We Need A Re-orientation Of Nigeria’s Education Sector, Says Professor

A Professor of Philosophy, Godwin Sogolo, has said that the education sector in Nigeria needs a re-orientation.

According to him, many of the courses taught in Nigerian institutions only equip students with technical skills but lack the moral education that is required for the society to thrive.

Mr Sogolo said this during an interview on Channels TV’s Sunrise Daily.

Read Also: International Youth Day: Gbajabiamila Seeks Transformation Of Educational System

He believes more attention should be paid to such courses in order to help in developing the minds and characters of young graduates.

“We need an orientation in education, the education that merely impacts skills and techniques into students and then they graduate with these techniques, it’s not sufficient.

“Today, the rush is for courses that have technical skills such as technology, medicine, law and journalism. But there are disciplines like philosophy, moral education that are made to train the human mind,” he said.

“There needs to be a reorientation…how many students study philosophy in this country.

“The University of Ibadan, which is the premiere university was established in 1948 and it did not start the teaching of philosophy until 1973.

“In most of the north until recently, there was no university in the northern part of this country had a philosophy department.

“This is the kind of thing I’m trying to say.

“Think about those disciplines that humanise and teach the individual the art of being human, it is important because no matter what skills you have, until you begin to behave like a human, you are not a human and so, society cannot survive without that aspect of education”.

International Youth Day: Gbajabiamila Seeks Transformation Of Educational System

 

The Speaker of the House of Representatives Rt. Hon. Femi Gbajabiamila has urged governments at all levels to fashion out ways of transforming the Nigerian educational system to strengthen the capacity of the youth.

In a statement by his Special Adviser on Media and Publicity, Lanre Lasisi, in which he was commemorating the International Youth Day, the Speaker noted that the government has the primary responsibility of ensuring that every Nigerian is given access to basic and qualitative education.

According to him, the essence of education is to proffer solutions to challenges confronting humanity.

The Speaker further stated that democracy and good governance would thrive in an atmosphere where a sizeable proportion of the populace is educated and well enlightened about their civic responsibilities.

While assuring that the 9th House of Representatives under his leadership would prioritise issues concerning the education sector, Rt. Hon. Gbajabiamila emphasized that revamping the sector has become imperative.

The Speaker had in 2016 during his tenure as the House Majority Leader sponsored a bill to provide access to higher education for Nigerians through interest-free loans.

The Bill, which has been reintroduced in this Assembly and has gone through its first reading, proposes a Nigeria Education Bank, which will be established by law to provide education for all Nigerians without any discrimination.

He said: “As we celebrate the International Youth Day, I intend to use the office of the Speaker and the instrumentality of the law to fast-track the passage of this and others Bills that are capable of restoring hope to our youth to reposition them for the tasks of nation-building and global competitiveness.

“It is indisputable that the global economy is knowledge-driven, while the private sector has continued to play a leading and pivotal role in the economic development of states and nations.

“This is why we need to transform the Nigerian Educational System and why the youth should be encouraged to broaden their skills,” the Speaker said.
Rt. Hon. Gbajabiamila added, “I wish all Nigerian youths a happy International Youth Day”.

Technical And Vocational Education, ‘Remedy’ To Unemployment – Ganduje

 

Kano State Governor, Abdullahi Ganduje, believes acquiring entrepreneurship skills will go a long way to address unemployment in the country.

He made the remark at the 17th Combined Convocation ceremony of the Federal Polytechnic Ado-Ekiti held on Saturday in Ekiti State.

Governor Ganduje spoke shortly after he was honoured at the event with an Award of Fellowship of the institution.

“With rising trends in unemployment predicaments in our society for both skilled and unskilled individuals, technical and vocational education provides the necessary remedy to this disturbing scenario of unemployability of graduates of tertiary institutions,” he was quoted as saying in a statement by his Chief Press Secretary, Abba Anwar.

READ ALSO: Hackers Failed In Attempt To Gain Access Into Osinbajo’s Twitter Account – Aide

The governor, therefore, urged polytechnics across the country to continue providing the leading steps towards entrepreneurship education for self-employment and job creation.

He highlighted some of the successes recorded by his administration in primary and post-primary education.

“For example, in our eight tertiary institutions of learning, we have over 279 programmes that are accredited by agencies responsible for such exercise.

