40 Notable Deaths Of 2019

 

From Nobel-winning novelist Toni Morrison to iconic fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld and Zimbabwe strongman Robert Mugabe, here are some of the notable deaths of 2019.

January

– 21: Argentine footballer Emiliano Sala, 28, was killed when the plane he was in crashed into the English Channel.

– 26: French film composer Michel Legrand, who won three Oscars and scored such classics as “Yentl” (1983), died aged 86.

February

– 7: Veteran British actor Albert Finney, winner of three Golden Globes, passed away aged 82.

– 16: Bruno Ganz, the Swiss actor best known for his role as Adolf Hitler in “Downfall” (2004), died aged 77 from cancer.

– 19: Haute couture legend Karl Lagerfeld, long-running artistic director of Chanel, died aged 85.

– 21: Stanley Donen, US director of such beloved Hollywood classic as “Singin’ in the Rain” (1952), was 94 when he died.

– 28: US-German composer and conductor Andre Previn, winner of 10 Grammys and four Oscars, died aged 89.

March

– 4: US actor Luke Perry died after a stroke at the age of 52.

– 4: Frontman of British rave band The Prodigy, Keith Flint, was found dead aged 49.

– 29: Pioneering female French film director Agnes Varda passed away aged 90.

April

– 17: Ex-Peruvian president Alan Garcia, 69, killed himself as the police were about to arrest him on bribery charges that he denied.

May

– 13: Hollywood legend Doris Day died aged 97.

– 16: Ieoh Ming Pei, Chinese-American architect of iconic modern structures such as the Louvre Pyramid in Paris, was 102 years old when he passed away.

– 20: Austria’s three-time Formula One world champion Niki Lauda died aged 70, eight months after a lung transplant.

– 22: British children’s author and illustrator Judith Kerr died aged 95.

June

– 1: Star Spanish football striker Jose Antonio Reyes, 35, was killed in a car crash.

– 15: Italian film-maker and opera director Franco Zeffirelli died aged 96.

– 17: Islamist Egyptian president Mohamed Morsi, ousted in 2013 after one year of divise rule, died in prison aged 67.

– 17: American heiress and socialite Gloria Vanderbilt passed away aged 95.

July

– 6: Brazilian musician and songwriter Joao Gilberto, a pioneer of bossa nova, died aged 88.

– 16: South African singer Johnny Clegg died at 66 years old from cancer.

– 17: Andrea Camilleri, the Italian novelist who created Sicilian detective Montalbano, passed away aged 93.

– 22: Former Chinese prime minister Li Peng, a hardliner in the 1989 Tiananmen Square crackdown, died at 90.

– 25: The world’s oldest president, Tunisian Beji Caid Essebsi, died aged 92, just ahead of the end of his first mandate.

August

– 5: Author Toni Morrison, the first African-American to win the Nobel Prize for Literature, died aged 88.

– 10: US financier Jeffrey Epstein, 66, was found dead in jail from an apparent suicide while awaiting trial on charges of trafficking girls for sex.

– 12: Ivory Coast singer DJ Arafat died in a motorbike crash aged 33.

– 16: US actor Peter Fonda, best known for “Easy Rider” (1969), died from lung cancer aged 79.

September

– 3: German photographer Peter Lindbergh, credited with launching careers of supermodels like Naomi Campbell and Cindy Crawford, died aged 74.

– 6: Zimbabwe’s autocratic leader Robert Mugabe, ousted by the military in 2017 after 37 years in power, died aged 95.

– 9: Pioneering Swiss-born documentary photographer Robert Frank passed away at 94.

– 19: Tunisia’s Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, the first leader to be toppled in the 2011 Arab Spring, died in exile in Saudi Arabia aged 83.

– 26: Jacques Chirac, French president from 1995 to 2007, died aged 86.

– 30: Celebrated American opera singer Jessye Norman died in hospital aged 74.

October

– 17: Alicia Alonso, Cuban ballet legend who taught well into her 90s, passed away at the age of 98.

– 17: US Democratic Congressman Elijah Cummings died at 68 and was the first African-American lawmaker to lie in state in the Capitol building.

