IGP Orders Investigation Into Killing Of Remo Stars Player

 

The Inspector-General of Police, Mr. Mohammed Adamu, has ordered the Deputy Inspector General of Police in charge of the Force Criminal Investigation Division (FCID), DIG Anthony Ogbizi, to investigate the killing of a player of Remo stars football club, Tiyamiyu Kazeem.

Conflicting reports emerged on Saturday of how Mr Kazeem, an Assistant captain and defender with the club, was killed, with the police claiming that he was knocked down by a vehicle while trying to cross the expressway in order to evade arrest by men of the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (SARS).

However, eyewitness accounts said Mr Kazeem was pushed out of a moving vehicle by police officers, leading to his death.

This sparked outrage by some aggrieved residents who took to the streets to protest the killing of Mr Kazeem, accusing the Police of wrongdoing.

READ ALSO: PHOTOS: Buhari Holds ‘Special’ Meeting With Service Chiefs, IGP

A statement by the Force Public Relations Officer, DCP Frank Mba on Monday said the IGP gave the order today while reviewing daily reports of major crime incidents across the country.

“The IGP M.A Adamu, NPM, mni has ordered the DIG in-charge of the FCID, DIG Anthony Ogbizi to, with immediate effect, take over investigations into the circumstances surrounding the death of Late Mr. Tiamiyu Kazeem in Sagamu, Ogun State on 22nd February 2020,” the statement read in part.

He added that the IGP while commiserating with the family and friends of the deceased called for calm and assured that justice will be done in the matter while reiterating that any person found culpable will be brought to book.

 

Tiyamiyu Kazeem was Assistant Captain and Defender of Remo Stars Football club until his death on Saturday, February 22, 2020. Photo: Remo Stars Twitter Account
Tiyamiyu Kazeem was Assistant Captain and Defender of Remo Stars Football club until his death on Saturday, February 22, 2020. Photo: Remo Stars Twitter Account

 

Channels Television reported that Mr Kazeem was arrested after he was suspected to be wearing a military outfit.

Police Public Relations Officer in Ogun State, Abimbola Oyeyemi, was quoted in a statement saying:

“A Police Inspector attached to Zonal Intervention Squad Obada-Oko in Abeokuta said to have received information about the deceased that he always put on military apparel knowing fully well that he is not military personnel.

“Based on the information, the Inspector went to Shagamu and saw the deceased putting on a military cap consequent upon which he got him arrested.

“On the way to Abeokuta, the vehicle they were traveling with developed a mechanical fault and while the officer was trying to rectify the fault, the arrested person jumped down from the vehicle to escape.

“In his bid to run across the road, an oncoming vehicle which is on high speed knocked him down and he died on the spot,” he added.

Meanwhile, the eyewitness account quoted by the Club, however, contradicted the report by the police.

The club quoted in parts: “The SARS officer stopped Tiyamiyu Kazeem insisting that he was a Yahoo Boy, he brought out his identity (ID) card to identify himself as a player of Remo Stars FC but the officer insisted on taking him to the nearest police station in Sagamu.

“Tiyamiyu and Sanni obliged, followed the SARS officers, only for them to notice that they were driving towards Sagamu-Abeokuta Expressway, then the guys questioned to know where the SARS officers were taking them to, but this prompted them to stop the car and push him (Tiyamiyu) out of the car, whereby an unknowing vehicle knocked him down.”

New Chinese Virus Not Yet A Global Health Emergency – WHO

Passengers who arrived on one of the last flights from the Chinese city of Wuhan walk through a health screening station at Narita airport in Chiba prefecture, outside Tokyo, on January 23, 2020, as countries screen for anyone showing symptoms of a SARS-like virus which has killed at least 17 people and infected over 500.  CHARLY TRIBALLEAU / AFP

 

A deadly virus outbreak that has prompted China to lock down some 20 million people does not yet constitute an international public health emergency, the World Health Organization determined Thursday.

“I am not declaring a public health emergency of international concern today,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters after a two-day emergency meeting in Geneva on the virus.

“This is an emergency in China, but it has not yet become a global health emergency,” he said.

