PPPRA Says No Plan To Increase Petrol Price

PPPRA Says No Plan To Increase Petrol PriceThe Petroleum Products Pricing Regulatory Agency (PPPRA) has reaffirmed that the Federal Government has no plan to increase the price of Premium Motor Spirit (PMS), also known as petrol.

The General Manager Operations of PPPRA, Mr Olasupo Agbaje, made the declaration on Monday while addressing reporters in Abuja, Nigeria’s capital.

Mr Agbaje said the agency has also commenced the payment of the new bridging allowance to tanker drivers, as approved by the government recently.

The clarification comes barely a week after the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) said it has no plan to increase the pump price of petrol.

The Corporation, in a statement, stated that the recent increase in bridging allowance to transporters will not affect the prevailing petrol price of 145 Naira per litre.

The NNPC reiterated its commitment to sustaining the existing cordial relationship between the Corporation and the leadership of the downstream industry unions and other stakeholders.

NNPC Says No Hike In Petrol Pump Price

NNPC Says No Hike In Petrol Pump PriceThe Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) has assured Nigerians that it has no plan to increase the pump price of Premium Motor Spirit (PMS), also known as petrol.

In a statement issued on Wednesday by the NNPC spokesman, Ndu Ughamadu, the Corporation explained that the recent increase in bridging allowance to transporters from 6.20 Naira to 7.20 Naira per litre will not affect the prevailing petrol price of 145 Naira per litre.

According to the statement, the clarification was made in Abuja by the NNPC Chief Operating Officer (COO) in charge of Downstream Operations, Mr Henry Ikem Obih.

“Rebalancing Of The Margins”

Mr Obih said there was no plan by government or any of its agencies to review the pump price of petrol above 145 Naira per litre, adding that the rise in the bridging cost was achieved after an adjustment was made in the “lightering expenses” from Four Naira to Three Naira per litre, and the difference transferred to compensate for the cost of bridging within the same template.

The bridging allowance refers to the cost element built into the products pricing template to ensure a uniform price of petrol across the country, while lightering expenses involve charges for moving products to depot area from mother vessels by light vessels, due to the inability of the former to berth in shallow water depth.

“What happened, in simple language, is a rebalancing of the margins allowed and approved for stakeholders. So what the Petroleum Products Pricing Regulatory Agency (PPPRA) did was to take One Naira from lightering expenses and add same to the bridging allowance, that is how we arrived at 7.20 Naira. Therefore, PMS remains at the ceiling of 145 Naira per litre, he said.

“No Risk Of Shortage”

On the availability of product supply, the COO said as at Wednesday, Nigeria has 1.3 billion litres of petrol which translates to an inventory of 36 days.

“What this means is that even if we stop importation or refining of petrol right now, we have enough products in the country to provide for the needs of every Nigerian for a period of 36 days,” he said.

Obih noted that the supply availability was bolstered with the production of petrol from the three refineries located in Port Harcourt, Warri and Kaduna.

“There is absolutely no risk of shortage in supply as we also continue to import, to support the production from the refineries. We have informed the Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR) to enforce the prevailing 145 Naira per litre price regime, and to also ensure that every service station that has fuel is selling to the public,” he said.

The COO reiterated the readiness of the NNPC management under the leadership of its Group Managing Director, Dr. Maikanti Baru, to sustain the existing cordial relationship between the Corporation and the leadership of the downstream industry unions and other stakeholders.

He said the DPR, which is the regulatory arm of the industry, had been alerted to sanction fuel station owners who engage in hoarding, or charge consumers in excess of the approved pump price of petrol.

Dr. Baru had announced the review of the bridging allowance on Monday at a mediation meeting between the Petroleum Tanker Drivers (PTD) and the Nigerian Association of Road Transport Owners (NARTO),

The announcement consequently led to the suspension of an industrial action embarked upon by members of the National Union of Petroleum and Natural Gas Workers (NUPENG).

NNPC, IOC Sign Cash-Call Exit Agreement

NNPC, IOC, Cash-Call AgreementThe Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) and International Oil Companies (IOC) have signed an agreement to exit the Joint Venture Cash-Call Arrangement.

This brings to an end, the NNPC’s counterpart funding for 60% equity shareholding it owns in various oil and gas fields in international and indigenous oil firms.

The agreement was signed on Thursday in Abuja between the national oil company and Shell Petroleum, Nigeria Agip Oil, Total, Chevron and Exxon Mobil.

It is coming barely 24 hours after President Muhammadu Buhari announced that the Federal Government would cut provisions for the Joint Venture Cash-Calls, starting from January 2017.

The Minister of State for Petroleum, Dr. Ibe Kachikwu, noted that a governance process would be set up with immediate effect, to manage a new funding mechanism that would provide for cost recovery.

The NNPC Group Managing Director, Maikanti Baru, on his part, explained that the exit has set the stage for a review of the cash-call agreement.

He added that it has also created an opportunity for the adoption of a more sustainable funding arrangement with international oil companies’ joint venture operations.

Cash-calls is a counterpart funding the NNPC pays annually for the 60% equity shareholding it owns in various oil and gas fields operated by IOC and indigenous oil firms.

In 2016, underfunding for cash-calls amounted to $2.5 billion, bringing the national oil firm’s total cash-call arrears over the years to $8.5 billion.

NNPC Says Gas Flare Rate Has Reduced In Nigeria

NNPC logo2It appears that Government’s intervention in the gas sector is paying off, as the Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation, NNPC, says gas flaring in Nigeria has reduced from 25% to 11%.

The NNPC Group Managing Director, Mr Andrew Yakubu, announced this at a conference organized by the Senate Committee on Gas in Abuja.

The World Bank had listed Nigeria as Africa’s biggest in terms of gas flaring, while a report published by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, OPEC, also ranked Nigeria as the second highest gas flaring nation in the world.

The Federal Government has, meanwhile, been setting and shifting deadlines to end gas flaring for years, but despite the expiration of several deadlines, the most recent being the December 31, 2013 deadline, gas flaring still continued in Nigeria.

The NNPC Group Managing Director, however, said that some progress has been made in reducing gas flaring in the country, as many international oil companies are fast approaching full flare out in the country.

Mr Yakubu said that in the past three years, the Federal Government had begun an aggressive implementation of a nationwide gas infrastructure blueprint with the Government’s intervention beginning to generate a change in the direction of gas in Nigeria.

But while some progress is being made in improving gas infrastructure, the utilization of domestic gas in Nigeria still remains a major issue, and this is according to the Chairman Senate Committee on Gas,Senator Nkechi Nwaogu.

Senator Nwaogu said that an increased use of cooking gas would not only lead to huge savings in billions of dollars on subsidy but would also help cut down greenhouse gas emissions which contribute greatly to global warming.