“For instance, Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, has 27 programmes; Yusuf Maitama Sule University, Kano has 32 programmes and Kano Polytechnic has 72 programmes,” Governor Ganduje added.

Others according to him are Audu Bako College of Agriculture, Dambatta – 27; Kano State College of Education and Preliminary Studies – 15 programmes; College of Arts and Remedial Studies, Tudun Wada has – 18; Aminu Kano College of Islamic and Legal Studies – 10 programmes; and Sa’Adatu Rimi College of Education, Kumbotso – 78, all accredited programmes.

In their remarks, the Chairman of the Governing Council and the Rector of the polytechnic, Austin Edeze and Dr Dayo Oladebeye, commended the governor for his commitment to the development of education in Kano.

They recalled the Governor Ganduje was a one-time Chairman of the institution’s Governing Council, saying the polytechnic witnessed tremendous academic excellence during his time.

Ganduje was accompanied by the Rector of Kano State Polytechnic, Professor Mukhtar Kurawa; and the Vice-Chancellor of the Kano University of Science and Technology, Wudil, Professor Shehu Musa.

Others are the Provost of Kano College of Education and Preliminary Studies, Dr Sunusi Ahmad, and the Provost of Sa’adatu Rimi College of Education, Kumbotso, Dr Yahaya Isah Bunkure.

Crime Against Humanity? SERAP Asks ICC To Investigate Problem Of Out-Of-School Children

SERAP Threatens To Sue UI, AAUA Over Increased Fees

 

The Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP) has asked the International Criminal Court (ICC), to investigate the problem of millions of out-of-school children in Nigeria.

It also asked the ICC to determine whether or not the “failure of the Nigerian authorities over the years to address it”, amounts to violence against children and crimes against humanity.

In a petition dated July 19, and signed by SERAP’s Deputy Director, Kolawole Oluwadare, the organisation says “investigating and prosecuting high-ranking Nigerian officials and providing reparations to victims will contribute to serving the best interests of Nigerian children, and are, therefore, complicit in the crime to be tried by the ICC”.

The organisation also wants the ICC to bring to justice, those suspected to be responsible for the widespread and systematic problem of out-of-school children in Nigeria.

Read the full statement below.

SERAP drags senior Nigerian officials to ICC ‘for leaving 13.2 million children out of school’
 
Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP) has sent a petition to Mrs. Fatou Bensouda, Prosecutor, International Criminal Court (ICC), urging her to use her “good offices to investigate whether the problem of out-of-school children in Nigeria, and the failure of the Nigerian authorities over the years to address it amount to violence against children and crimes against humanity within the jurisdiction of the ICC.”
 
The organization urged Mrs Bensouda to: “push for those suspected to be responsible for this problem, including current and former presidents and state governors since 1999, who directly or indirectly have individually and/or collectively breached their special duty toward children, and are therefore complicit in the crime, to be tried by the ICC.”
 
In the petition dated 19 July 2019 and signed by SERAP deputy director Kolawole Oluwadare, the organization said: “Investigating and prosecuting high-ranking Nigerian officials and providing reparations to victims will contribute to serving the best interests of Nigerian children, the most vulnerable citizens in our country, and ending the impunity that is denying them their right to education and a life free of violence and fear.”
 
SERAP said: “These out-of-school Nigerian children have been exposed to real danger, violence and even untimely death. Senior Nigerian politicians since 1999 have failed to understand the seriousness of the crime of leaving millions of children out of school, and have made an essential contribution to the commission of the crime.”
 
SERAP also said: “The ICC has stated in the Lubanga case that the interruption, delay and denial of the right of children to education is a crime within the jurisdiction of the Court. SERAP believes that the reality for children living in the Ituri region of the Democratic Republic of the Congo is similar to the reality faced by millions of out-of-school children in Nigeria, as the situation is depriving an entire generation of children of their right to education and human dignity.”
 
The petition read in part: “There is no immunity for crimes under the Rome Statute. The crime of leaving millions of Nigerian children out of school is an opportunity for your Office to show the Court’s commitment to effectively enforce its Policy on Children and other important statements of international criminal justice.”
 
“Putting millions of Nigerian children that should be in school on the street exposes them to violence, including sexual violence, gender violence, abduction, and other forms of exploitation and violence against children, and implicitly amounts to enslavement, trafficking of children, and ill-treatment, three of the eleven acts that may amount to a crime against humanity under the Rome Statute.”
 