AFP

Do You Know Which Countries Have Reported The Chinese Coronavirus?

A staff member checks the temperature of a guest entering the casino of the New Orient Landmark hotel in Macau on January 22, 2020, after the former Portuguese colony reported its first case of the new SARS-like virus that originated from Wuhan in China.  Anthony WALLACE / AFP

 

A SARS-like virus has claimed 17 lives since emerging on December 31 in a market in the Chinese city of Wuhan.

Here is a list of countries that have so far confirmed cases of the so-called coronavirus.

China 

As of Thursday, more than 570 people have been infected across China, most of them in Wuhan.

Hong Kong and British scientists have estimated that between 1,300 and 1,700 people in the city may have been infected.

— The city of Macau, a gambling hub hugely popular with mainland tourists, has confirmed two cases. The first was a 52-year-old businesswoman from Wuhan who arrived in Macau by high-speed rail on Sunday, via the neighbouring city of Zhuhai.

Hong Kong

As of Thursday, two people have tested positive in Hong Kong. Both had visited Wuhan in recent days and are being treated on isolation wards in the hospital.

Japan 

On January 16, Japan’s health ministry confirmed its first case — a man who had visited Wuhan and was hospitalised on January 10, four days after his return to Japan.

 Singapore 

Singapore on Thursday confirmed its first case — a 66-year-old man from Wuhan who arrived in Singapore with his family on Monday.

 South Korea 

South Korea reported its first case on January 20 — a 35-year-old woman who flew in from Wuhan.

 Taiwan 

On January 22, the self-ruled island of Taiwan, authorities confirmed a first case — a Taiwanese woman in her fifties, living in Wuhan, who returned to the island on Monday with symptoms including fever, coughing and a sore throat.

 Thailand 

Thailand has detected two cases — a 74-year-old Chinese woman, who is being treated at the hospital after presenting with symptoms at Thailand’s biggest airport Suvarnabhumi on January 13.

On January 8, a Chinese traveller was diagnosed with mild pneumonia that was later confirmed to have been caused by the coronavirus.

The United States 

On January 21, the United States announced its first case — a man in his 30s living near Seattle. Officials say he is in a good condition and approached authorities himself after reading about the virus in news reports.

 Vietnam 

Two cases have been confirmed so far in Vietnam — a Chinese man living in Ho Chi Minh City, who was infected by his father who travelled to Vietnam on January 13 from the Chinese city of Wuhan.

AFP

Singapore Confirms First Case Of Coronavirus

Medical staff members carry a patient into the Jinyintan hospital, where patients infected by a mysterious SARS-like virus are being treated, in Wuhan in China’s central Hubei province on January 18, 2020.  STR / AFP

 

Singapore Thursday confirmed its first case the new SARS-like virus which has killed 17 people in China and spread to multiple countries including the United States.

The Ministry of Health (MOH) said the patient was a 66-year-old man from Wuhan who arrived in Singapore with his family on Monday.

He was immediately isolated after arriving at a hospital with a fever and cough, and test results later confirmed he was infected with the coronavirus.

One of his travelling companions, a 37-year-old man from Wuhan, has also been admitted to hospital as a suspect case.

Prior to admission, they had stayed at a hotel on the resort island of Sentosa, the ministry said.

It added that Singapore was expecting more cases and alarms “given the high volume of international travel”.

Singapore’s Changi Airport started screening flights from Wuhan at the beginning of the month, and on Wednesday extended the checks to all flights from China.

The travel hub receives over 430 flights from China every week.

The virus has caused alarm in China and abroad because of its genetic similarities to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.

Singapore was among the hardest hit by SARS with 33 deaths.

AFP

SARS-Like Virus Death Toll Rises To 17

Medical staff members carry a patient into the Jinyintan hospital, where patients infected by a mysterious SARS-like virus are being treated, in Wuhan in China’s central Hubei province on January 18, 2020.

 

The death toll from a new SARS-like China virus that has infected hundreds rose to 17, authorities said on Wednesday.

Officials in Hubei, the central Chinese province whose capital is the epicentre of the epidemic, said at a televised news conference that the total number of people in the region infected with the new coronavirus was 444.

