Record-Breaking USA Bury Canada, Reach Basketball World Cup Final

Team USA celebrate their win in the 2022 Women’s Basketball World Cup semi-final game between Canada and the USA in Sydney on September 30, 2022. (Photo by WILLIAM WEST / AFP)

 

Breanna Stewart drilled a game-high 17 points as clinical reigning champions the United States crushed Canada 83-43 in record-breaking fashion to make the women’s basketball World Cup final on Friday.

They opened with 15 unanswered points and never relented, extending their World Cup win streak to 29 games to set up a gold-medal showdown in Sydney against Australia or China, who play later.

Ever-dangerous Las Vegas Aces’ star A’ja Wilson added 15 points and 12 rebounds for the US as they zero in on a fourth straight title and 11th overall. Laeticia Amihere scored eight points to lead a deflated Canada.

It was the biggest winning margin in a World Cup semi-final with Canada’s tally the lowest in a last-four clash.

“I was really pleased with our team’s attention to detail on the scouting report as Canada has had a terrific tournament,” said USA coach Cheryl Reeve. “Canada’s a very good defensive team so that was a quality win for us.

“Our goal is to win a gold medal and we are in a position to do that,” she added.

The USA were always overwhelming favourites in their 10th consecutive World Cup semi-final, having never failed to reach the last four since the knockout stage was introduced in 1986.

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In contrast, world number four Canada had got this far just once before, in 1986, when they also crashed to the USA.

The Americans’ depth, defense and scoring talent was on full display.

They have killed it inside all tournament, sinking 55 points a game in the paint ahead of the semi-final, while punishing errors.

It was a similar scenario against Canada, who have taken big strides under coach Victor Lapena but struggled against the speed of their opponents.

“Congratulations USA, they played amazing from the beginning. When you play against USA in a semi-final, it’s clear you must be perfect or they are going to break the game in 10 or 15 minutes,” said Lapena.

“But I’m very happy to have this kind of experience for my players, especially the young players, to see what it means to play against such amazing players.”

The USA’s 15 straight points at the start gave them an immediate stranglehold and Canada never recovered, needing five minutes to get off the mark.

While the US shot 79 percent, Canada could only manage 11 percent as they fell 27-7 behind after the first quarter.

The margin only grew in the second frame to 45-21, with Seattle forward Stewart at the forefront.

They put on another 22 points in the third quarter to build a huge 38-point buffer going into the final stretch before cruising home.

AFP

At Least 10 Dead, 15 Wounded In Canada Stabbing Rampage

This handout conbination of photos released on September 4, 2022 by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Saskatchewan shows Damien Sanderson and Myles Sanderson, the two suspects in the stabbings in the Saskatchewan province in Canada. (Photo by Handout / Royal Canadian Mounted Police Saskatchewan / AFP)
This handout conbination of photos released on September 4, 2022 by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Saskatchewan shows Damien Sanderson and Myles Sanderson, the two suspects in the stabbings in the Saskatchewan province in Canada. (Photo by Handout / Royal Canadian Mounted Police Saskatchewan / AFP)

 

A stabbing spree in an Indigenous community and a nearby town in Canada’s Saskatchewan province left at least 10 people dead and 15 wounded on Sunday, police said, as they launched a manhunt for two suspects in one of the nation’s deadliest incidents of mass violence.

Police responding to emergency calls found 10 dead in the remote Indigenous community of James Smith Cree Nation and the nearby town of Weldon, Saskatchewan, Royal Canadian Mounted Police Assistant Commissioner Rhonda Blackmore told a news conference.

She said at least 15 other people had been wounded and transported to hospitals.

“It is horrific what has occurred in our province today,” she said. “We are actively looking for the two suspects.”

The alleged attackers fled in a vehicle and have been identified as Myles and Damien Sanderson, aged 30 and 31 respectively, both with black hair and brown eyes.

The James Smith Cree Nation, with a population of 2,500, declared a local state of emergency, while many residents of Saskatchewan province were urged to shelter in place.