Unless the ICC declares the problem of over 13 million out-of-school Nigerian children as violence against children and crime against humanity, and hold those suspected to be responsible since 1999 to account, the number of out-of-school children will continue to rise, and these children may never receive any formal education at all.”
 
Nigeria is a state party to the Rome Statute and deposited its instrument of ratification on 27 September 2001. According to Nigeria’s Universal Basic Education Commission (UBEC), the population of out-of-school children in Nigeria has risen from 10.5 million to 13.2 million.
 
“This figure is based on a joint survey conducted in 2015 by the United Nations Children Fund (UNICEF) and the Nigerian government. Data by the UNICEF also shows that one in every five of the world’s out-of-school children is in Nigeria. However, Nigeria’s former Minister of Education Mr Adamu Adamu has suggested the figure of out-of-school children in Nigeria to be 10,193,918, citing a recent ‘National Personnel Audit’ of both public and private schools in the country.”
 
According to the former Minister of Education, all of the 36 states in Nigeria are affected by the problem of out-of-school children but the problem is more widespread and systematic in the following states: Kano, Akwa Ibom, Katsina, Kaduna, Taraba, Sokoto, Yobe, Zamfara, Oyo, Benue, Jigawa and Ebonyi states.”
 
Girls are disproportionately represented among out-of-school children. In north-eastern Nigeria alone, 2.8 million children are in need of education-in-emergencies support in three conflict-affected States (Borno, Yobe, Adamawa). In these States, at least 802 schools remain closed and 497 classrooms are listed as destroyed, with another 1,392 damaged but repairable.”
 
Under Nigerian law and international human rights treaties to which Nigeria is a state party, the Nigerian authorities at both the Federal and State levels have a legally binding obligation to immediately provide free, universal quality primary education for all Nigerian children, and to progressively provide education at all other levels without discrimination.”
 
Nigerian authorities over the years have restricted educational opportunities for children with disabilities including by failing to provide equipment such as hearing aids, ramps to school buildings, wheelchairs, crutches, glasses and surgery to children in need, and failing to address educational challenges facing children with disabilities, in general.
 
SERAP notes the launch by your Office in 2016 of the Policy on Children, which aims to send ‘a firm and consistent message that humanity stands united in its resolve that crimes against children will not be tolerated and that their perpetrators will not go unpunished.’ The Policy aims to assist your Office in its efforts to robustly address these crimes, bearing in mind the rights and best interests of children.”
SERAP notes also that at the launch of the Policy you stated among others that, ‘a crime against a child is an offence against all of humanity; it is an affront to our basic tenets of human decency. Children are our greatest resource, and must be protected from harm so as to reach their full potential.  We, at the ICC, intend to play our part through the legal framework of the Rome Statute’.”
 
“This statement is entirely consistent with the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, to which Nigeria is a state party and shows that children will not be invisible in the exercise of the jurisdiction of the ICC, and that your Office will extend its work to ensure the well-being of children, including millions of out-of-school Nigerian children.”
 
“The Rome Statute’s sensitivity towards children’s issues is clearly demonstrated in Article 68(1) to the effect that the Court must ‘have regard to all relevant factors, including gender and the nature of the crime, in particular, where the crime involves sexual or gender violence or violence against children.’ Under Article 54(1), ‘the Prosecutor shall take into account the nature of the crime, in particular where it involves violence against children.’”
 
“SERAP is seriously concerned that the problem of out-of-school children is widespread and systematic, cutting across the 36 states of the country and Abuja, and spanning many years since 1999. The problem of out-of-school children has had catastrophic effects on the lives of millions of children, their families and communities, akin to violence against children under the Court’s Policy, and crimes against humanity as contemplated under the Rome Statue.” 
 
“The Rome Statute in article 7 defines “crime against humanity” to include “inhumane acts causing great suffering or injury,” committed in a widespread or systematic manner against a civilian population. The common denominator of crimes against humanity is that they are grave affronts to human security and dignity.”
 
“The consequences of throwing millions of Nigerian children that should be in school out on the street are similar to those of the offences in article 7(1)(k) of the Rome Statute. Senior government officials know well or ought to know that their failure to prevent millions of Nigerian children from roaming the street will expose the children to violence, deny them their human dignity and exacerbate the growing insecurity in the country.”
 