AFP

SARS-Like Virus: UK Steps Up Checks On Flights

Passengers wearing face masks arrive at the ferry terminal in Macau from Hong Kong on January 22, 2020, after China recently confirmed human-to-human transmission in the outbreak of the new SARS-like virus.  Anthony WALLACE / AFP

 

Britain on Wednesday enhanced monitoring of flights from the central China city at the heart of a new SARS-like virus that has killed nine people and spread to the United States.

Public Health England also raised the risk level of infection from “very low” to “low” because of the potential for human-to-human transmission.

“From today, enhanced monitoring will be in place for all direct flights from Wuhan to the UK,” the health service said in a statement.

Health teams will meet each of the three weekly direct flights from Wuhan to London “to provide advice and support to those that feel unwell”, it said.

Mandarin and Cantonese language-speaking staff will also be on hand. The statement said the measures could be expanded to “other Chinese departure points if necessary”.

The coronavirus has caused alarm because of its similarity to SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-03.

The new virus is known to have infected hundreds, although doctors fear its true scale could be higher.

The United States on Tuesday confirmed its first case of a person with the new virus. European countries have registered no cases to date.

London’s Heathrow airport, which is Europe’s busiest, said the stepped-up checks were “a precaution”.

“We would like to reassure passengers that the government assesses the risk of a traveller contracting coronavirus to be low,” a Heathrow spokesperson said.

Romanian health authorities on Wednesday also said they intend to introduce screening measures at airports.

Elsewhere in Europe, Italy’s health ministry said it would introduce temperature checks for passengers arriving on the next scheduled direct arrival from Wuhan to Rome’s Fiumicino airport.

The airport has three direct flights a week with Wuhan.

French Health Minister Agnes Buzyn said authorities were monitoring the situation but not following the lead of nations such as Russia, which has put up posters telling passengers what to do in case of symptoms.

Such measures are not recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO), Buzyn said, and are “not very effective”.

A WHO spokesman said Tuesday that “based on currently available information, there is no justification for any restriction of travel or trade”.

German health authorities said they had also refrained from taking any measures at airports.

AFP

Asia Steps Up Defence After SARS Virus Kills Six In China

Taiwan’s Center for Disease Control (CDC) personnel (R) using thermal scanners to screen passengers arriving on a flight from China’s Wuhan province, where a SARS-like virus was discovered and has since spread, at the Taoyuan International Airport.  Chen Chi-chuan / AFP

 

Asian countries on Tuesday ramped up measures to block the spread of a new virus as the death toll in China rose to six and the number of cases jumped to almost 300, raising concerns in the middle of a major holiday travel rush.

From Australia to Thailand and as far as Nepal, nations stepped up fever checks of passengers at airports to detect the SARS-like coronavirus, which first emerged in the central Chinese city of Wuhan.

Fears of a bigger outbreak rose after a prominent expert from China’s National Health Commission confirmed late Monday that the virus can be passed between people.

Authorities previously said there was no obvious evidence of person-to-person transmission and animals were suspected to be the source, as a seafood market where live animals were sold in Wuhan was identified as the centre of the outbreak.

The confirmation of human transmission comes as hundreds of millions of people are crisscrossing China in packed buses, trains and planes this week to celebrate the Lunar New Year with relatives.

Almost 80 new cases have been confirmed, bringing the total number of people hit by the virus in China to 291, with the vast majority in Hubei, the province where Wuhan lies, and others in Beijing, Shanghai and Guangdong, according to the National Health Commission. State media said one case was found in Zhejiang province.

 Taiwan’s Center for Disease Control (CDC) personnel using thermal scanners to screen passengers arriving on a flight from China’s Wuhan province, where a SARS-like virus was discovered and has since spread, at the Taoyuan International Airport.  Chen Chi-chuan / AFP

Wuhan mayor Zhou Xianwang told state broadcaster CCTV that the death toll had risen from four to six.

China said it would attend a special World Health Organization meeting on Wednesday which will determine whether to declare a rare global public health emergency over the disease, which was detected in Thailand, Japan and South Korea among four people who had visited Wuhan.

