SERAP Urges Osinbajo To Warn Trump Against Harassment Of Nigerians

Alleged Corruption: SERAP Writes Buhari Over SGF's CaseThe Socio-Economic Rights and Accountability Project (SERAP), has urged the Acting President, Professor Yemi Osinbajo, to “tell the U.S President, Donald Trump, in no uncertain terms that Nigeria would not tolerate any harassment and unfair treatment of her citizens with valid multiple-entry U.S visas at U.S airports.”

This was revealed in a statement released on Tuesday and signed by its Executive Director, Adetokunbo Mumuni.

It follows a disclosure by the Senior Special Assistant to the President on Foreign Affairs, Abike Dabiri-Erewa, that in the last few weeks, the office has received a few cases of Nigerians with valid multiple-entry U.S visas being denied entry and sent back to Nigeria.

According to Mrs Dabiri -Erewa, such affected persons were sent back immediately on the next available flight and their visas were cancelled.

SERAP further said: “The Nigerian government must stand up to Trump and defend Nigerians’ internationally recognised right to freedom of movement just as the Iraqi Prime Minister, Haider Al-Abadi did for his own citizens.

“The Iraqi leader ensured that his country was taken off the obnoxious executive order list. Osinbajo must now show the leadership needed to defend the country’s citizens who are facing unfair treatment in the hands of U.S immigration officers.

“The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) guarantees liberty of movement, and provides in article 13 that, “everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each state.

“2. Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country. The declaration also guarantees the right of everyone including Nigerians to a social and international order in which the rights and freedoms set forth in the declaration can be fully realized.”

“SERAP notes that Eleanor Roosevelt, late wife of American President, Franklin D. Roosevelt, chaired the UDHR drafting committee.

“On the basis of the UDHR, persons are entitled to move from one place to another and to establish themselves in a place of their choice. The enjoyment of this right must not be made dependent on any particular purpose or reason for the person wanting to move or to stay in a place. Any restrictions must be in conformity with international standards.

“The Nigerian authorities must ensure that Nigerians’ liberty of movement is protected from interference by the trump government.

“The authorities should carefully study the revised executive order and take proactive measures to prevent any harassment and unfair treatment of Nigerians in the hands of U.S immigration officers.”

UN Concerned About Lake Chad Basin Food Crisis

United Nations, UN, Lake Chad Basin, FoodThe United Nations has said that at least nine million people are in urgent need of aid in Nigeria’s northeast and neighbouring countries.

The UN Regional Humanitarian Coordinator, Toby Lanzer, said at least $559 million would be needed in the next four months to ease the crisis in Nigeria, Niger, Cameroon and Chad.

He said more than six million people were “severely food insecure” with 568,000 children acutely malnourished adding that the UN has appealed to Britain and other western governments for help.

Mr Lanzer said at the Chatham House in London: “With population growth of speed and nature, in an area where everyone is already poor, the environment is incredibly stressed.

“There is a never-ending stream of heavier violence, it is only natural to conclude that more people will migrate,” he said.

The Heads of State of the Lake Chad Basin and donor countries would meet on the margins of the annual United Nations General Assembly holding next week.

Meanwhile, the US President, Barack Obama, would meet with President Muhammadu Buhari on the sidelines of the Assembly.

US Deputy National Security Adviser, Ben Rhodes, disclosed that President Obama would hold separate sessions with the Nigerian President, Iraqi Prime Minister, Haider Al-Abadi and Colombian President, Juan Manuel Santos.

Obama To Meet Buhari, Others At UN Assembly

Barrack Obama, Muhammadu Buhari, UN General AssemblyThe President of the United States, Barack Obama, will meet with Nigeria’s President, Muhammadu Buhari, the leaders of Iraq and Colombia on the sidelines of the annual United Nations General Assembly holding next week.

The White House Deputy National Security Adviser, Ben Rhodes, explained that President Obama would hold separate sessions with the Nigerian President, Iraqi Prime Minister, Haider Al-Abadi and Colombian President, Juan Manuel Santos.

President Buhari would participate in the five-day, 71st session of the General Assembly where he would deliver Nigeria’s statement at the opening of the general debate.

The theme of this year’s debate is “The Sustainable Development Goals: A Universal Push To Transform Our World”.

Attack On US President

The proposed meeting comes as President Obama cancelled a meeting with controversial Philippine President, Rodrigo Duterte, who earlier called him a “son of a whore”.

Mr Duterte was responding to the US President’s promise to raise the issue of drug-related and extra-judicial killings in the Philippines at their meeting.

US aides later confirmed Mr Obama would meet South Korea’s President instead.

In reply, Mr Duterte issued a statement saying he regretted that the comment came across as a personal attack on the US President.

This is not the first time President Duterte has made inflammatory statements against prominent figures as he had attacked Pope Francis, the US Secretary of State, John Kerry and the US Ambassador to the Philippines in recent times.

Iraq To Intervene In Iran/Saudi Row         

 iraqIraq has sent its foreign minister to Tehran with an offer to mediate in an escalating feud between Saudi Arabia and Iran, reflecting Baghdad’s fears that new sectarian conflict could undo its campaign against Islamic State.

On arrival in Iran, the Iraq Foreign Minister told journalists his country has solid relations with Iran and Saudi Arabia and therefore cannot stay silent in the crisis.

Saudi Arabia’s execution of Shi’ite cleric on Saturday has inflamed sectarian anger across the Middle East, infuriating Iran.

Powerful Iran-backed Shi’ite militia called on Iraqi Prime Minister, Haidar Al-Abadi on Wednesday to shut a Saudi embassy that reopened only last month after decades of strained ties.

Saudi Arabia cut diplomatic ties with Iran on Sunday after protesters hit the Saudi embassy in Tehran.

Both countries are major rivals in the Middle East and back opposing sides in the conflicts in Syria and Yemen.

There has been immediate reaction from Saudi Arabia to the Iraqi mediation offer.

Iraqi Prime Minister Accuses President Of Violating Constitution

 IraqiIraqi Prime Minister Nouri Al-Maliki, has indicated that he will not give in to the pressure to drop his bid for a third term and accuses the President of violating the constitution in a tough televised speech likely to deepen political tensions as a Sunni insurgency rages.

The Prime Minister, seen as an authoritarian and sectarian leader, accused Iraq’s Kurdish President, Fouad Massoum, of violating the constitution by failing to meet a deadline for Iraq’s biggest political bloc to nominate a prime minister.

A dispute over which bloc won the most seats during the election has complicated efforts to form a new government in Iraq, a major oil exporter.

Nouri Al-Maliki, who has served in a caretaker capacity since an inconclusive election in April, has defied calls by Sunnis, Kurds, some fellow Shi’ite and regional power broker, to step aside for a less polarizing figure who can unite Iraqis against Islamic state militants.

Meanwhile U.S. Secretary of  State, John Kerry, insisted that the formation of an Iraqi government is critical for stability and urged the Prime Minister, Nouri Al-Maliki not to stoke political tensions.

The U.S President, Barack Obama, has urged Iraqi political leaders to bury their sectarian differences and form a more inclusive government that can unite Iraqis against Islamic state militants.

Also the United States has carried out three consecutive days of air strikes over Iraq, stepping up assistance to Kurdish forces to counter the advance of Islamic militants in the north of the country.

Maliki, who has been premier since 2006, has alienated some allies, including the United States, who blame him for failing to forge consensus and fueling sectarian violence that is breaking Iraq apart.