“SERAP considers the apparent failure of successive governments and high-ranking government officials to prevent widespread and systematic problem of out-of-school children as amounting to complicity under the Rome Statute.”
 
“This crime against Nigerian children has continued to rob our children of their innocence, childhood, and often, tragically, resulted in their untimely deaths, denying Nigeria of its future potential and of its greatest resource.”
 
“The national authorities of the Court’s States Parties form the first line of defense in addressing the crimes against children, as they shoulder the primary responsibility for the investigation and prosecution of perpetrators of the crimes. But successive governments in Nigeria have been unwilling or unable to address the problem of out-of-school children, and end the crime against humanity.”
 
“SERAP believes that substantial grounds exist to warrant the intervention of the Prosecutor in this case. Pursuant to the Rome Statute, the Prosecutor has power to intervene in a situation under the jurisdiction of the Court if the Security Council or states parties refer a situation or if the information is provided from other sources such as the information SERAP is providing in this case.
 
SERAP, therefore, urged the ICC Prosecutor to:
 
  1. Urgently commence an investigation proprio motu on the widespread and systematic problem of out-of-school children in Nigeria since the return of democracy in 1999, with a view to determining whether these amount to violence against children and crime against humanity within the Court’s jurisdiction. In this respect, we also urge you to invite representatives of the Nigerian government to provide written or oral testimony at the seat of the Court, so that the Prosecutor is able to conclude since available information whether there is a reasonable basis for an investigation, and to submit a request to the Pre-Trial Chamber for authorization of an investigation;
  2. Bring to justice those suspected to be responsible for widespread and systematic problem of out-of-school children in Nigeria; 
  3. Urge the Nigerian government to fulfil its obligations under the Rome Statute to cooperate with the ICC; including complying with your requests to arrest and surrender suspected perpetrators of the widespread and systematic crime of leaving millions of Nigerian children out of school, testimony, and provide other support to the ICC
  4. Compel the Nigerian authorities at the Federal and State levels to ensure that millions of out-of-school children are afforded their right to education, access to justice, and ensure reparations to victims, including restitution, compensation, rehabilitation and guarantee of non-repetition
 
Kolawole Oluwadare
SERAP Deputy Director
21/07/2019
Lagos, Nigeria

U.S. Universities Offer Scholarships Worth $7.5m To Nigerians

 

More than 303 Nigerian students from the 17 states of southern Nigeria have received no less than $7.5 million in full or partial scholarships from 225 American universities and colleges to study in the United States for the 2019-2020 academic session.

This was disclosed by the Acting United States Consul General, Osman Tat, during the 2019 EducationUSA pre-departure orientation in Lagos on Tuesday for students who have received offers of admission and scholarships to attend U.S. colleges and universities.

Noting that the U.S. remains a top destination for international students, Tat explained that the list of acceptances for Nigerian students for the upcoming academic year has been quite impressive, cutting across many of the 50 U.S. states.

“I congratulate each one of you on your tremendous success. This is a very important step in your life. I encourage you to make the most out of your time in the United States to acquire the requisite skills and knowledge needed to support Nigeria’s development,” he told the group of US-bound students.

The students have been accepted for undergraduate and graduate degree programs at top-notch US institutions ranging from Ivy League universities, liberal arts colleges, women’s colleges, Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), to community colleges.

They include Stanford University, The George Washington University, Johns Hopkins University, Purdue University, Tufts University, Boston University, Emory University, and Howard University, among many others.

The pre-departure orientation is intended to assist students to prepare for their move from Nigeria to attend a college or university in the United States. The event included interactive sessions on topics such as travel planning, adjusting to life in America, safety on campus, and F-1 visa rules for international students.

Participants also had the opportunity to meet with students currently studying in the United States who offered tips on how to prepare for the U.S. academic, social, and cultural environment.

Among the departing students are 13 EducationUSA Opportunity Fund grantees —10 undergraduate and three graduate students, with full scholarships — who received financial aid to cover the up-front cost of obtaining admission.

Annually, through the Opportunity Fund Program, the U.S. Consulate’s EducationUSA Advising Centre assists talented low-income students who are good candidates for admission to U.S. colleges and universities, by funding their application process.

According to the latest Open Doors Report, published annually by the Institute of International Education, Nigeria is the 13th highest sending country of international students to the U.S., with about 12, 693 Nigerians currently studying in the United States.

