PHOTOS: Buhari In London For Medical Check-Up, Education Summit

President Muhammadu Buhari with Nigeria High Commissioner to London, Ambassador Sarafa Ishola; the Lord Lieutenant of Sussex, Mrs Jennifer Tolhurst, and Mr David Pearey, shortly after he arrived in the United Kingdom.

 

President Muhammadu Buhari on Monday departed Nigeria for the United Kingdom to participate in the Global Education Summit on Financing Global Partnership for Education (GPE) 2021-2025.

After the event, he would spend a few days in the United Kingdom for an earlier scheduled medical check-up, his Special Adviser on Media and Publicity, Femi Adesina, had disclosed in a statement.

The President’s aircraft departed Abuja on Monday evening and arrived in London hours later, where the summit is scheduled to take place.

He was welcomed by the Nigeria High Commissioner to London, Ambassador Sarafa Ishola, as well as the Lord Lieutenant of Sussex, Mrs Jennifer Tolhurst, and Mr David Pearey, among others.

According to Adesina, the summit will be co-hosted by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Boris Johnson, and the President of Kenya, Uhuru Kenyatta.

It is expected to bring together Heads of State and Government, as well as stakeholders and youth leaders, and provide a platform for partners to chart a way forward towards transforming education systems in partner countries, through the exchange of best practices.

The event will also offer the opportunity for leaders to make five-year pledges to support GPE’s work to help transform education systems in up to 90 countries and territories.

President Buhari, his media adviser noted, was accompanied by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Geoffrey Onyeama; the Minister of State for Education, Chukwuemeka Nwajiuba; the National Security Adviser, Major General Babagana Monguno (rtd), and the Director-General of National Intelligence Agency (NIA), Ambassador Ahmed Rufai.

Highpoints of the President’s departure and arrival are captured in the photos below:

Buhari To Travel To London For Medical Check-Up, Education Summit

A file photo of President Muhammadu Buhari wearing a facemask.

 

President Muhammadu Buhari is set to travel to the United Kingdom on Monday, said his Special Adviser on Media and Publicity, Femi Adesina.

Adesina, in a statement, explained that the President would embark on the trip to participate in the Global Education Summit on Financing Global Partnership for Education (GPE) 2021-2025.

After the event, he disclosed that the President would spend a few days in the United Kingdom for an earlier scheduled medical check-up.

The summit will be co-hosted by the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, Boris Johnson, and the President of Kenya, Uhuru Kenyatta.

It is expected to bring together Heads of State and Government, as well as stakeholders and youth leaders, and provide a platform for partners to chart a way forward towards transforming education systems in partner countries, through the exchange of best practices.

READ ALSO: 10 Media Organisations Accredited, Others Barred From Nnamdi Kanu’s Trial

According to Adesina, the event will also offer the opportunity for leaders to make five-year pledges to support GPE’s work to help transform education systems in up to 90 countries and territories.

“Deliberations at the summit will focus on: The Power of Education – A Conversation between Global Champions; Transforming Education for Girls; Financing for Impact and Recovery and; What Now? Priorities for Transforming Education in the Coming Five Years, among others,” he said.

The presidential aide added that President Buhari would hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Johnson.

He noted that the President would return to the country by the second week of August, although no specific date was given.

President Buhari, according to Adesina, will be accompanied by the Minister of Foreign Affairs, Geoffrey Onyeama, and the Minister of State for Education, Chukwuemeka Nwajiuba.

Others are the National Security Adviser, Major General Babagana Monguno (rtd), and the Director-General of National Intelligence Agency (NIA), Ambassador Ahmed Rufai.

I Just Went For Medical Check-Up, I Am Alright – Buhari

President Muhammadu Buhari at the Nnamdi Azikiwe International Airport upon his arrival in Nigeria on Friday after a three-day medical trip to London.

 

President Muhammadu Buhari on his arrival at the airport in Abuja on Friday said he is in good condition.

The President’s aircraft touched down at Nnamdi Azikiwe Airport in Abuja on Friday by 7:00 pm after a three-day medical trip to London, United Kingdom.

When asked on by journalists why he arrived on Friday after his schedule of returning on Saturday, the President said his arrival is not earlier than expected.

“It is not earlier than expected. I just went for a further medical check-up and I am alright, thank you,” President Buhari said.

In a tweet announcing his departure, President Buhari on Monday said, “I will be travelling to the United Kingdom tomorrow, to see my doctor, at his request. Will be away for four days; back in Abuja on Saturday, May 12.”

His Special Assistant on Media and Publicity, Garba Shehu, had said the President would return on Saturday but he returned back to the country a day earlier.

Using his official Twitter handle @MBuhari, the President also announced his returned to the country.

“President is back in Abuja. He arrived this evening from London,” the presidency wrote on its Twitter account.