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau called the attacks “horrific and heartbreaking” in a tweet, offering condolences and urging residents to heed authorities’ instructions.

Blackmore said authorities believe “some of the victims were targeted by the suspects and others were attacked randomly.”

“To speak to a motive would be extremely difficult at this point in time,” she added. No information was released about the victims.

Television images showed a few rural homes in fields of tall grass and trees, cordoned off with police tape, while on social media locals shared images of the attacks’ aftermath, such as the broken door handle to a burgled home.

Weldon resident Diane Shier told local media her neighbor, a man who lived with his grandson, was killed in the attack.

“I am very upset because I lost a good neighbor,” she told the Canadian Press news agency.

‘Maximum’ police resources

In recent years, Canada has witnessed a rampaging gunman masquerading as a policeman kill 16 people in Nova Scotia, another kill six and wound five worshippers at a Quebec City mosque, and a driver of a van mow down pedestrians in Toronto killing 10 and injuring 16.

“There are no words to adequately describe the pain and loss caused by this senseless violence,” said Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe after Sunday’s attack.

A “dangerous person” alert had been issued in the morning in Saskatchewan, as police responded to multiple stabbings in multiple locations in the Indigenous community and Weldon.

Police received a call at 5:40 am (11:40 GMT) about a stabbing at the James Smith Cree Nation, followed quickly by more calls reporting further stabbings, at a total of 13 separate locations, Blackmore said.

The callers identified the suspects, she said.

“Maximum” police resources were deployed for the search for the suspects, she said, but added that “their location and direction of travel is unknown.”

After reported sightings of the two men in Regina, the provincial capital that is more than 300 kilometers (185 miles) to the south, the alert and search expanded to include neighboring Manitoba and Alberta provinces — a vast region.

In Regina, police chief Evan Bray said authorities were on high alert with additional officers deployed as sports fans descended on the city for a sold-out Labour Day weekend match between the Canadian Football League’s Saskatchewan Roughriders and Winnipeg Blue Bombers.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority told AFP in a statement it had activated emergency protocols to deal with “a high number of critical patients.”

“We can confirm that multiple people are being triaged and cared for at multiple sites and that a call for additional staff to help respond to this situation has occurred,” it added.

Three helicopters were dispatched from Saskatoon and Regina to the remote northern communities to transport stabbing victims and bring a doctor to the scene.

 

AFP

Bad Leadership Has Seriously Damaged Nigeria, We Must Rescue Our Country – Peter Obi

 

Presidential Candidate of the Labour Party in the 2023 election, Peter Obi, is of the opinion that bad leadership has seriously damaged Nigeria.

The former Anambra State governor said it is time for Nigerians to rescue the country and put an end to bad governance.

Obi made these assertions on Sunday in Toronto, Canada, where he engaged Nigerians resident in Canada in an interactive townhall session regarding the future of Nigeria.

Speaking on his political drive for 2023 and what he and his team will do to transform the nation, Mr Obi said the vision and mission is to give full expression to “our democracy by moving our country from consumption to production”.


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In transforming the economy, the former governor disclosed that his party “intends to make it (the economy) more productive, thus creating employment and prosperity for millions of youths, reducing poverty in the land, and addressing issues of criminality and insecurity.

“We will aggressively pursue human capital development in the education and health sectors with available resources, while striving to adopt best global practices.

“We will have zero tolerance for corruption and will cut the cost of governance. Total commitment to transparency and accountability in government business is the only credible way to achieve limited to zero corruption.

“We will pursue intangible assets of good governance, rule of law, security of lives and properties, through an aggressive increase in personnel and equipment, and inclusive training of operatives in our security agencies.

“We will emphasize patriotism, national interest and national morale, quality of governance, political will, and character as complementary to others. We will ensure that we have these assets in place and stress asset optimization,” Obi explained.

Adding that his team intends to “lay special emphasis on critical infrastructures, especially Power, to ensure a clear measurable increase of today’s generation, transmission and distribution by 200% within the shortest possible time, through public-private partnership.