Training Journalists In The Era Of Fake News

 

 

As uncannily realistic “deep fake” videos proliferate online, including one recently retweeted by Donald Trump, journalism schools are scrambling to adapt to an era of misinformation — or fake news.

Experts discussed how to train tomorrow’s reporters for these new challenges at the World Journalism Education Congress in Paris last week.

The three-day event — “Teaching Journalism During a Disruptive Age” — was attended by 600 educators and researchers from 70 countries.

“We have journalism educators from places as different as Bangladesh and Uganda, but essentially we all face the same challenges,” congress organiser Pascal Guenee, head of IPJ Dauphine journalism school in Paris, told AFP.

In China, the government makes no secret of its tight grip on the media.

But fake news is seeping into traditional media via Weibo, WeChat and other Chinese-language social media platforms, said journalism professor Peiqin Chen of the Shanghai International Studies University.

“When someone posts false information on Weibo, it can be reposted by a mainstream newspaper’s Weibo account,” she said. “Other mainstream media pick up on it from there.”

“Mainstream media play the biggest role in confirming and spreading fake news in China,” she added.

For politics or profit

It was US President Donald Trump who first popularised the phrase “fake news” in attacks on the news media.

But in May, Trump tweeted a video of US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi which appeared to have been edited to focus on sections of a speech in which she stuttered and mispronounced certain words.

“Pelosi stammers through news conference,” he wrote.

Another doctored Pelosi video, which went viral online, slowed down her speech to give the impression she was drunk.

The motivation behind fake news is not always political, said Gifty Appiah-Adjei from the University of Education in Ghana.

“Often it is for financial gain by creating internet traffic, or it’s entertainment,” she told AFP. “And some people write fake stories just for fun.”

Journalism education “is the most effective means by which fake news can be addressed”, she argued.

Until recently, however, how to detect and counter fake news has rarely been taught as a stand-alone course at journalism schools, she said.

Checking sources has “always been part of the curriculum,” said Kamilla Nigmatullina, senior lecturer at Russia’s Saint Petersburg State University.

But today’s ever-more sophisticated misinformation — including doctored videos and photos — requires a fresh approach.

“Journalism schools in China give some courses in fact-checking, but the academic material we study is based on research in other countries,” said Chen.

“China still has a long way to go.”

But for Nigmatullina, we do not need to develop a whole new discipline.

Technology not the answer

“What we do need is joint research with scholars from different disciplines,” she told AFP.

“We could work with neuroscience students, for example, to determine why people decide to share certain information.”

In one project organised by the European Journalism Training Association (EJTA), students from almost 20 journalism schools in 13 countries participated in the fact-checking of articles in the run-up to the European Union elections.

One of the aims, said project manager Nadia Vissers from the Artesis Plantijn University in Belgium, was to learn the difference between “misinformation” and “disinformation”.

“Misinformation is false information spread without the intention to cause harm,” she explained. “Disinformation has the intention of spreading lies and influencing people.”

Misleading information in the media, for example, about migration, climate change and Brexit was classified as “mostly true”, “mostly false”, “false” or “uncheckable”.

The project runs on a shoe-string budget, said Vissers, because “we don’t want any funding from Facebook or Google”.

“The goal is to train journalists,” said Eric Nahon, deputy head of IPJ Dauphine and chair of the panel discussion.

“Technological solutions are not the answer — we need educated journalists.”

AFP

We Must Abolish The Almajiri System Of Education – Ononuju

PDP member, Katch Ononuju

 

A member of the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP), Katch Ononuju has called for the abolition of the Almajiri system of education in the northern part of the country.

He made the call on Thursday during an interview on Channels Television’s Politics Today.

“The United Nations recommends 26 per cent of your budget to education in developing countries. We spend less than 5.6 per cent of our national budget on education.

“The only good news I have heard today is a campaign I have been doing for the past 10 years that we must abolish the Almajiri system of education. Almaji and polygamy I will say are the two things that have kept Nigeria down.

“We should abolish Almajiri and pump more money and get the children into real schools. You cannot do anything that will help the children if you don’t avail them the logistics,” he said.

READ ALSO: It’s Worrisome Buhari Hasn’t Announced Cabinet, Says Odumakin

Speaking on security, Ononuju said the current administration has failed in addressing the challenges confronting the nation.

