×

Again, Zamfara Shuts Down 11 Cattle Markets Over Banditry

Those of Sabon Birnin Dan Ali, Kokiya, Chigama and Nasarawar Godel markets all in Birnin Magaji local government were also not left out.


A file photo of Zamfara State Governor Dauda Lawal. (Photo: Facebook/Dauda Lawal)

 

Zamfara State Government has again closed eleven cattle markets in some parts of the state until further notice.

This was disclosed in a statement on Wednesday by the state’s Commissioner for Information, Munnir Haidara, saying the decision followed security reports that the bandits were using the markets to sell off their rustled cows.

The affected markets according to Haidara are Tsafe and Bilbis markets in Tsafe local government, Jangebe market in Talata-Mafara local government and Wuya market in Anka local government.

READ ALSO: ‘Many Feared Killed’ In Rivers Crude Oil Explosion

Others are Magamin Diddi market in Maradun Local government, Galadi market in Shinkafi local government, Mada market in Gusau local government and Sabon Birnin Danali in Birnin Magaji local government.

Those of Sabon Birnin Dan Ali, Kokiya, Chigama and Nasarawar Godel markets all in Birnin Magaji local government were also not left out.

“The state government finds it absolutely necessary to close down these markets due to security reports that the bandits are conniving with some unscrupulous elements to sell off their rustled cows in those markets,” he stated.

He said that the state government has directed the security agencies to ensure compliance and arrest any person who violated the order.

“The security personnel have since been directed to arrest any person found in these affected markets.”

Haidara called on the people of the state to abide by the order and cooperate with the state government in its efforts to rid the state of banditry activities.

Northwest and central Nigeria have been long terrorised by bandit militias operating from bases deep in forests and raiding villages to loot and kidnap residents for ransom.

A jihadist conflict has raged in northeastern Nigeria since 2009, killing tens of thousands of people and displacing around two million, as Boko Haram battles for supremacy with rivals linked to the Islamic State group.

President Bola Ahmed Tinubu, a former Lagos governor elected in February in a highly contested ballot, has promised to attract more investment to Africa’s largest economy and most populous country in a bid to tackle its persistent security challenges.