– 22: Belgian Paralympic champion Marieke Vervoort, suffering from a degenerative muscle disease, ended her life through euthanasia aged 40.

– 26: Islamic State group leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, in his late 40s, blew himself up during a raid by US special forces in Syria.

November

– 24: Clive James, the Australian broadcaster, writer, critic, and poet, died aged 80 after a long battle with leukaemia.

– 30: One of the leading conductors to emerge from the former Soviet Union, Latvian Mariss Jansons, 76, died of cardiac arrest at his home in Saint Petersburg.

Mugabe To Be Buried Saturday At Rural Home, Says Family

The casket containing the body of Zimbabwe’s late former president, Robert Mugabe is hoisted by soldiers in ceremonial uniform after it arrived on September 12, 2019 at the historic Rufaro stadium in the capital, Harare.

 

 

Zimbabwe’s ex-president Robert Mugabe will be buried Saturday afternoon, his nephew said Friday, after the remains were moved from his Harare house to his rural village ahead of the event.

The country’s founding leader died in a Singapore hospital earlier this month, aged 95, almost two years after a military coup ended his nearly four-decade rule.

After weeks of wrangling between government and his family over the final resting place, the Mugabes have opted to entomb him at his birth place and rural home, about 90 kilometres (55 miles) west of the capital.

“As per our Zimbabwean tradition, the elderly are always buried in the afternoon, so it will be after 2pm (1200GMT),” Leo Mugabe told AFP.

The body was moved by road on Thursday evening with a police and military vehicle escort, according to a video clip shared on Twitter.

It was the second time it made its way back to Kutama village in Zvimba district where Mugabe was born 95 years ago.

When the body was first taken home last week for the public to pay their last respects, it was airlifted by a military helicopter.

“The body arrived (at the village) around 1900 hours, yesterday,” nephew and family spokesman Leo Mugabe told AFP on Friday.

Justice Minister Ziyambi Ziyambi told the state-owned The Herald daily on Thursday that “the body of the late Mugabe left Harare for Zvimba, awaiting burial set for Saturday”.

Mausoleum snub

The decision to bury Mugabe in the village has been seen as an apparent snub of the government offer to bury him at a specially-built mausoleum at a national heroes shrine in Harare where dozens of other prominent independence war veterans are interred.

The family had previously agreed to have his body entombed at the shrine where preparations for the special mausoleum were already in progress.

Minister Ziyambi said the family had earlier consented that they were “happy with burial at Heroes Acre”, but suddenly on Thursday “they indicated that they want to go to Zvimba and (the) government agreed”.

The family gave no reason for the change of plans.

The former guerilla leader, who came to power at the end of white minority rule in 1980 and ruled Zimbabwe uninterrupted for 37 years and seven months, died of prostate cancer, according to his successor President Emmerson Mnangagwa.

He was toppled on November 2017 in a military-backed coup, ending an increasingly iron-fisted rule marked by political oppression and economic ruin.

Mugabe’s health deteriorated rapidly after the ousting and he made regular medical trips to Singapore, where he died on September 6.

Mugabe To Be Buried This Weekend – Family

Pallbearers carry the coffin of late former Zimbabwe President Robert Mugabe for a mass at the family homestead in Kutama village, 80km northwest of Harare, on September 17, 2019.

 

The remains of Zimbabwe’s ex-president Robert Mugabe who died early this month, have been moved from his Harare house to his rural village ahead of burial expected this weekend, his family said on Friday.

After weeks of wrangling between the government and his family over the final resting place for the country’s founding leader, the Mugabes have opted to entomb him at his birthplace and rural home, about 90 kilometres (55 miles) west of the capital Harare.

The body was moved by road on Thursday evening under police and military vehicles escort, according to a video clip shared on Twitter.

It was the second time it made its way back to Kutama village in Zvimba district where Mugabe was born 95 years ago.

When the body was first taken home last week for the public to pay their last respects, it was airlifted by a military helicopter.

“The body arrived (at the village) around 1900 hours, yesterday,” family spokesman and Mugabe’s nephew Leo Mugabe told AFP on Friday.