He accused the advisers of President Muhammadu Buhari of not giving him the right counsel with good economic priorities that will help the nation.

Ononuju’s comments come shortly after the National Economic Council disclosed that some groups like the Almajiri groups would be proscribed by the Federal Government.

Briefing governors at the meeting chaired by Vice President Yemi Osinbajo, the National Security Adviser, Babagana Monguno noted that the groups are becoming a problem to the society.

Buhari Reiterates Commitment To Tackling Unemployment

 

President Muhammadu Buhari has reiterated his administration’s commitment to tackling the challenge of unemployment in the country.

The president who was represented by the former Deputy Governor of Kano State, Professor Hafiz Abubakar at the 4th convocation ceremony of the Federal University Dutsin-Ma, Katsina State, listed a number of programmes which he says his administration is doing to provide employment and consequently, alleviate poverty.

Some of such initiatives include the N-Power and Tradermoni programmes, as well as agriculture loans for youths and the signing of the NotTooYoungToRun Bill.

Read Also: We Can Lift 100 Million Nigerians Out Of Poverty In 10 Years-Buhari

According to him, the signing of the bill would encourage youths to participate actively in politics and acquire leadership skills at a tender age, which he believes would potentially prolong their positive services to the country.

The President further stated that his administration is fully aware of the challenges confronting all sectors of the economy, especially education.

He noted that his government is doing everything possible to improve structures and facilities in Nigerian institutions and to provide maximum manpower and training through the various TETFUND intervention programmes.

Insecurity: We Are Spending N500bn To Fight 100,000 Terrorists, Says Ben Murray-Bruce

Murray-Bruce's Comments On Canadian Doctors’ Pay Spark Debate
File photo: Ben Murray-Bruce

 

Senator Ben Murray-Bruce, the lawmaker representing Bayelsa East, has said that there is a problem with the amount allocated to the education of Nigerian youths and children.

Ben Murray-Bruce On Wednesday in a series of tweets not unconnected to the issue of poor education funding in the country, noted the defence and security budget of Nigeria is 3 times the education & youth development budget.

Murray-Bruce argued that the reason we are arming our soldiers to kill is that the nation is not equipping the youths with the required skills to make a positive impact.

To drive home his point, the lawmaker tweeted:

READ ALSO: Invest In Education Not Just Anti-Corruption, Ben Bruce Tells Buhari

Meanwhile, Senator Murray-Bruce also on Wednesday said that he presented two important bills on the floor of the Nigerian Senate.

According to his tweets, the bills are for the introduction of electric cars and alteration of the 1999 constitution.

Below are the tweets by the Senator in which he explained what the first bill seeks to achieve.

Economy: Oil Cannot Save Nigeria – Ben Murray-Bruce

Mace Theft: If NASS Is Unsafe, Villa Is Not Safe – Murray-Bruce

 

Senator Ben Bruce has decried the nation’s is continued quest to discover oil in the north rather than educate about 12 million out of school children.

The lawmaker representing Bayelsa East Senatorial District in the National Assembly said the situation is a sad one in that the crave for oil is coming at a time when the world is phasing out crude.

Ben Murray-Bruce stressed that oil will not save Nigeria, with a reference to Venezuela a nation with one of the largest crude oil reserves.

READ ALSO: Invest In Education Not Just Anti-Corruption, Ben Bruce Tells Buhari

“We spend more money prospecting for oil in Northern Nigeria than on educating our 12 million out of school children, at a time when the world is phasing out crude oil. Venezuela, the country with the largest crude oil reserves in the world, is bankrupt! Oil cannot save Nigeria.”

He further stressed that the Nigerian population is growing faster than its economy, noting that if priorities are not set right, situations in the country will grow worse.

“Our population is growing faster than our economy. With this new revelation about the automobile industry unstoppably heading towards electric cars, it is only going to be worse if we don’t act now. Are we even preparing for life after oil? It is coming whether we like it or not,” the Senator stated via Twitter.

Invest In Education Not Just Anti-Corruption, Ben Bruce Tells Buhari

Murray-Bruce's Comments On Canadian Doctors’ Pay Spark Debate
File photo: Ben Murray-Bruce

 

Senator Ben Bruce has asked President Muhammadu Buhari to turn his eyes towards education and not just remain focused on anti-corruption.