“We will aggressively pursue increased contribution of ICT to overall economic growth & national development.”

Furthermore, Mr Obi said  the Nigerian Diaspora represents a broad segment of Nigeria’s human development capital, noting that with that population, the diaspora family has the capacity to catapult any nation to greatness.

According to him, the Nigeria Diaspora has the capacity, and therefore must have a commensurate voice.

“By the 2027 elections, Nigeria Diaspora must have a voice via absentee ballots,” the LP’s flagbearer declared.

He was optimistic that under his leadership, Africa will remain the centrepiece of Nigeria’s foreign policy, stressing that his administration will improve Nigeria’s diplomatic sphere of influence via peacekeeping, trade, and investment initiatives.

World Cup: Falconets Overpower Canada, Maintain Perfect Group Record

Nigeria’s Falconets celebrate after defeating Canada in their last Group C game at the FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup on August 18, 2022. Credit: Twitter/@FIFAWWC

 

The Falconets overturned a goal deficit to thrash Canada 3-1 in their last Group C game at the FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup early Thursday.

A goalkeeping error had gifted the Canadians a second-minute lead via a Kaila Novak strike.

But it took Nigeria 22 minutes to go level. Esther Onyenezide finished from the spot, after a Canadian defender handled a goal-bound shot, to bring her team to par.

Coach Chris Danjuma’s side, who enjoyed much of the possession, continued pressing after the equaliser and were given another penalty with 32 minutes on the clock following a foul on Mercy Idoko. Again, Onyenezide rose up to the challenge and slotted in the Falconets’ second goal of the day and her third strike at the tournament.

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While the second half had a much more relaxed atmosphere, Nigeria could have sealed the game but failed to convert any of their chances. Coach Danjuma, who was barking orders from the technical area, then made three substitutions, including Chioma Olise, at a go with a few minutes left in normal time.

Her introduction paid off immediately. She connected neatly, inside the four minutes added minutes, to Rofiat Imuran’s low cross and beat the Canadian goalkeeper in her near post for the Falconets’ third goal.

The win means Nigeria finished top of the group having beaten France and South Korea by a lone goal each in their previous games. They also scored five goals and conceded one in the group stage. The team will play Group D runners-up The Netherlands in the quarter-finals Sunday.

France were the other team from the group that joined the West Africans in the last of the competition following a 1-0 win over South Korea who finished third with three points. Canada had no points and ended bottom of the group standings.

After The Apology, The ‘Healing’: Pope Visits Sacred Lake In Canada

Pope Francis participates in the Lac Ste. Anne Pilgrimage and Liturgy of the Word at Lac Ste. Anne, northwest of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, July 26, 2022. (Photo by Vincenzo PINTO / AFP)

 

 

Pope Francis called for “healing” Tuesday as he joined a pilgrimage to a sacred lake in Canada, one day after making a landmark apology for the abuse of Indigenous children at Catholic-run schools.

The 85-year-old pontiff prayed for the Church to choose “truth” over “defending the institution” as he visited Lac Ste Anne, some 80 kilometers (50 miles) west of Edmonton, where some of Canada’s Indigenous people began their relationship with Catholicism generations ago.

The lake is one of the most important pilgrimage sites in North America. Every year since the end of the 19th century, thousands of pilgrims mainly from Canada and the United States have come to bathe and pray in the healing waters, according to Indigenous rites.

Hundreds of faithful, many of them Indigenous, fell silent as the pope, who has been suffering with knee pain, was wheeled carefully to the water’s edge and prayed in silence there for several minutes.

He was then wheeled to a shrine, sprinkling some of those assembled with water he had blessed from the lake on the way, as Indigenous people drummed and chanted.

Lamenting the “terrible effects of colonization, the indelible pain of so many families, grandparents and children,” Francis told those gathered for a liturgical celebration that their presence was “testimony of resilience and a fresh start.”

“All of us, as (a) Church, now need healing: healing from the temptation of closing in on ourselves, of defending the institution rather than seeking the truth,” the pope continued.