Justice Minister Ziyambi Ziyambi, told the state-owned The Herald daily on Thursday that “the body of the late Mugabe left Harare for Zvimba, awaiting burial set for Saturday”.

The decision to bury Mugabe in the village is seen as an apparent snub of the government offer to bury him at what was to be a specially-built mausoleum at a national heroes shrine in Harare where dozens of other prominent independence war veterans are interred.

The family had previously agreed to have his body entombed at the shrine where preparations for a special mausoleum were already in progress.

Minister Ziyambi said the family had earlier consented that they were “happy with burial at Heroes Acre”, but suddenly on Thursday “they indicated that they want to go to Zvimba and (the) government agreed”.

The family gave no reason for the change of plans.

The former guerilla leader, who came to power at the end of white minority rule in 1980 and ruled Zimbabwe uninterrupted for 37 years and seven months, died of prostate cancer, according to his successor Emmerson Mnangagwa.

He was toppled on November 2017 in a military-backed coup, ending an increasingly iron-fisted rule marked by political oppression and economic ruin.

Mugabe’s health deteriorated rapidly after the ousting and he made regular medical trips to Singapore, where he died on September 6.

AFP

Mugabe Died Of Cancer, Says Zimbabwe Media

 

Zimbabwe’s founding president Robert Mugabe had “advanced cancer” when he died in hospital in Singapore on September 6, the state-owned newspaper reported on Monday.

The former guerilla leader, who died aged 95, came to power at the end of white minority rule in 1980 and ruled Zimbabwe uninterrupted for 37 years and seven months.

He was toppled on November 2017 in a military-backed coup, ending an increasingly iron-fisted rule marked by political oppression and economic ruin.

READ ALSO: At Least 20 Killed, Dozens Injured In Papua Unrest

Mugabe’s health deteriorated rapidly after the ousting and he made regular trips to Singapore to seek treatment.

“Mugabe had advanced cancer, and had to be taken off chemotherapy treatment because it was no longer effective,” said The Herald on Monday.

The information was revealed by President Emmerson Mnangagwa during an address to party supporters in New York on Saturday, according to the paper.

“Doctors had stopped treatment… because of age and also because cancer had spread and it was not helping anymore,” said Mnangagwa, cited by the Herald.

Mugabe’s nephew Leo Mugabe told AFP he had “no comment on that”.

The family had previously downplayed Mugabe’s frequent trips to Singapore as necessary for cataract treatment.

In 2011, whistle-blower site Wikileaks published a diplomatic cable that said Mugabe had prostate cancer.

The cable, written in 2008 by the US embassy in Harare, said the former president had five years left to live at the time.

Mugabe is expected to be buried next month at a monument for national heroes in Zimbabwe’s capital Harare.

Zimbabwe Bids Farewell To Mugabe With State Funeral

People sit and wait at the National Sports stadium where the official funeral for Robert Mugabe is to be held in Harare, on September 14, 2019/AFP

 

Zimbabwe gave former leader Robert Mugabe a state funeral on Saturday with African leaders paying tribute to a man lauded as a liberation hero but whose 37-year rule was defined by repression and economic turmoil.

Mugabe, who died in Singapore aged 95, left Zimbabwe deeply divided over his legacy with the southern African country still struggling with high inflation and shortages of goods after decades of mismanagement.

Mugabe died last week on an overseas medical trip almost two years after former army loyalists forced him out in 2017, following a power struggle over what was widely perceived as his bid to position his wife Grace to succeed him.

READ ALSO: Fights Break Out As Hong Kong’s Polarisation Deepens

Former and current African leaders, including South Africa’s Cyril Ramaphosa and Kenya’s Uhuru Kenyatta, arrived to crowds chanting and drumming liberation songs at the 60,000-capacity national stadium in Harare for Saturday’s ceremony.

Mugabe’s casket draped in the green, black, gold and red Zimbabwe flag was marched slowly into the stadium, accompanied by a military band and an escort of officers. His wife Grace, in a black veil, and family followed behind.

“Let us put aside our differences and come together as we remember the past and look to the future as one proud, independent and free nation,” Zimbabwe President Emmerson Mnangagwa said in a tweet.