The lawmaker representing Bayelsa East Senatorial District in the National Assembly made this assertion via Twitter on Sunday, March 31.

Ben Bruce argued that those who open the doors of schools shut the gates of prisons.

He said, “Dear President @MBuhari, Invest in education, not just in anti-corruption.

“Instead of throwing people in jail, remember that he who opens the doors of a school closes the doors of prisons.

“It is sad that you have built not ONE school. Not even one. Yet you want crime to end?.”

READ ALSO: NASS Leadership: ‘What Oshiomole Is Breeding Is No Longer Democracy’, Suleiman Hunkuyi

Senator Bruce also spoke on behalf of kids who leave school to get a job and the growing rate of unemployment in the country.

He said, “If we don’t create the right atmosphere for KIDS who leave school to get jobs, why then should we be surprised when they engage in KIDNAPPING? This is a matter of cause and effect. People don’t kidnap because they are evil. Kidnapping is a poverty-induced crime. Solve poverty”.

The lawmaker went on to recommend the “Bayelsa educational model” to the Muhammadu Buhari government at the Federal level.

He said, “Don’t be too proud to learn from Governor @iamHSDickson. The best way to fight terrorism in the Northeast, banditry in the Northwest and kidnapping nationwide is to build schools.”

Speaking further about unemployment, Senator Bruce opined that as unemployment reduces, crime also reduces.

“Crime is just absence of employment and presence of mischief. Just like shadows disappear at the presence of light, so does crime disappear at the presence of employment. Educate and provide employment in Nigeria, and you reduce crime,” Senator Bruce said.

Police, Power Sector Top SERAP’s List of ‘Most Corrupt Institutions’ In Nigeria

SERAP Threatens To Sue UI, AAUA Over Increased Fees

 

A survey conducted by the Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP) has revealed that the Nigeria Police and the Power Sector are the most corrupt public institutions in Nigeria.

The survey which was launched by Professor Akin Oyebode on Tuesday in Lagos said the exercise captured responses of Nigerians and 70 percent placed the Judiciary, Education and Health ministries next, to complete a top five list.

Oyebode noted that; “Nigeria is looked upon as a giant of Africa. Yet Nigeria could not conduct free, fair and credible elections. It is a smear on the image of Nigeria. If we do away with selective enforcement and condonation of corruption, we will build and live in a better society. Corruption is a refined form of stealing. The politicians are stealing our common patrimony. Development of the people is almost inversely proportional to the level of corruption.”

READ ALSO: Five-Year-Old Kidnapped In Delta Rescued In Nasarawa – Police

However, the survey highlighted that the high levels of corruption in public institutions in Nigeria had not changed in the last five years.

According to the survey, “a bribe is paid in 54% of interactions with the police. In fact, there is a 63% probability that an average Nigerian would be asked to pay a bribe each time he or she interacted with the police. That is almost two out of three.”

“Corruption remains a significant impediment to law enforcement, access to justice and basic public services such as affordable healthcare, education, and electricity supply. Several Nigerians have to pay a bribe to access police, judiciary, power, education and health services. Corruption is still a key concern in the country with 70% of Nigerians describing the level of corruption as high and in the same measure, stating that corruption levels either increased or remained the same in the last five years.”

“The police were the most adversely ranked on this indicator. For every 100 police interactions reported by the respondents, there was a bribe paid in 54 interactions. The prevalence levels stood at 37% in the power sector and 18% in education, 17.7% in the judiciary and 14% in the health sector.”

The survey urged the Inspector General of Police (IGP), Mohammed Adamu, The Chief Justice of Nigeria and the National Judicial Council should investigate complaints of bribery and corruption against police officers and review all outstanding cases of judicial corruption.

“The Inspector General of Police should receive and investigate complaints of bribery and corruption against police officers filed by members of the public. The police should liaise with community leaders and civil society organisations in regard to incidents of police bribery and corruption within the community.”

“The Chief Justice of Nigeria and the National Judicial Council should identify and review all outstanding cases of judicial corruption and refer such cases to appropriate anti-corruption agencies. They should apply the Code of Conduct for Judicial Officers in a consistent and transparent manner, with full respect for the fundamental guarantees of fair trial and due process.”

According to SERAP, the survey targeted a total of 2,655 respondents selected from seven states spread across the six geo-political zones of Nigeria and the capital city of Abuja.