Tuesday marked the second day of what Francis has called a “penitential” journey, a major tour of Canada which he began Monday with the long-awaited apology to a gathering of Indigenous people in the community of Maskwacis, south of Edmonton.

From the late 1800s to the 1990s, Canada’s government sent about 150,000 children into 139 residential schools run by the Church, where they were cut off from their families, language and culture.

Many were physically and sexually abused, and thousands are believed to have died of disease, malnutrition or neglect.

 

Pope Francis gives the Liturgy of the Word at the Shrine as he participates in Lac Ste. Anne Pilgrimage at Lac Ste. Anne, northwest of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, July 26, 2022. (Photo by Vincenzo PINTO / AFP)

 

– ‘Part of a process’ –
For some, the healing had already begun.

Cindy Dearhead, a First Nations woman who was a student in one of the infamous schools, said she felt the pope’s apology was “important.”

“It was a long time coming, but finally a pope himself is finally acknowledging yes, I’m sorry,” she told AFP at Lac Ste Anne.

“For those of us that suffered into generations of trauma, maybe we can have healing and can understand what our parents came through and maybe feel better.”

But for many others that healing may well depend on what comes next.

“I think the apology has always been one thing, part of a process of reconciliation. To me, the actions that need to come behind it are very important,” said Chief Peter Powder of the Mikisew Cree First Nations.

At Lac Ste Anne, the leader of the world’s 1.3 billion Catholics appeared tired and weakened by knee pain that has seen him use a wheelchair often in recent months.

His pilgrimage came hours after he delivered a mass to tens of thousands of people thronging a stadium in Edmonton, the capital of Alberta, one of the largest open-air events of his visit.

There he prayed for a “future in which the history of violence and marginalization suffered by our Indigenous brothers and sisters is never repeated.”

At both events traditional music filled the air, while Indigenous people in the crowd were recognizable by their orange shirts — intended to symbolize what they endured in the country’s infamous residential schools.

Francis greeted the crowds both times — in his wheelchair at the lake, and in the popemobile at the stadium — kissing babies and blessing children.

 

LAC STE. ANNE, AB – JULY 26: Pope Francis reads along at the Ste. Anne Shrine after making the pilgrimage to the lake on July 26, 2022 in Lac Ste. Anne, Canada. (Photo by Cole Burston / GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA / Getty Images via AFP)

 

– Generational trauma –
Since May 2021, more than 1,300 unmarked graves have been discovered at the sites of the former schools, sending shockwaves through Canada — which has slowly begun to acknowledge this long, dark chapter in its history.

More than 4,000 children have been identified as dying in the schools, but the true toll is estimated to be at least 6,000.

The abuse created trauma for generations.

On Wednesday the pope will fly to Quebec City, before ending his trip on Friday in Iqaluit, capital of the northern territory of Nunavut and home to the largest Inuit population in Canada.

There he will meet again with former residential school students, before returning to Italy.

Pope To Hold Mass In Canada After Apology For Indigenous Abuse

This handout picture taken and released on July 25, 2022 by the Vatican press office shows Pope Francis (L) wearing a headdress presented to him by Indigenous leaders at Muskwa Park in Maskwacis, south of Edmonton, western Canada, on July 25, 2022. (Photo by Handout / VATICAN MEDIA / AFP)  /

 

 

Tens of thousands of people are expected to attend a mass by Pope Francis in western Canada Tuesday, a day after his historic apology for the abuse of Indigenous children at Catholic-run schools.

The 85-year-old pontiff is expected to deliver a homily in Spanish at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta, in what will be one of the largest open-air events of his visit to Canada.

Knee pain has seen the Pope use a cane or a wheelchair in recent months, including in Canada, and he will greet crowds from his popemobile.

In his first address Monday, to a gathering of Indigenous people in the community of Maskwacis, south of Edmonton, he offered a long-awaited apology to Canada’s First Nations, Metis and Inuit people for the “evil” done over decades of abuse in schools.

“I am sorry,” he said, adding: “I humbly beg forgiveness for the evil committed by so many Christians against the Indigenous peoples.”

