reputation for poor safety, and its airlines were once banned from entering US and European airspace.

In 2014, an AirAsia plane crashed with the loss of 162 lives.

Domestic investigators’ final report on the AirAsia crash showed a chronically faulty component in a rudder control system, poor maintenance and the pilots’ inadequate response were major factors in what was supposed to be a routine flight from the Indonesian city of Surabaya to Singapore.

A year later, in 2015, more than 140 people, including people on the ground, were killed when a military plane crashed shortly after takeoff in Medan on Sumatra island.

 

AFP

Seven Killed In South Sudan Plane Crash

South Sudan, officially known as the Republic of South Sudan, is a landlocked country in East-Central Africa.
South Sudan, officially known as the Republic of South Sudan, is a landlocked country in East-Central Africa.

 

Four passengers and three crew were killed Saturday when a cargo plane belonging to a local operator crashed near South Sudan’s capital Juba, the transport minister said.

The aircraft crashed shortly after its early morning takeoff in the Kameru neighbourhood around seven kilometres west of the city’s international airport.

“There were eight people on board, three passengers and five crew. A single person from among the passengers survived and she is in good health,” Transport Minister Madut Biar Yol told AFP.

“The four other passengers and the three crew members are dead.”

According to the minister, the crew members were Russian while the passengers were all South Sudanese.

The plane owned by local company South West Aviation had been carrying cash to the Wau region in the country’s northwest for Juba-based Opportunity Bank.

 

AFP

15 Killed As Plane Crashes In Kazakhstan

 

 

At least 15 people died and dozens were injured on Friday when a passenger plane carrying 100 people crashed shortly after takeoff from Kazakhstan’s largest city and slammed into a house, state media reported.

The Fokker 100 Bek Air plane disappeared from the radar minutes after it took off from Almaty airport at 7.05 am (01:05 GMT) on its way to the capital Nur-Sultan with 95 passengers and five crew members, the airport authority said in a statement.

It hit a concrete barrier and then slammed into a two-storey building. The reason for the crash, which took place near the city’s boundary northeast of the airport, was not immediately known.

A video released by the Central Asian country’s emergencies committee showed the plane split into pieces with its nose crushed into a partially collapsed house, as rescue crews worked to pull people from the wreckage.

Rescue workers could be seen reaching into the windows of the shattered cockpit, as scores of emergency staff rushed to the site.

The head of Almaty’s health service, Tleukhan Abildayev, said 14 people died at the scene while a young woman died later in hospital.

A total of 66 people were injured, of whom 50 were hospitalised, with 12 in an “extremely serious condition”, he said.

Nine children were among the injured.

Kazakhstan responded to the crash by grounding the model, which makes up the whole of the Bek Air fleet

No one was inside the house that the plane crashed into, Khabar state television reported.

– Those responsible ‘will be punished’ –

President Kassym-Jomart Tokayev pledged to provide families of the victims with compensation and tweeted that those responsible “will be severely punished in accordance with the law.”

Tokayev also said that a government commission had been set up to investigate the circumstances surrounding the tragedy.

The interior ministry said it had launched a criminal investigation into the incident over violations of air transport safety rules.

The plane was 23 years old and had passed safety checks in May, Kazakh authorities said.

The industry ministry said in a statement that the Fokker-100 model, which is no longer manufactured, would be grounded until the cause of the accident became clear.

Bek Air describes itself on its website as Kazakhstan’s first low-cost airline.

In March 2016, a Bek Air Fokker-100 plane with 116 passengers made an emergency landing at the capital’s international airport after its landing gear failed to deploy. None of the passengers or five-member crew were injured.

Swiss regional carrier Helvetic Airways phased out its Dutch-built Fokker-100s earlier this year after 15 years of service.

Informburo.kz news agency said one of its journalists, Dana Kruglova, was among the dead.

“(Her) trip had been uncertain, since she had work meetings planned in Almaty. But Dana wanted to celebrate the New Year with her parents in Nur-Sultan and decided to take this flight,” the news agency said.

AFP

Thai Airways Airbus 330 Skids Off Bangkok Runway, 14 Injured

An Airbus 330-300 operated by Thai Airways skidded off the runway at Bangkok’s main international airport after the nose wheel collapsed on landing late Sunday night, injuring 14 passengers, the airline said.

The flight from Guangzhou, China, was carrying 288 passengers and 14 crew members. Passengers were evacuated using emergency slides and the 14 injured were sent to a Bangkok hospital, Thai Airways said.

“Thai Airways International Flight TG 679 from Guangzhou was scheduled to arrive at Suvarnabhumi Airport at 23:00 hours local time. The nose gear failed as the plane touched the runway causing the plane to skid,” the airline said in an emailed statement.

“Sparks were noticed from the vicinity of the right landing gear near the engine; the matter is under investigation” by Thai civil aviation officials, it said.

Bangkok’s futuristic Suvarnabhumi airport opened seven years ago and has since become one of the busiest airports in Asia. Built to handle 45 million passengers a year, Suvarnabhumi Airport is already seeing 53 million passengers annually.

The airport is expanding a new passenger terminal and adding more parking bays and a new runway to enable it to handing 60 million fliers by 2017, according to the Airports of Thailand Public Company Ltd.