House Of Representatives Wades Into WAEC Debt Crisis

waec-WASSCE-2015The Nigerian House of Representatives has set up an Ad hoc Committee to intervene in the alleged debt crisis between the West African Examination‎ Council (WAEC) and some states, resulting to a threat by the examination body to withhold the results of some students.

The House took the decision following a motion by a lawmaker, Linus Okorie that the academic pursuit of more than half of the 1.2 million candidates who sat for the examination would be disrupted if WAEC was allowed to carry out its threat.

The motion was passed unanimously after deliberations, and the House mandated the Committee to report back in one week, to allow actions be taken before the date for the release of the May/June 2015 West African Secondary Schools Certificate Examination (WASSCE) results.

On Monday, the examination body claimed that 19 states out of the 36 states were owing about four billion Naira exam entry fees for state government sponsored candidates.

The Head of WAEC in Nigeria, Charles Eguridu, said: “A total number of 19 states in the country owe the Council in respect of entry fees for state government sponsored candidates for the May/June 2015 WASSCE. Some states also still owe the Council registration fees for the May/June 2014 WASSCE.

“We, therefore, want to publicly plead with the affected states to off-set the registration fees of their candidates as soon as possible, as we cannot guarantee that the results of their candidates for the May/June 2015 will be released along with others”.

2015 WASSCE: WAEC Decries Mass Failure, Threatens To Withhold Results

waec wassceLess than 45 per cent of those who sat for the 2015 West African Senior School Certificate Exams (WASSCE) passed with credit grade and above, a trend that would seem to have continued from 2013.

The poor performance has been put down to a lack of preparation and teaching facilities, and an inadequate number of quality teachers.

To defeat the menace and also curb examination malpractice, the Head of the West African Examination Council (WAEC) national office in Nigeria, Charles Eguridu, said proper technology had been deployed.

Meanwhile, the examination body said that 19 states out of the 36 states of the federation are owing about four billion Naira exam entry fees for State government sponsored candidates in the May/June 2014 and 2015 WASSCE.

Speaking to Channels Television after addressing a press conference, Mr Eguridu maintained that the body was cash-trapped and was struggling with meeting its financial obligations.

He also noted that the Council may delay the release‎ of results of government sponsored candidates when the council announces the May/June 2015 WASSCE results.

He said: “A total number of 19 states in the country owe the Council in respect of entry fees for state government sponsored candidates for the May/June 2015 WASSCE. Some states also still owe the Council registration fees for the May/June 2014 WASSCE.

“We have written to the affected State governments without any response. The poor response of the ‘debtor states’ is threatening the smooth operations of the Council.

“We therefore want to publicly plead with the affected states to off-set the registration fees of their candidates as soon as possible, as we cannot guarantee that the results of their candidates for the May/June 2015 will be released along with others”.

WAEC Official Says No Mass Failure But Decline In Performance

WAECThe Head of National Office, West African Examination Council (WAEC), Charles Eguridu, has said that the results of the May/June 2014 WAEC examination only indicates a decline in performance and not a mass failure as reported by the media.

Speaking as a guest on Channels Television’s breakfast programme, ‘Sunrise Daily’, Mr Eguridu noted that Nigeria does not have a uniform standard for the secondary school education, compared to other countries and therefore, judging success based on English and Mathematics was unfair.

He stated that the government had redesigned the curriculum which envisages that “not every child that goes into primary school will end up in university profession” adding that about 39 new subjects have been added to the curriculum, like GSM Repairs, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning amongst others.

Mr. Eguridu mentioned that it amounted to a misnomer for students to focus on passing English and Mathematics, leaving other subjects. He said that this was affecting the standard of education in the country.

He further noted that there were certain peculiar subjects in other member countries, different to Nigeria’s core subjects. Comparing Ghana to Nigeria, he said that Ghana’s core subjects were Integrated Science, Social Studies, English Language and Mathematics, while Nigeria’s core subjects are only English and Mathematics.

He maintained that the inability of a student to pass either of the subjects should not be seen as failure because these subjects do not determine success in some careers.

Mr. Eguridu also explained how WAEC develops its assessment of students. He noted that WAEC assesses students by the quality of teaching and learning that have taken place through questions developed by practitioners in the school system. “WAEC is to conduct exams in public interest, which is determined by the government”

He explained that a pool of examiners from WAEC member countries come together to develop the papers which are later given to candidates who are likely to write the exam – students in SS3.

“When an exam is too simple it is isolated, when an exam is too difficult it is isolated, so we have to be on an average level”, he added.

 

 

Candidates Record Poor Performance In 2014 May/June WAEC

waecThe West African Examination Council (WAEC) has recorded another decline in the performance of Candidates in the May/June West African Senior Secondary School Certificate Examinations.

Announcing the release of the results in Lagos today, the Chief Executive and Head of National office of the Council, Mr Charles Eguridu said only 31.28% ‎of over 1.7 million candidates that sat for the examination had credits in 5 subjects including maths and English compared to the 36.57% in 2013 and 38.81% in 2012.

He attributed the decline to the diminishing interest of students in their academic ‎activities and studies.

The Council also announced ‎the introduction of the Candidates Identity Verification, Attendance, Malpractice and Post- Examinations Management System, to enable supervisors and staff of the council to address and record the processes in real time and WAEC Customised Calculators to check exam malpractices.

Candidates who sat the May/June 2014 exams will be able to check details of their performance on the council’s result website www.waecdirect.org by the August 13.

Results of 145,795 candidates are withheld because of examination malpractice and the cases are currently being investigated.

Analyst Blames Federal And State Governments Over Missing Chibok Girls

vlcsnap-2014-05-05-14h44m09s235A public affairs analyst, Mr Sola Ojewusi, has blamed the federal and state governments over the kidnap of over two hundred school girls in Chibok, Borno State.

Speaking as a guest on Sunrise Daily, Channels Television’s breakfast programme on Monday, Ojewusi blamed the lack of synergy between the governments and the West African Examination Council (WAEC).

Reacting to a comment credited to the Head of WAEC’s National Office in Nigeria, Charles Eguridu, Ojewusi said “there seems to be a disconnect right from all forces that should have given the security needed to this kind of people involved.

“There is kind of a slow approach from the state and federal governments and from all the people that should have acted”.

He called for an investigation into the allegation made by Eguridu that the WAEC had recommended the relocation of the students from Chibok to Uba Local Government Area in Borno state.

He urged the federal government to create a better way of communication with the state governor and vice versa because “the president is in Abuja” and those on ground “may have more information than the presidency” noting that “you don’t expect the president to be everywhere”. He however was quick to add that the “buck stops at his desk”.

“But you have to help the president to do the things that you have asked him to do” he said.

He further noted that the Boko Haram issue is a Nigerian problem and not a regional problem citing the concerns the federal government had when the Niger Delta militants were attacking oil installations and kidnapping expatriates working for oil and construction companies.

He called on northern elders to call the radical Islamist sect to order the way “leaders in the south west went to meet this people (Odua People’s Congress) and told them we know you are trying to do something to be able to be a voice for the people of the South West but there are certain actions you are taking that is going to affect the interest of not only the south west but Nigeria” .