He cited the “cultural destruction” and the “physical, verbal, psychological and spiritual abuse” of children over nearly a century at the schools.

From the late 1800s to the 1990s, Canada’s government sent about 150,000 children into 139 residential schools run by the Church, where they were cut off from their families, language and culture.

Many were physically and sexually abused, and thousands are believed to have died of disease, malnutrition or neglect.

Organizers say more than 60,000 people are expected to attend the mass in Edmonton, which is being held under heavy security.

The spiritual leader of the world’s 1.3 billion Catholics is then expected to continue what he has described as a “penitential” journey, travelling in the afternoon to Lac Ste Anne, some 80 kilometers (50 miles) west of Edmonton, for a liturgical celebration at one of North America’s most important pilgrimage sites.

Every year since the end of the 19th century, thousands of pilgrims mainly from Canada and the United States have come to bathe and pray in the healing waters, according to Indigenous rites.

Tuesday also marks the feast of St. Anne, mother of the Virgin Mary and grandmother of Jesus in the Catholic tradition, a major figure for many Canadian Aboriginal communities.

– ‘Path together’ –
Monday’s apology had a powerful impact on many, leaving survivors feeling overwhelmed and leaders praising it as historic, even as some warned it was only a first step.

“I believe there’s a path together. There’s a lot of work to be done,” said George Arcand, grand chief of the Confederacy of Treaty Six First Nations.

Since May 2021, more than 1,300 unmarked graves have been discovered at the sites of the former schools, sending shockwaves throughout Canada — which has slowly begun to acknowledge this long, dark chapter in its history.

More than 4,000 children have been identified as dying in the schools, but the true toll is estimated to be at least 6,000.

The abuse created trauma for generations.

Following a July 27-29 visit to Quebec City, Pope Francis will end his trip in Iqaluit, capital of the northern territory of Nunavut and home to the largest Inuit population in Canada, where he will meet again with former residential school students, before returning to Italy.

Pope Apologizes For ‘Evil’ Of Indigenous Abuse In Canada

MASKWACIS, AB – JULY 25: Pope Francis gives remarks as he makes an apology for the treatment of First Nations children’s in Canada’s Residential School system, during his visit on July 25, 2022 in Maskwacis, Canada. Cole Burston/Getty Images/AFP

 

Pope Francis on Monday apologized for the “evil” inflicted on the Indigenous peoples of Canada on the first day of a visit focused on addressing decades of abuse at Catholic-run residential schools.

The plea for forgiveness from the leader of the world’s 1.3 billion Catholics was met with applause by a crowd of First Nations, Metis and Inuit people in Maskwacis, in western Alberta province — some of whom were taken from their families as children in what has been branded a “cultural genocide.”

“I am sorry,” said the 85-year-old pontiff, who remained seated as he delivered his address at the site of one of the largest of Canada’s infamous residential schools — where some 150,000 Indigenous children were sent as part of a policy of forced assimilation.

“I humbly beg forgiveness for the evil committed by so many Christians against the Indigenous peoples,” said the pope, citing “cultural destruction” and the “physical, verbal, psychological and spiritual abuse” of children over the course of decades.

Francis spoke of his “deep sense of pain and remorse” as he formally acknowledged that “many members of the Church” had cooperated in the abusive system.

As he spoke the emotion was palpable in Maskwacis, an Indigenous community south of provincial capital Edmonton that was the site of the Ermineskin residential school until it closed in 1975.

Several hundred people, many in traditional clothing, were in attendance, along with Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Mary Simon, the country’s first Indigenous governor general.

Many lowered their eyes, wiped away tears or leaned on and hugged neighbors, and Indigenous leaders afterwards placed a traditional feathered headdress on the pope.

Counsellors were waiting near teepees set up to provide support to those who may need it, and earlier volunteers had distributed small paper bags for the “collection of tears.”

– ‘Cry love’ –

“The First Nation believes that if you cry, you cry love, you catch the tears on a piece of paper and put it back in this bag,” explained Andre Carrier of the Manitoba Metis Federation, before the pope spoke.