The coronavirus has caused alarm because of its genetic similarities to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.

Fever checks 

At four airports in Thailand, authorities introduced mandatory thermal scans of passengers arriving from high-risk areas of China. Anyone exhibiting signs of fever will be quarantined for 24 hours for monitoring.

Around 1,300 passengers are expected each day in Thailand from Wuhan over Chinese New Year, which starts on Friday.

In Hong Kong, where memories of SARS still haunt the city, authorities said they were on “extreme high alert”, with passengers from Wuhan required to fill out health declarations and face possible jail time if they do not declare symptoms.

“We are … preparing for the worst. We have not lowered our guard,” Hong Kong’s number two leader, Chief Secretary Matthew Cheung, told reporters.

Taiwan went onto its second-highest alert level for those travelling to and from Wuhan, advising visitors to avoid visiting any live poultry markets while screening has been stepped up at airports.

Enhanced screening measures have also been set up at airports in Australia, Bangladesh, Nepal, Singapore, and the United States.

A man showing symptoms of the disease who had travelled to Wuhan has been put in isolation in Australia as health officials await test results, authorities said Tuesday.

In China, the government announced Tuesday it was classifying the outbreak in the same category as SARS, meaning compulsory isolation for those diagnosed with the disease and the potential to implement quarantine measures on travel.

In Wuhan, authorities banned tour groups and police were conducting spot checks for live poultry or wild animals in vehicles leaving and entering the city, state media said.

Passengers were being screened for fever at the airport, railway stations and bus terminals. Those with fevers would be registered, handed masks and advised to see a doctor, and they would not have to pay to change their tickets.

WHO meeting 

Zhong Nanshan, a renowned scientist at the National Health Commission, raised the alarm when he said on Monday that patients can contract the virus without having visited Wuhan, though he added that it was milder than SARS.

The WHO had previously identified animals as the likely primary source, but had warned of “some limited human-to-human transmission”.

Doctors at the University of Hong Kong released a study on Tuesday estimating that there have been 1,343 cases of the new virus in Wuhan. Scientists at Imperial College in London said last week the number was likely closer to 1,700.

The WHO has only called a global public health emergency a handful of times, including during the H1N1 — or swine flu — pandemic of 2009 and the Ebola epidemic that devastated parts of West Africa from 2014 to 2016.

The Communist government was accused of covering up the SARS outbreak in 2003 but some foreign experts have praised the swift release of information on this new virus.

“China is willing to continue to deepen international cooperation, join hands with the international community to respond to the epidemic, and jointly maintain regional and global health security,” foreign ministry spokesman Geng Shuang told reporters.

AFP

China Confirms Death Of Six In SARS Virus

 

The death toll from a new China virus that is transmissible between humans rose to six, the mayor of Wuhan said in an interview with state broadcaster CCTV Tuesday.

According to Zhou Xianwang, the central Chinese city — believed to be the epicentre of the epidemic — has seen a total of 258 cases, including 227 patients who are still receiving medical treatment.

AFP

Number Of Confirmed SARS Virus Cases Jumps To Nearly 300 In China

People wearing protective masks are seen in front of the Huashan Hospital in Shanghai on January 21, 2020.  HECTOR RETAMAL / AFP

 

The number of people in China infected by a new SARS-like virus jumped to 291 on Tuesday, according to authorities.

There have been nearly 80 new confirmed cases of the virus that has so far killed four people, with over 900 still under medical observation, said the National Health Commission.

READ ALSO: Scientists Raise Alarm Over China Virus, As Countries Take Measures

China Records 17 New Cases Of Deadly SARS Virus

edical staff members carry a patient into the Jinyintan hospital, where patients infected by a mysterious SARS-like virus are being treated, in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province on January 18, 2020. STR / AFP
edical staff members carry a patient into the Jinyintan hospital, where patients infected by a mysterious SARS-like virus are being treated, in Wuhan in China’s central Hubei province on January 18, 2020. STR / AFP

 

China reported 17 new cases of the mysterious SARS-like virus on Sunday, including three people in serious condition, heightening fears ahead of China’s Lunar New Year holiday when hundreds of millions of people move around the country.