Mugabe’s body was returned from Singapore on Wednesday to a country he helped found as an anti-colonial guerrilla and pan-African leader who ended white-minority rule and helped bring more education and healthcare to the poor black majority.

Later, Mugabe turned to repression and fear to crush dissidents and rule for nearly four decades during which he become an international pariah for his takeover of white-owned farms.

“You can’t talk about Zimbabwe without Bob. Zimbabwe is Bob. It took a man like Bob, his bravery, to get independence,” said Norman Gombera, 57, a school principal in Harare. “Bob did his best under the circumstances. There is no country without a problem.”

– Bitter legacy –
His final burial at a national monument will only happen after a new mausoleum is built in about 30 days. That decision was taken after his family ended a dispute with Mnangagwa, a former ally who turned against his rule in 2017.

Though lauded as an African icon, at home many Zimbabweans will remember Mugabe more for the economic mismanagement that forced millions to flee the country during decades of crisis.

Many are struggling to survive despite Mnangagwa’s vows of more investment and jobs in the post-Mugabe era.

“The fruits of his tenure are the shortages. That is what we remember him for,” said Steven, a consultant shopping nearby the stadium.

“He has made sure there is no opposition and he succeeded. There is no reason to go to his funeral.”

Always divisive in life, Mugabe’s funeral arrangements were also caught up in a dispute between Mnangagwa and the family over where and when the former leader should be buried.

The two parties on Friday finally agreed he should lie at National Heroes Acre. But the final ceremony would take place in about 30 days, once the new mausoleum was built for him there.

His family are still bitter over the role Mnangagwa played in his ouster and had pushed for Mugabe to be buried in his homestead of Zvimba, northwest of Harare.

A former guerrilla who fought alongside Mugabe against colonial forces, Mnangagwa was fired as first vice president by Mugabe in 2017. Mugabe had branded him a “traitor”.

Soon after, protesters took to the streets and military officers pressured Mugabe to step down in what was widely seen as a struggle between Mnangagwa’s faction and loyalists to Mugabe’s wife Grace inside the ruling ZANU-PF party.

The “heroes” monument, where more than 130 national figures are buried in black marble tombs, sits on a hilltop overlooking Harare. Mugabe’s first wife, Sally, is also buried there.

Mugabe’s Family Agree To Burial In ‘Heroes’ Monument

The casket containing the body of Zimbabwe’s late former president, Robert Mugabe is hoisted by soldiers in ceremonial uniform after it arrived on September 12, 2019 at the historic Rufaro stadium in the capital, Harare, where his body will lie in state for members of the public file past.

 

The family of former Zimbabwe leader Robert Mugabe have agreed to bury him at a monument for national heroes in Harare, a family spokesman said on Friday though the date for the ceremony was still unclear.

Mugabe died in Singapore last week aged 95, leaving Zimbabweans torn over the legacy of a leader once lauded as an anti-colonial guerrilla hero, but whose 37-year iron-fisted rule ended in a coup in 2017.

His family and President Emmerson Mnangagwa, a former Mugabe ally who turned against him, had been at odds over where he would be buried after his body returned home on Wednesday.

READ ALSO: Relatives Fly To Singapore To Bring Mugabe’s Body Home

“Yes I can confirm,” Leo Mugabe told reporters when asked whether the family had agreed to a burial in National Heroes Acre in Harare.

He said the traditional chiefs in Mugabe’s homestead had made that decision.

“They have now pronounced their position so if they have pronounced that the burial will be at the Heroes Acre that means that we now have to wait for the details… whether it will be a private burial or a public one.”

Tensions erupted after Mnangagwa’s government proposed a burial at the National Heroes Acre in Harare while the family said he would be buried at a private ceremony, possibly in his homestead of Kutama, northwest of the capital.

The former leader had been travelling to Singapore regularly for medical treatment but allies say his health deteriorated rapidly after his ouster. Mugabe’s body arrived from Singapore on Wednesday at Harare airport.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, Cuban former leader Raul Castro and a dozen African presidents, including South Africa’s Cyril Ramaphosa, are among those expected to attend Mugabe’s state funeral on Saturday in Harare.