Volunteers will collect the bags and later they will be burned with a special prayer, “to return the tears of love to the creator,” he said.

From the late 1800s to the 1990s, Canada’s government sent about 150,000 children into 139 residential schools run by the Church, where they were cut off from their families, language and culture.

Many were physically and sexually abused by headmasters and teachers, and thousands are believed to have died of disease, malnutrition or neglect.

During a ceremony performed before the pope spoke in Maskwacis, Indigenous people carried a bright red 50-meter long banner on which the names — or sometimes only the nicknames — of all the children known to have died were written in white. There were 4,120 of them, officials said.

Since May 2021, more than 1,300 unmarked graves have been discovered at the sites of the former schools, sending shockwaves throughout Canada — which has slowly begun to acknowledge this long, dark chapter in its history.

A delegation of Indigenous peoples traveled to the Vatican in April and met the pope — a precursor to Francis’ trip — after which he formally apologized.

But doing so again on Canadian soil was of huge significance to survivors and their families.

Later in the day, at 4:30 pm (2230 GMT) Francis will travel to the Sacred Heart Catholic Church of the First Peoples in Edmonton, one of the city’s oldest churches, for a second speech to Indigenous communities.

– ‘Healing journey’ –

The flight to Edmonton was the longest since 2019 for Francis, who has been suffering from knee pain and was forced to use a wheelchair on the Canada trip.

The papal visit, though highly anticipated, is also a source of controversy for some.

“It means a lot to me” that he came, said Deborah Greyeyes, 71, a member of the Muskeg Lake Cree Nation, the largest Indigenous group in Canada.

“I think we have to forgive, too, at some point,” she told AFP. But “a lot of stuff was taken away from us.”

After a mass before tens of thousands of faithful in Edmonton on Tuesday, Francis will head northwest to an important pilgrimage site, the Lac Sainte Anne.

Following a July 27-29 visit to Quebec City, he will end his trip in Iqaluit, capital of the northern territory of Nunavut and home to the largest Inuit population in Canada, where he will meet again with former residential school students, before returning to Italy.

AFP

Pope Heads To Canada To Make Amends For Indigenous School Abuse

Pope Francis boards his plane from a lift designed for the boarding and off boarding of reduced mobility passengers, on July 24, 2022 at Rome’s Fiumicino airport, as he departs for a trip to Canada. – Pope Francis heads to Canada on Juley 24, 2022. (Photo by Tiziana FABI / AFP)

 

Pope Francis was headed to Canada Sunday for a chance to personally apologise to Indigenous survivors of abuse committed over a span of decades at residential schools run by the Catholic Church.

The head of the world’s 1.3 billion Catholics will be met at Edmonton’s international airport by Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at 11:20 am (1720 GMT).

Francis’ Canada visit is primarily to apologize to survivors for the Church’s role in the scandal that a national truth and reconciliation commission has called “cultural genocide”.

Before he left Rome earlier Sunday, the pope said on Twitter he was making a “penitential pilgrimage” that “might contribute to the journey of reconciliation already undertaken”.

He will be joined on the visit by his diplomacy chief, Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican’s second most senior official.

From the late 1800s to the 1990s, Canada’s government sent about 150,000 First Nations, Metis and Inuit children into 139 residential schools run by the Church, where they were cut off from their families, language and culture.

Many were physically and sexually abused by headmasters and teachers.

Thousands of children are believed to have died of disease, malnutrition or neglect.

Since May 2021, more than 1,300 unmarked graves have been discovered at the sites of the former schools.

A delegation of Indigenous peoples travelled to the Vatican in April and met the pope — a precursor to Francis’ six-day trip — after which he formally apologized.

But doing so again on Canadian soil will be of huge significance for survivors and their families, for whom the land of their ancestors is of particular importance.

The 10-hour flight constitutes the longest since 2019 for the 85-year-old pope, who has been suffering from knee pain that has forced him to use a cane or wheelchair in recent outings.