The new coronavirus strain has caused alarm because of its connection to Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.

Of the 17 new cases in the central city of Wuhan — believed to be the epicentre of the outbreak — three were described as “severe”, of which two patients were too critical to be moved, authorities said.

Those infected range from 30 to 79 years old.

The virus has now infected 62 people in Wuhan, city authorities said, with eight in a severe condition, 19 recovered and discharged from hospital, and the rest in isolation receiving treatment.

Two people have died so far from the virus, including a 69-year-old man on Wednesday after the disease caused pulmonary tuberculosis and damaged multiple organ functions.

Authorities said they had begun “optimised” testing of pneumonia cases across the city to identify those infected, and would begin “detection work… towards suspected cases in the city” as a next step, as well as carrying out “sampling tests”.

Scientists with the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College in London warned in a paper published Friday that the number of cases in the city was likely to be closer to 1,700, much higher than the number officially identified.

Authorities said Sunday that some of the cases had “no history of contact” with the seafood market believed to be the centre of the outbreak.

No human-to-human transmission has been confirmed so far, but Wuhan’s health commission has previously said the possibility “cannot be excluded”.

Three cases have also been reported overseas — two in Thailand and one in Japan.

Rumour quashing

Though China has not yet reported cases outside of Wuhan, discussion about the coronavirus spreading to other Chinese cities has swelled on social media.

On Sunday evening there were more than 400 million views of the hashtag “Shanghai pneumonia” on Weibo, China’s Twitter-like social media site, while “Shenzhen pneumonia” garnered at least 340 million views.

China’s centre for disease control moved to quash speculation about the mysterious disease on Saturday, publishing a flyer that dismissed “five big rumours”.

One of them included claims about the coronavirus spreading, which China’s disease control authority dismissed by saying all cases were being treated in Wuhan.

A hospital in Guangzhou, a city in southern China, also moved to dispel rumours about suspected cases of the Wuhan pneumonia, reported state-run Global Times on Sunday.

The original post, which was published through the hospital’s official Weibo account on Saturday, has since been deleted.

Screening measures 

Although there has been no official announcement of screening measures on the mainland, Wuhan deputy mayor Chen Xiexin said on state broadcaster CCTV that infrared thermometers had been installed at airports, railway stations and coach stations across the city.

Chen said passengers with fevers were being registered, given masks and taken to medical institutions. Nearly 300,000 body temperature tests had been carried out, according to CCTV.

Authorities in Hong Kong have stepped up detection measures, including rigorous temperature checkpoints for inbound travellers from the Chinese mainland.

The US said from Friday it would begin screening direct flights arriving from Wuhan at San Francisco airport and New York’s JFK, as well as Los Angeles, where many flights connect.

Thailand said it was already screening passengers arriving in Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Phuket, and would soon introduce similar controls in the beach resort of Krabi.

Wuhan is a city of 11 million inhabitants that serves as a major transport hub, including during the annual Lunar New Year holiday when hundreds of millions of Chinese people travel across the country to visit family.

AFP

Scientists Raise Alarm Over China Virus, As Countries Take Measures

edical staff members carry a patient into the Jinyintan hospital, where patients infected by a mysterious SARS-like virus are being treated, in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province on January 18, 2020. STR / AFP
Medical staff members carry a patient into the Jinyintan hospital, where patients infected by a mysterious SARS-like virus are being treated, in Wuhan in China’s central Hubei province on January 18, 2020. STR / AFP

 

The true scale of the outbreak of a mysterious SARS-like virus in China is likely far bigger than officially reported, scientists have warned, as countries ramp up measures to prevent the disease from spreading.

Fears that the virus will spread are growing ahead of the Lunar New Year holiday, when hundreds of millions of Chinese move around the country and many others host or visit extended family members living overseas.

Authorities in China say two people have died and at least 45 have been infected, with the outbreak centred around a seafood market in the central city of Wuhan, a city of 11 million inhabitants that serves as a major transport hub.