Mugabe’s Body Returns To Zimbabwe For Burial

 

The body of Zimbabwe’s ex-president, Robert Mugabe, was flown out of Singapore Wednesday, heading home for burial in a country divided over the legacy of a former liberation hero whose 37-year rule was marked by repression and economic ruin.

Mugabe, a guerrilla leader who swept to power after Zimbabwe’s independence from Britain and governed until he was ousted by the military in 2017, died on Friday, aged 95.

His health deteriorated after he was toppled by the army and former loyalists in November 2017, ending an increasingly iron-fisted rule during which he crushed his opponents.

He died on a medical trip to Singapore, where he had been travelling regularly for treatment. A delegation including Vice President Kembo Mohadi headed to the affluent city-state on a chartered flight to bring him home.

READ ALSO: Relatives, Officials Attend Mass For Mugabe In Singapore

Early Wednesday a hearse transporting Mugabe’s body left a Singapore funeral parlour and made its way to an airport accompanied by a police escort, driving past a group of waiting journalists.

A plane carrying the former leader and the visiting delegation departed shortly afterwards, his nephew Adam Molai told AFP.

“It just left now,” he said by phone from the plane as it took off, with the noise of the aircraft audible in the background.

Chinese President Xi Jinping, former Cuban leader Raul Castro and a dozen African presidents, including South Africa’s Cyril Ramaphosa, are among those expected to attend Mugabe’s state funeral on Saturday in Harare, Zimbabwe’s presidency said.

Mugabe’s final burial place on Sunday, though, is still unclear.

His family and President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s government are apparently at odds over whether it would be at his homestead northwest of Harare or at a shrine for liberation heroes in the capital.

“The body of the late former president shall be received at the Robert Mugabe international airport,” Zimbabwean Information Minister Monica Mutsvangwa told reporters. “Details of the burial arrangement will be advised in due course.”

– From hero to tyrant –
At home, Zimbabweans have been divided over how to mourn a man once hailed for ridding the former British colony Rhodesia of white-minority rule but who later purged his foes in a campaign of massacres and executions known as the Gukurahundi.

His increasingly tyrannical leadership and economic mismanagement prompted millions to flee a country crippled by hyper-inflation and shortages of food, drugs and fuel.

Following his death, Mnangagwa announced Mugabe had been declared a “national hero”, flags flew at half mast across Harare and news of his passing was splashed across newspaper front pages.

Yet Harare residents appeared largely unconcerned, with shops remaining open and people going about their daily errands.

On arrival in Zimbabwe, Mugabe’s body will be taken straight to his village in Kutama, in Zvimba district west of the capital Harare, for an overnight wake.

On Thursday and Friday the body will lie in state at Rufaro Stadium in Mbare township in Harare for the public to pay their final respects. Officials plan to bus people in from the provinces to attend.

The 35,000-seat stadium is where Mugabe took his oath of office at a colourful ceremony when colonial Rhodesian Prime Minister Ian Smith handed over the reins of the country.

There Mugabe hoisted the new Zimbabwe flag and lit the independence flame on April 18, 1980 — bringing hope for a new era after a long guerrilla war.

The official funeral will take place on Saturday, at the giant 60,000-seat National Sports Stadium in Harare, where foreign leaders will attend.

A relative has said that in line with native Shona customs, traditional chiefs from Zvimba will have a final say on where the former leader will be buried.

‘Latex Gloves Serve As Urine Bags’, Zimbabwean Hospitals Struggle With Mugabe’s Legacy

 

For Zimbabwe’s doctors, few institutions reflect their country’s decay under Robert Mugabe than their public hospitals, once vaunted but now under-equipped and crumbling.

Latex gloves serve as urine bags, operating rooms lack light bulbs and patients are often required to refuel their own ambulances, medics say.

Mugabe, who died last week in Singapore at age 95, may have swept to power as a liberation hero, but his rule was marked by economic collapse that left his people scrambling to survive.