The pope was in a wheelchair Sunday and used a lifting platform to board the plane, an AFP correspondent accompanying him said.

– ‘Too late’ –

After resting Sunday, the pope will travel Monday to the community of Maskwacis, some 100 kilometres (62 miles) south of Edmonton, and address an estimated crowd of 15,000 expected to include former students from across the country.

“I would like a lot of people to come,” said Charlotte Roan, 44, interviewed by AFP in June. The member of the Ermineskin Cree Nation said she wanted people to come “to hear that it wasn’t made up”.

Others see the pope’s visit as too little too late, including Linda McGilvery with the Saddle Lake Cree Nation near Saint Paul, about 200 kilometres east of Edmonton.

“I wouldn’t go out of my way to see him,” said the 68-year-old.

“For me it’s kind of too late, because a lot of the people suffered, and the priests and the nuns have now passed on.”

McGilvery spent eight years of her childhood in one of the schools, from age six to 13.

“Being in the residential school I lost a lot of my culture, my ancestry. That’s many years of loss,” she told AFP.

After a mass before tens of thousands of faithful in Edmonton on Tuesday, Francis will head northwest to an important pilgrimage site, the Lac Sainte Anne.

Following a July 27-29 visit to Quebec City, he will end his trip in Iqaluit, capital of the northern territory of Nunavut and home to the largest Inuit population in Canada.

There he will meet with former residential school students, before returning to Italy.

In total, Francis is expected to deliver four speeches and four homilies, all in Spanish.

Francis is the second pope to visit Canada, after John Paul II, who visited three times (1984, 1987 and 2002).

AFP

Canada Considers Extending Timeline For Oil Industry Emission Targets

(FILES) In this file photo taken on February 21, 2022 Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau speaks during a news conference in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Dave Chan / AFP)

 

 

 

Canada, the world’s fourth-largest oil producer, is considering pushing back its greenhouse gas reduction timeline for its oil industry, the environment minister told media on Saturday.

The government recognizes that “some of the measures that will be needed to achieve those deep emission reductions might require more time than what we have between now and 2030,” observed Canadian Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault in an interview with CBC’s “The House.”

“There’s a possibility that if the industry needs a bit more time, then we can provide some flexibility while ensuring that Canada still meets its 2030 goals,” Guilbeault said.

Last year Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government announced an enhanced plan to comply with the Paris Climate Agreement, aiming for a 40-45 percent reduction in its greenhouse gas emissions by 2030 from 2005 levels.

The oil and gas industry, which makes up for more than a quarter of the country’s carbon emissions, is critical to achieving this goal, an interim target on the road to achieving carbon neutrality by 2050.

According to Guilbeault, Ottawa is willing to “allow the industry a bit more time if they need this time to deploy the necessary infrastructure that they need to reduce emissions.”

He did not specify how Ottawa planned to meet its 2030 international commitments if the oil and gas sector was allowed to push back its reduction targets.

Canada has never before met its previous greenhouse gas reduction targets.

The Pathways Alliance, a coalition of six Canadian oil producers, plans to reduce its CO2 emissions by 22 megatonnes by 2030, compared to a federal government target of 110 megatonnes, out of a total of 191 megatonnes emitted in 2019, according to CBC.

Putin Accuses Canada Of Delaying Gas Turbine For Own Gain

Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a meeting with Saint Petersburg governor at the Kremlin in Moscow on March 1, 2022. Alexey NIKOLSKY / SPUTNIK / AFP

 

Russian President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday accused Canada of delaying the return of a turbine for the Nord Stream pipeline, saying Ottawa was eyeing the European market itself.

Russia’s state-owned energy giant Gazprom has reduced flows to Germany via Nord Stream 1 by some 60 percent in recent weeks, blaming the absence of a Siemens gas turbine that was undergoing repairs in Canada.

The repaired turbine is currently understood to be en route to Russia, as routine maintenance work that completely halted deliveries via Nord Stream 1 is due to be completed on Thursday.