READ ALSO: China Records Second Death From SARS-Linked Virus

But a paper published Friday by scientists with the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis at Imperial College in London said the number of cases in the city was likely closer to 1,700.

The researchers said their estimate was largely based on the fact that cases had been reported overseas –- two in Thailand and one in Japan.

The virus — a new strain of coronavirus that humans can contract — has caused alarm because of its connection to SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which killed nearly 650 people across mainland China and Hong Kong in 2002-2003.

China has not announced any travel restrictions, but authorities in Hong Kong have already stepped up detection measures, including rigorous temperature checkpoints for inbound travellers from the Chinese mainland.

The US said from Friday it would begin screening flights arriving from Wuhan at San Francisco airport and New York’s JFK — which both receive direct flights — as well as Los Angeles, where many flights connect.

And Thailand said it was already screening passengers arriving in Bangkok, Chiang Mai and Phuket and would soon introduce similar controls in the beach resort of Krabi.

Two deaths

No human-to-human transmission has been confirmed so far, but Wuhan’s health commission has said the possibility “cannot be excluded”.

A World Health Organization doctor said it would not be surprising if there was “some limited human-to-human transmission, especially among families who have close contact with one another”.

Scientists with the MRC Centre for Global Infectious Disease Analysis — which advises bodies including the World Health Organization — said they estimated a “total of 1,723” people in Wuhan would have been infected as of January 12.

“For Wuhan to have exported three cases to other countries would imply there would have to be many more cases than have been reported,” Professor Neil Ferguson, one of the authors of the report, told the BBC.

“I am substantially more concerned than I was a week ago,” he said, while adding that it was “too early to be alarmist”.

“People should be considering the possibility of substantial human-to-human transmission more seriously than they have so far,” he continued, saying it was “unlikely” that animal exposure was the sole source of infection.

Local authorities in Wuhan said a 69-year-old man died on Wednesday, becoming the second fatal case, with the disease-causing pulmonary tuberculosis and damage to multiple organ functions.

After the death was reported, online discussion spread in China over the severity of the Wuhan coronavirus — and how much information the government may be hiding from the public.

Several complained about censorship of online posts, while others made comparisons to 2003, when Beijing drew criticism from the WHO for underreporting the number of SARS cases.

“It’s so strange,” wrote a web user on the social media platform Weibo, citing the overseas cases in Japan and Thailand. “They all have Wuhan pneumonia cases but (in China) we don’t have any infections outside of Wuhan — is that scientific?”

 

AFP

US To Screen Passengers For China Mystery Virus

A US healthcare company/AFP

 

US authorities will begin screening passengers Friday arriving on direct or connecting flights from a Chinese city at the heart of a mysterious SARS-like virus responsible for two deaths.

Travelers from Wuhan to the United States will undergo entry screening for symptoms associated with the new coronavirus at three airports: San Francisco, New York’s JFK and Los Angeles.

China has now reported 45 cases linked to the virus, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) official Nancy Messonnier told reporters in a press call, most linked to seafood and live animal market in Wuhan, while two cases have been found in Thailand and one in Japan.

The CDC said that based on current information, the risk to Americans from the virus, known by its technical name 2019-nCoV, is currently deemed low. Nevertheless, it was enhancing precautionary measures.

The CDC will deploy 100 additional staff to the three airports, with incoming passengers asked to fill out a questionnaire and submit to a temperature check.

Those who show possible signs will be shifted to another facility for additional screening and a rapid diagnostic test.

Messonnier said that this test would currently take around a day, “but it’s going to get rapidly faster” as the diagnostic tool improves.

The UN’s health agency says that the outbreak of the disease comes from a never-before-seen strain belonging to a broad family of viruses ranging from the common cold to more serious illnesses such as SARS.

According to Arnaud Fontanet, head of Paris’ Institut Pasteur department of epidemiology, the new strain is the seventh known type of coronavirus that humans can contract.

The outbreak has caused alarm because of the link with SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome), which killed 349 people in mainland China and another 299 in Hong Kong in 2002-2003.

Fontanet added that the coronavirus appears to be “weaker” than SARS in its current form, but cautioned that it could mutate into a more virulent strain.