Zimbabwean doctors note the symbolism of Mugabe seeking treatment 8,000 kilometres (5,000 miles) from home in Singapore’s gleaming Gleneagles clinic, where the cheapest suite costs around US$850 (770 euros) a day.

“It is very symbolic that the former president who presided over all the system for three decades can’t trust the health system,” said Edgar Munatsi, a doctor at Chitungwiza, 30 kms (18 miles) from the capital Harare.

“It says a lot about the current state of our health system.”

Mugabe’s death has left many debating the legacy of a man who ended white minority rule and was initially lauded for advances in public health and education.

In his nearly four-decade rule, Mugabe later brutally repressed opponents and oversaw a catastrophic mismanagement of economy that led to hyper-inflation, food shortages and misery.

Mugabe was not alone in seeking overseas care. Current Vice President Constantino Chiwenga is away for several weeks of treatment in China.

It is not hard to see why.

In Chitungwiza hospital, a glowing sign promising “Quality Health” welcomes patients, but conditions inside say otherwise: Operations are often cancelled for lack of anaesthetic, Munatsi says.

The hospital recently issued an internal memo warning its poorly-paid staff against “eating food made for patients.”

Two-decade Crisis

The situation is equally dramatic in paediatrics at Harare Central Hospital, one of Zimbabwe’s top clinics. Cleaning is done only twice a week, for lack of staff and detergents, doctors told AFP.

The operations are often postponed for lack of running water and nursing staff, in a country mired for two decades in economic crisis.

“In theatre, we have linen full of blood and faeces and you can’t do the laundry,” said one doctor.

He requested anonymity, like many of his colleagues, for fear of reprisals from President Emmerson Mnangagwa’s government.

Only one of three paediatric operating rooms at the central hospital is working.

“We have a four-year waiting list for inguinal hernias, the most common condition in children,” says one of the specialists.

Without treatment, this hernia can cause male infertility.

Drug shortages, obsolete equipment and lack of staff: the mix is sometimes deadly.

“It is heart-breaking when you lose patients who are not supposed to die under normal circumstances,” Munatsi said.

‘Pathetic’

Since the early 1990s, the public health system has steadily deteriorated, whereas before, people came from overseas to be treated in Zimbabwe, recalls one senior doctor.

That is a legacy of the Mugabe years as the country was tipped into endless economic crisis — three-digit inflation, currency devaluations, and shortages of commodities.

In hospitals, patients and loved ones who experience the situation daily, are resigned.

“It’s pathetic,” says Saratiel Marandani, a 49-year-old street vendor who had to buy a dressing for his mother.

Given her age, she should receive free health care. But the reality is starkly different.

“Only the consultations are free (…) if you need paracetamol, you need to buy it yourself.”

His mother will have to do without the ultrasound she needs. At 1,000 Zimbabwean dollars or 100 euros, it’s beyond his reach.

Doctors say they sometimes have to pay out of their own pocket for patients’ medication, or even just their bus ticket home.

At Parirenyatwa Hospital in Harare, Lindiwe Banda lays prostrate on her bed. A diabetic, she was given the green light to go home. But on condition, she paid her bill.

“But I do not even have five Zimbabwean dollars (less than one euro) to pay for the transport,” she said in tears.

“I can’t reach my relatives. I think they have dumped me. They don’t have money, but they should show some love”.

If hospitals and patients are penniless, doctors too cannot escape Zimbabwe’s ruin.

Medics have just begun their latest protest to demand a pay rise after salaries lost 15 times their value in a few months and consumer prices spiralled out of control.

“We are incapacitated,” says Peter Magombeyi, a doctor whose salary is the equivalent of 115 euros a month – a pittance that requires him to do odd jobs to get by.

“We are very aware” of the problems, says Prosper Chonzi, the director of health services in Harare.

“The health system reflects the economy of the country.”

‘I Have Received News Of Continued Burning Of Nigerian Shops And Premises’ – The Week In Quotes

 

The recent xenophobic attacks in South Africa and the death of Zimbabwe’s President, Robert Mugabe, filled the media space in the passing week.

Here are some of the quotes that stood out in the news within the week in focus.

