Nigeria Commits To Reducing Number Of Out-Of-School Children

Nigeria On Out Of School ChildrenThe Federal Government says Nigeria is committed to reducing the number of out of school children by the year 2030.

The declaration follows prediction by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) that Nigeria may not achieve the Sustainable Development Goal for education by 2030.

This was revealed in a report launched on Monday in Abuja by the Minister of Education, Mr Adamu Adamu, at a gathering of experts, government officials and other key players in the education sector.

The Global Education Monitoring Report for 2016, prepared by UNESCO, stated that Nigeria might not achieve universal primary education until 2070.

The report examined how countries would achieve the target and also checked the present status of countries on education globally and where they would be by 2030.

The Director at UNESCO’s Abuja Regional Office, Benoit Sossou, called for increased access to quality basic education as a way of addressing the problem.

Mr Adamu, however, reaffirmed that the Federal Government was committed to ensuring Nigeria meets the 2030 target by reducing the number of out of school children.

On his part, the Minister of State for Education, Professor Anthony Anwukiah, also insisted that the 2030 education agenda is achievable with the concerted efforts of all Nigerians.

The Universal Basic Education Commission (UBEC) had in August expressed worry over the number of out of school children in Nigeria.

The Executive Secretary of UBEC, Dr. Hamid Bobboyi, raised the concern at a meeting with Heads of State Universal Basic Commissions across the 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory.

He said that increasing the number of children in schools was a priority for the Federal Government, stressing that there was no justification for any child not to be enrolled into the basic education scheme.

UBEC Boss Decries Number Of Out Of School Children

UBEC Decries Number Of Out Of School ChildrenThe Universal Basic Education Commission (UBEC) has expressed worry over the number of out of school children in Nigeria.

The Executive Secretary of UBEC, Dr. Hamid Bobboyi, raised the concern on Wednesday at a meeting with Heads of State Universal Basic Commissions across the 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory.

He stressed that increasing the number of children in schools was a priority for the Federal Government.

Dr. Bobboyi stated that there was no justification for any child not to be enrolled into Nigeria’s basic education scheme.

He called on state governments to bridge the gap by ensuring the enrollment of children, adding that the basic education funds must be used judiciously.

Abia Govt. Partners Australian Investors On Education

Abia, EducationThe Abia State government has partnered private investors from Australia to train primary school teachers across the three senatorial zones of the state.

This was disclosed to reporters on Thursday at the Government House in Umuahia, the Abia State’s capital in southeast Nigeria after a private audience between the foreigners and Governor Okezie Ikpeazu.

The leader of the team, Vivian Peters, and her group promised to provide expertise free of charge in line with the global standard in education.

Some Australian educationists, Alder Wood and Sakira Suma, also said that the exercise would be carried out in accordance with the Abia State government’s policy on educational development.

The training, which is expected to kick off immediately would be on classroom management and teachers-students relationship amongst others.

Boko Haram Militants Kill 29 Students, Teacher in Yobe School Attack

Suspected members of the Boko Haram sect killed 29 students and a teacher in a boarding school in the northeast Nigerian town of Potiskum on Saturday, a police source said.

The attack is a further sign that the extremist sect remains a threat to Nigeria despite a crackdown on it.

The attackers set fire to buildings and shot pupils as they tried to flee, the source said. A hospital was treating several of the students for burns, he added.

It was the deadliest of three attacks on schools since the military launched an offensive in May to try to crush Boko Haram, whose nickname translates as “Western education is sinful” in the northern Hausa language.

Under the leadership of fiery militant Abubakar Shekau, Boko Haram rejects all Western cultural influences like modern schooling and yearns for the days when much of West Africa was ruled by great Islamic empires thriving off trans-Saharan trade.

Potiskum is in Yobe state, one of three covered by a state of emergency declared by President Goodluck Jonathan in May, when he ordered extra troops into the region to try to quell a rebellion seen as Nigeria’s biggest security headache.

The police source responded by email as the mobile phone network was cut to much of the northeast as part of the state of emergency.

“We are really terrified … Everyone fear these school attacks are going to continue and even spread to other towns,” Bala Husseini, a resident of Potiskum who himself has two children not yet of school age, said in an emailed message.

In a separate attack hundreds of miles away in the town of Karim Lamido, Taraba state, suspected Islamist gunmen fired on a police station and a branch of First Bank, killing three policemen. A police official said the attackers blew up the bank’s vault with dynamite and made off with the cash.

Shifting tactics

The hit-and-run strikes have raised fears the 7-week-old military offensive has pushed the insurgents fighting for a breakaway Islamic state into hiding, but failed to stop them launching devastating attacks.

Taraba, which has been only rarely attacked by the sect, is not covered by the military offensive, so the heist there may be a sign the assault has pushed the militants into other areas.

Suspected Islamist militants opened fire on a school in Nigeria’s northeastern city of Maiduguri last month, killing nine students, and a similar attack on a school in the city of Damaturu killed seven just days earlier.

Shifting targets of its attack as it comes under pressure has been a consistent Boko Haram tactic since the sect launched an uprising in 2009, when hundreds of members, including founder Mohammed Yusuf, were killed by security forces.

Nigerian forces say their offensive has enabled them to wrest back control of the remote northeast from Boko Haram, destroy key bases and arrest scores of suspects.

But critics say no amount of force can destroy what is in part a grassroots movement feeding off discontent at bad governance and widening inequalities between a depressed north and an economically booming south.

Jonathan’s administration has offered an amnesty and peace talks to members who renounce violence, but their leader Shekau has repeatedly rejected any negotiations.

Dickson Inaugurates Niger Delta University Governing Council

To reaffirm his commitment to the rapid growth of education in Bayelsa State, Governor Seriake Dickson on Tuesday inaugurated the Governing council of the State owned Niger Delta University.

While inaugurating the Chairman and members of the council, Mr Dickson urged them to ensure that the operational system of the institution is overhauled for better output.

He added that the University is expected to serve the state, while also solving fundamental issues in the nation.

Before inaugurating the governing council, Mr Dickson took time out to pay respect and acknowledge the contributions of late Chief Melford Okilo and Chief Diepreye Alamieseigha both former Governors of Rivers and Bayelsa State respectively to educational development in the State.

Inaugurating the chairman of the council who also serves as the Pro-Chancellor of the University and the other members, the governor tasked the team to make sure quality education is enthroned in the institution.

Responding to the call to serve the Chairman of the council, Turner Isoun, while appreciating the governor, called for knowledge based economy.