Android-powered desktop unveiled by Motorola

Phone-making company, Motorola has introduced new desktop computer powered by Android which also offers cloud-based services provided by Wasu, including games, high-definition television and movies and web browsing.

A partnership agreement was done between Motorola Mobility and Wasu Digital a cable and telecommunications service provider to launch a new android powered computer “HMC3260″”.

The HMC3260, which is dubbed as CloudBroadBand, features an 8.5 inch LED touchscreen, Android 2.3.4 operating system and broadband internet access through EuroDOCSIS.

It also features 1 GB DDR RAM, 4 GB NAND flash memory, LAN and Freescale i.MX53 ARM Cortex A8 1GHz.

With the new CloudBroadBand, Wasu’s customers can access to a host of cloud entertainment services such as an on-demand high-definition media, games, applications and storage space.

Motorola Home Division Asia vice president and regional general manager Kevin Keefe said the Motorola HMC3260 provides subscribers with a fast broadband connection and also offers cloud-based services provided by Wasu, including games, high-definition television and movies, web browsing and more.

The powerful touchscreen interface capitalizes on the power and flexibility of Android to enable Wasu to differentiate itself from operators who only offer a pipeline for data.

Intel unveils 27-inch all-in-on desktop tablet

It was called a developers’ conference by Intel and it was hosted in San Francisco little did the computer world know that it was about to be bombarded with a new invention by the chip-making company as it was used as a medium to unveil a desktop computer prototype that has a display that can double as a 27-inch tablet with a four-hour battery life.

Slate producers like Samsung, with its Galaxy Note II, and Apple, with its expected iPad Mini, are down-sizing the tablet’s classic 10-inch form factor. But Intel must think that there’s room to push the form at the other end of things.

Called the Adaptive All-In-One, the 2.5-inch thick unit has 1080p HD resolution and has the guts of a personal computer, including optical drive, input/output ports and high-performance graphics processor. On the desktop, it plugs into a dock that charges its battery and connects it to peripherals such as a keyboard and mouse. Its touchscreen can be used both on and off the dock.

The display panel weighs 14 pounds. That may have been portable in the days of the Osborne I, but it’s not very portable by today’s standards. Intel recognizes that deficiency and is working with screen and battery manufacturers to slim down the units.

All-In-One computers aren’t anything new, and in recent times they’ve been gaining popularity. Apple has been flogging the form for years with its iMac line and just this week HP introduced a slick new addition to the category, the SpectreONE.

Some tablet makers have also dipped their toes in the detachable screen waters. For example, Asus’ Transformer tablet line has a dock that transforms the slates into a mini-laptop.

With ideas like the Adaptive All-In-One, Intel hopes to pump some excitement into a PC market that seems to get more moribund with each passing quarter. For the quarter ending in June, for instance, Gartner reported that PC shipments declined 5.7 per cent. IDC’s estimates for the period were even worse: a 10.6 per cent drop.

The traditional desktop is a box that’s beige, black, or brown and most likely it’s under the desk but now, the adaptive all-in-one in terms of design will surely change the way that people interact with their desktop PCs.

Mobile world our biggest challenge – Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook CEO, Mark Zuckerberg confessed that the greatest challenge the social network is presently facing is its adaptation into the mobile world.

He opened up the discussion at the media conference of Allen & co. which took place at sun Valley in Idaho.

Fitting the 990 million fan base membership social network into al mobile devices is proving to be the toughest task presently hindering his job as there’s a difference between desktop and mobile platforms. He also delved into the workability of the social network

Since the company went public in mid-May, Facebook has been having a tough time, and it still hasn’t climbed back to its $38 IPO price. Facebook’s stock fell below $$26 at one point and since then it’s generally stayed around the $30 mark.

The company’s struggles in the mobile realm has been well documented since Facebook filed documents with the SEC as it prepared to go public and listed mobile as one of its obstacles.

After that time, though, the company has made efforts to improve in the area. Facebook has made purchasing mobile ads easier, released a duo of apps this summer and purchased Instagram for $1 billion in April.

Meanwhile, for Facebook rival Twitter, the story is precisely the opposite as the company has actually been making more money from mobile on some days.

CEO; David Costolo admitted that he’s been all smiles to the bank these days.