  1. Received sickening and depressing news of continued burning and looting of Nigerian shops and premises in South Africa by mindless criminals with ineffective police protection. Enough is enough. We will take definitive measures.”

The Minister of Foreign Affairs, Mr Geoffrey Onyeama, affirms that indeed Nigerians are being attacked in South Africa.

2. “Yes sir, Nigerian government has boycotted the World Economic Forum holding in Cape Town, South Africa.”

Personal Assistant to the President on New Media, Bashir Ahmad reveals that the Nigerian Government will boycott the World Economic Forum holding in Cape Town, South Africa following attacks on Nigerians and other foreigners

3. “WEF is not the only thing to be boycotted.”

Nigerians react to the government’s decision to boycott the World Economic Forum in South Africa. 

4. “Killing Of Nigerians in South Africa is absolutely unacceptable.”

Vice President Yemi Osinbajo says the attacks on Nigerians in South Africa were reckless.

5. “Zimbabweans suffered for too long under Mugabe.

Zimbabwe’s former colonial ruler Britain on says Zimbabweans had “suffered for too long” under former president Robert Mugabe, reacting to news of his death.

6. “Mugabe was an outstanding national liberation movement leader and politician of Zimbabwe.”

Beijing pays tribute to Zimbabwe’s former leader Robert Mugabe whose death was announced Friday.

7. “In a few months you’ll see me doing something new.”

Cameroon’s four-time African Player of the Year Samuel Eto’o announces his retirement at the age of 38, declaring “I need a rest”.

8. “I’ve decided to retire & have my family.” 

Rap queen Nicki Minaj shocks fans by announcing her retirement from music, saying she was going to focus on family.

9. “I will rather die than delay Brexit.”

Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he would “rather be dead in a ditch” than delay Brexit beyond next month, as he urged opposition lawmakers who oppose his plan to support an early election.

10. “What will I gain if Godwin does not run.” 

The National Chairman of the All Progressives Congress (APC), Mr Adams Oshiomhole, reacts to the series of allegations against him since the reports of the rift between him and Governor Godwin Obaseki of Edo State came to light.

11. “Suspend diplomatic ties with South Africa.”

Court Refuses To Order Ekweremadu's Arrest

Former Deputy President of the Senate, Senator Ike Ekweremadu, condemns the incessant xenophobic attacks on Nigerians and other African nationals in South Africa, describing it as “un-African, barbaric, and unparalleled acts of ingratitude”.

12. “The house will also authorise legal funding for victims of the attack who wish to take legal action against the perpetrators.”

The Speaker of the House of Representatives, Honourable Femi Gbajabiamila says that the House will authorise legal funding for Nigerians who are victims of the recent xenophobic attacks in South Africa.

13. “I will never go to South Africa again.”

In the wake of fresh attacks on Nigerians in South Africa, talented Nigerian artiste, Burna Boy, vows never to visit the country.

14. “Air Peace to evacuate Nigerians from South Africa for free.”

Air Peace Aircraft Collide At Lagos Airport

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs announces that Air Peace Airlines has volunteered to send an aircraft to South Africa from Friday, September 6, to evacuate Nigerians who wish to return to the country, free of charge.

Mugabe’s Body May Return Next Week As Burial Tensions Emerge

 

Robert Mugabe’s nephew said Sunday that a delegation was expected to leave Zimbabwe on Monday to collect the hero-turned-despot’s body from Singapore where he died two days ago.

Mugabe, a guerilla leader who swept to power after Zimbabwe’s independence from Britain and went on to rule for 37 years, died on Friday, aged 95.

His health took a hit after he was ousted by the military in November 2017, ending his increasingly tyrannical rule. He had been travelling to Singapore for treatment since April.

“I can’t give an authoritative day, all I know is people are leaving tomorrow Monday to go and pick up the body,” Leo Mugabe told AFP.

“So assuming they get there on Tuesday and the body is ready, logically you would think they should land here on Wednesday,” he said, adding that a list of accompanying family members was being finalised.

READ ALSO: Mugabe: Zimbabweans Defy National Mourning, Continue With Normal Businesses

Once praised as a liberator who rid Zimbabwe of white minority rule, Mugabe soon turned to repression and fear to govern.