Moscow says the turbine is essential for the proper functioning of the Nord Stream pipeline, which delivers gas to Germany via the Baltic Sea.

“One machine needs planned repairs, it is not given back from Canada because sanctions have been placed against Gazprom, although it is a Siemens plant,” Putin said at a televised meeting in Moscow.

“I’ll tell you why Canada did it: because it produces oil and gas itself and plans to enter the European market.”

The Nord Stream 1 pipeline has been shut down since July 11 for 10 days to undergo annual maintenance.

Data from management company Gascade on Wednesday showed that gas was expected to begin flowing through the pipeline again on Thursday, although it remained to be seen how much would be delivered.

EU countries have hit Moscow with a barrage of sanctions for its military offensive in Ukraine.

Germany said on Wednesday said Russia was using the absence of the turbine as an “excuse” to limit gas deliveries.

Canada Inflation Soars To Four-Decade High

(FILES) In this file photo taken on April 11, 2020 the Jacques-Cartier bridge in Montreal is seen on April 11, 2020.  (Photo by Eric THOMAS / AFP)

 

Canada’s rate of inflation continued to soar in June, hitting a four-decade high of 8.1 percent as sky-scraping gasoline led a broad increase in prices, the government statistical agency said Wednesday.

Analysts had been expecting worse, after a 7.7 percent jump in prices the previous month, while the data suggested inflation — at its highest level since January 1983 — may have peaked.

“Inflation continues to heat up, but not to temperatures analysts had expected,” Desjardins analyst Royce Mendes said in a research note.

This slightly weaker-than-anticipated reading “will come as good news for central bankers trying to control price pressures,” he added.

According to Statistics Canada, the cost to fill up cars and trucks went up 54.6 percent in the 12 months to June.

But in recent weeks, record gasoline prices have come down as crude oil tumbled.

The cost of purchasing a passenger vehicle in the month also rose, with demand outpacing supply as a result of the ongoing semiconductor chip shortage.

The lifting of most pandemic restrictions has also fueled an increase in tourism, with the return of sporting events, festivals and other large in-person gatherings leading to higher demand — and costs — for airfare, hotel rooms and restaurant meals.

Meanwhile, the costs of childcare, computer equipment and mortgage interest fell.

A red-hot housing market also cooled slightly, leading to lower real estate commissions.

AFP

Canada And Costa Rica Qualify For 2023 Women’s World Cup

(FILES) In this file photo taken on April 12, 2022 Spain’s midfielder Alexia Putellas warms up prior to the 2023 Women’s World Cup Group B qualification football match between Scotland and Spain at Hampden Park in Glasgow, Scotland. (Photo by ANDY BUCHANAN / AFP)

 

 

Canada and Costa Rica qualified for the 2023 Women’s World Cup on Friday after winning group stage matches at the CONCACAF W tournament.

Julia Grosso scored in the 64th minute to give Canada, the reigning Olympic champion, a 1-0 victory over Panama while Cristin Granados netted two first-half goals in Costa Rica’s 4-0 victory over Trinidad and Tobago.

Both Costa Rica and Canada improved to 2-0 in their group to clinch berths in Thursday’s semi-finals of the eight-team North American regional tournament and secure trips to Australia and New Zealand for next year’s global women’s football showdown.

Two-time defending Women’s World Cup champion United States has already secured a chance to claim a third straight trophy by reaching the CONCACAF semi-finals.

Either Haiti or Jamaica will take the last available Women’s World Cup berth depending on the outcome of their Monday group-stage match.

Third-place teams from each group advance to next February’s global playoff for three Women’s World Cup spots.

The CONCACAF event serves as the regional qualifier for the 2024 Paris Olympics as well. The CONCACAF champions will secure a Paris 2024 Olympic berth. The runner-up and third-place teams will meet in a playoff next year to determine another spot in that tournament.

Granados scored in the 18th and 45th minutes for Costa Rica while Trinidad and Tobago’s Lauryn Hutchinson netted an own goal in the 33rd and Katherine Alvarado added a final goal for Las Ticas in the 48th.