Zamfara Governor Commiserates With Victims Of Bandit Attack

Zamfara State Governor, Bello Matawalle

 

Zamfara State Governor, Bello Matawalle has commiserated with the victims of bandits attack in Gidan Goga village in the Maradun Local Government Area of the state.

The governor’s condolence message was contained in a statement issued on Friday by his media aide, Zailani Bappa.

While sympathising with those who underwent the trauma as well, the governor assured that the recent attacks is “not a security lapse but a momentary hiccup that will not be allowed to last.”

READ ALSO: Four Killed, Others Injured As Bandits Attack Zamfara Community

To the governor,  the attack exposes the desperation of the bandits who he said are experiencing heavy pressure from the offensive launched by security operatives in recent times.

“I want to assure our law obedient citizens of Zamfara State that the experience we are undergoing will not last. The bandits are experiencing our sustained pressure which they react through cowardly and desperate attacks on innocent citizens,” the governor was quoted as saying.

“However, we shall not rest on our oars until we find a lasting solution to the emergence of violence in our communities.

“We implore for maximum co-operation from the communities in terms of swift intelligence reports.”

His reaction comes hours after four persons were killed and some others injured in the fresh attack by suspected bandits.

FG does not back U.S push to list Boko Haram among foreign terrorist organisation

The Minister of Defence, Bello Mohammed on Wednesday said that the Federal government does not support the move by a U.S congress to designate extremist group, Boko Haram a “foreign terrorist organisation” because this could hamper dialogue with the sect.

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Boko Haram, which in the Hausa language of northern Nigeria means “Western education is sinful,” is loosely modelled on the Taliban movement in Afghanistan.

The Minister said this while responding to questions from a Reuters correspondent on the sideline of a meeting between South Africa and Nigeria in Cape Town.

“We are looking at a dialogue to establish the grievances of the Boko Haram. I think the attempt to declare them an international terrorist organization will not be helpful,” he said.

The Federal Government held indirect talks with Boko Haram in March, but discussions broke down quickly and the militant group said it could not trust the government. It is unclear whether government efforts to resume links have borne fruit since.

Pressure has been growing on the Obama administration to formally designate Boko Haram a “foreign terrorist organisation.”

Scott Brown, a Republican senator from Massachusetts, wrote to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton late last week, urging her to designate the group as a terrorist organization.

U.S. Representatives Peter King and Patrick Meehan, chairmen of the House Homeland Security Committee and its counterterrorism subcommittee, released a letter they sent to Clinton suggesting the administration was moving too slowly.

Boko Haram, which means “western education is sinful”, has claimed responsibility for months of attacks in northern Nigeria. Its attacks have mainly targeted the police, churches and outdoor drinking areas.

“Boko Haram is not operating in America and America is not operating in Nigeria,” said Mohammed. “They are not involved in our internal security operations, so I don’t think it would be of much significance really in that respect. But we don’t support it.”