He is widely remembered for crushing political dissent and ruining the economy, prompting mixed reactions to his passing.

At Sacred Heart Cathedral, Mugabe’s parish in the capital Harare, the priest encouraged congregants to pray for their founding leader.

“I know some of us may have different feelings about it, but it’s our duty to pray for one another,” Father Justin Jagaja told AFP.

President Emmerson Mnangagwa declared a period of “national mourning” on Friday, without providing further detail.

The government is expected to announce when Mugabe’s body will be returned to Zimbabwe and provide details of the funeral in coming days.

– Burial tensions –
Mugabe’s family and Mnangagwa appear to disagree on whether the former president will be buried in his rural homestead Zvimba in a ceremony involving local chiefs, or at the National Heroes Acre — a hilltop shrine in Harare commemorating guerillas killed during the liberation struggle.

Leo Mugabe refused to comment on the feud. “All I know is (that) we are closer to an agreement if the chiefs meet up with the president and discuss the issues,” said the nephew.

He explained that his uncle would have been appointed chief of Zvimba had he not become president.

Zimbabwe’s deputy information minister Energy Mutody said the body would rest in Harare.

“His Excellency President ED Mnangagwa has declared former President Robert Gabriel Mugabe a National Hero,” Mutody tweeted on Saturday.

“The former President will be buried at the national heroes acre at a date to be announced.”

The 57-acre site, presided over by three bronze guerilla soldiers, was later opened up to national heroes in the arts and academia.

The family of Zimbabwean Afro-jazz icon and human rights activist Oliver Mtukudzi also refused to bury him at the shrine.

Mtukudzi, who succumbed to diabetes in January, was declared national hero for his social and political influence.

Zimbabweans ‘Suffered For Too Long’ Under Mugabe, Says UK

 

 

Zimbabwe’s former colonial ruler Britain on Friday said Zimbabweans had “suffered for too long” under former president Robert Mugabe, reacting to news of his death.

“We express our condolences to those who mourn Robert Mugabe’s death. However, Zimbabweans suffered for too long as a result of Mugabe’s autocratic role,” the foreign ministry said in a statement.

The statement said there were “mixed emotions” in Zimbabwe at the death of Mugabe.

“We hope that in this new era, Zimbabwe can continue to be set on a more democratic and prosperous path,” it added,

Mugabe won 1980 elections at the end of a black nationalist guerrilla war against white-minority rule in the rebel British colony of Rhodesia.

In 2000, his supporters violently took over white-owned farms — a watershed moment in relations between the West and their protege.

The land reforms were widely condemned worldwide, with Britain’s then prime minister Tony Blair describing the attacks on white farmers as “barbaric”.

Mugabe hit back, calling Blair a “liar” and an “arrogant little fellow”.

Tensions escalated against after the EU and US imposed sanctions, including a travel ban on Mugabe.

Mugabe responded by telling Blair: “Keep your England and let me keep my Zimbabwe.”

Zimbabwe was suspended in 2002 from the Commonwealth, a grouping of former British colonies headed up by Queen Elizabeth II, and pulled out voluntarily in 2003.

Last year, President Emmerson Mnangagwa submitted an application rejoin the Commonwealth after ousting Mugabe.

Buhari Mourns Zimbabwe’s Ex-President Robert Mugabe

 

 

 

President Muhammadu Buhari has sent condolences to the government and people of Zimbabwe over the passing of the founding father and former President, Robert Mugabe.

Robert Mugabe’s death was announced earlier on Friday by the country’s President, Emmerson Mnangagwa.

Mr Mugabe was 95-years-old as at the time of his death.

In a statement by his special aide, Mr Femi Adesina, President Buhari commiserated with family members, friends and political associates of the political activist who fought for the independence of the country from colonial rule, and lived most of his life in public service.

President Buhari stated that he believes Mugabe’s sacrifices, especially in struggling for the political and economic emancipation of his people, will always be remembered by posterity.

He prayed that the Almighty God will grant the soul of the former president rest and comfort his loved ones.