Buhari, who last year spent some five months receiving treatment in the British capital, had left on Tuesday to see his doctor.

The move stoked fresh doubts about the president’s health and his ability to campaign for re-election at polls scheduled for February next year.

The main opposition Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) said Buhari was clearly unwell and unfit to govern.

The PDP has previously claimed he was being treated for prostate cancer. Buhari has said those claims were untrue.

A Senior Advocate of Nigeria, Femi Falana, also criticised President Muhammadu Buhari for embarking on a medical trip to the United Kingdom.

He said on Channels Television’s Programme, Sunrise Daily on Thursday that the President and other Nigerians who travel abroad for medical attention are ridiculing the nation.

“These medical trips by the President and the rich in Nigeria expose our country to ridicule because you cannot justify that a little of enormous resources cannot fix a few hospitals to the extent that everybody can be treated in Nigeria,” Falana said.

Fewer Blood Pressure Screens May Be More Effective

Less may be more when it comes to blood pressure checks, according to a new study.

After analyzing five years’ worth of data for more than 400 patients, researchers conclude that the current practice of screening at every visit to the doctor’s office – up to several times a year – may result in more people mistakenly diagnosed and unnecessarily treated for high blood pressure than would simple yearly screening.

Blood pressure measurements are often taken without following proper procedure, according to lead study author Dr. Gregory Garrison, so the readings can be widely inaccurate and lead to some people being wrongly diagnosed with hypertension, while others who have the condition are written off as just “more false positives.”

“One, it results in unnecessary patient anxiety, repeated clinic visits, and laboratory testing,” Garrison, of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, told Reuters Health by email. “Two, it often lulls physicians into writing off a positive result because so few are confirmed.”

Garrison and his colleagues found that taking fewer readings, while still sometimes inaccurate, would weed out almost half of the false positives.

The researchers looked at Mayo Clinic records for 68 patients diagnosed with high blood pressure and 372 patients without high blood pressure. Based on the readings from every doctor’s visit, all 68 high blood pressure cases were identified, but 110 people without high blood pressure would also potentially have been wrongly diagnosed because of a stray high measurement.

When the researchers analyzed the same data but only considered one measurement per patient per year, they identified 63 of the patients with high blood pressure – at or before the original date of their actual diagnosis – and got 67 false positives, according to the results published in the Annals of Family Medicine.

An office blood pressure measurement can be inaccurate if it is not performed with the patient seated, arm supported, after a five-minute period of rest. Otherwise, blood pressure can rise temporarily for a variety of reasons, including the mild stress of being tested by a doctor, known as the “white coat effect.”

“Blood pressure technique is not good at all, and does overestimate a lot of the time,” said Dr. William Cushman, chief of the Preventive Medicine section at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Memphis, Tennessee.

But he disagrees with the Mayo team’s conclusion. Overestimation results in unnecessary expense and anxiety, but doesn’t usually harm the patient, said Cushman, who was not involved in the new study.

If less frequent testing fails to identify a few positive cases, that could be a bigger problem, he told Reuters Health.

In the study, annual testing failed to identify five of the 68 cases of hypertension, or a little over seven percent, which was not statistically significant in that case. But it could become significant when applied to a larger population, according to Cushman.

“In populations, we don’t want to miss ten percent of people,” Cushman said.

High risk patients with high blood pressure can start to see the benefits of treatment after six months or a year, so waiting twelve months between tests could have consequences for some, he added.

For most people, hypertension is a slow moving disease, and a diagnosis delayed by a few months or a year is unlikely to have noticeable negative consequences, according to Garrison.

“However, we have a number of patients, perhaps as many as 30 percent, who have hypertension for years without diagnosis and proper treatment,” Garrison said. “This can result in heart disease, kidney disease, and many other complications.”

These people can have elevated readings for years that go unnoticed or undiagnosed because they are written off as false positives and attributed to pain, infection or some other cause, he explains.

Measuring blood pressure less often and taking each reading more seriously could help catch some of those undiagnosed cases, Garrison believes.

The United States Preventive Services Task Force, a government-backed advisory body, recommends blood pressure screening once every two years for people at low risk for the condition and once yearly for those at high risk.

Doctors continue to test at every visit partly because patients expect it, Cushman said, and partly because there are generally no organized efforts to ensure patients and doctors remember to screen every year or two.

Before doctors can start screening less, that kind of system of reminders needs to be in place to ensure no patient falls through the cracks, Cushman said.

Getting blood pressure taken is very important,” he added. “If an adult has not had their blood pressure taken in a year, or they don’t know what it was, then they should get it taken fairly soon, or ask for it,” he said.

SOURCE: bit.ly/Yp5jZD Annals of Family Medicine, March/April 2013.