Uganda Releases Prominent Academic Accused Of ‘Espionage’

A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni
A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni

 

 

A prominent Ugandan academic arrested on accusations of spying for regional rival Rwanda has been released following an intervention by President Yoweri Museveni, a businessman familiar with the case said on Saturday.

Lawrence Muganga, 45, vice-chancellor of the private Victoria University, was arrested on Thursday by joint security forces for suspected “espionage and illegal stay”, according to a military spokeswoman.

Video from university security cameras posted online showed Muganga being taken in broad daylight from his Kampala office by armed plain clothes men and uniformed soldiers and put into a van known as a “drone”, which is associated with abductions of government opponents.

Frank Gashumba, a friend of Muganga and one of Uganda’s most prominent businessmen, told AFP that the academic had been freed on Friday after he (Gashumba) raised the case with Museveni.

There was no immediate confirmation from the government of his release.

Gashumba said Muganga, who is of Rwandan ethnicity, was taken to Uganda’s military intelligence agency headquarters where he was questioned about alleged spying for Kigali.

Gashumba told AFP he secured a meeting with Museveni who he said was “shocked” by Muganga’s arrest and ordered his immediate release and the dropping of all charges.

“I want to thank each and everyone out there for your peace, your support, your activism,” Muganga said after his release, according to a video posted on Gashumba’s Facebook page.

Uganda Welcomes First Group Of Afghan Refugees


PIERRE-PHILIPPE MARCOU / AFP

 

A flight carrying Afghan evacuees fleeing the Taliban takeover of their country touched down early Wednesday in Uganda where they will be given temporary refuge, government officials said.

The foreign ministry said a charter flight carrying 51 Afghans — including men, women and children — landed in the lakeside city of Entebbe, where they were whisked to hotels in a convoy of buses.

More evacuees from Afghanistan are expected to arrive at a later time in Uganda from the war-torn country, the ministry said.

It said it followed a request from the US government to temporarily host “at-risk” Afghan nationals and others who are in transit to the United States and other destinations worldwide.

“The decision to host those in need is informed by the Government of Uganda’s consistent policy of receiving refugees and persons in distress as well as playing a responsible role in matters of international concern,” the ministry said in a statement.

Media reports have suggested Uganda had agreed to take about 2,000 refugees but this has not been confirmed.

Uganda hosts one of the largest refugee populations in the world — nearly 1.5 million according to the United Nations, mainly from neighbouring South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The ministry said that arrangements were also being made to bring home a number of Ugandans who were unable to make this first flight “due to the challenges of accessing the airport in Kabul”.

Neighbouring Rwanda said on Tuesday it also plans to take in dozens of schoolgirls and staff from Afghanistan’s only boarding school for girls.

Since the Taliban’s August 15 takeover of Kabul, Afghans have grown increasingly desperate to escape the country, with many terrified of facing life under the hardline Islamist group.

The US embassy in Kampala thanked Uganda for its “generosity and hospitality toward these communities”.

“The Government of Uganda and the Ugandan people have a long tradition of welcoming refugees and other communities in need,” the embassy posted on Twitter.

Most refugees in Uganda live in large refugee settlements in the sparsely populated north of the country but around 81,000 urban refugees live in the capital Kampala.

Aid agencies have repeatedly said that the international response to support refugees in Uganda, a country of about 44 million people, has been underfunded.

-AFP

Uganda Suspends 54 Civil Society Groups

A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni
A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni

 

The Ugandan government said on Friday it had ordered more than 50 non-governmental organisations to suspend operations, a major escalation of its efforts to tighten control over civil society.

The 54 groups affected include the country’s most prominent rights organisation, Chapter Four, as well as charities, religious, environmental and electoral democracy groups.

The shutdown was ordered “with immediate effect”, the National Bureau for NGOs, part of the ministry of internal affairs, said in a statement.

It said the groups had failed to comply with legislation covering their activities, including operating with expired permits, not filing accounts or not registering with the authorities.

READ ALSO: Uganda Offers To Take In Refugees From Afghanistan

Some of the organisations ordered to close had taken part in an election monitoring operation on polling day in January which was raided by security forces and during which several of their leaders were arrested.

The hotly disputed poll saw President Yoweri Museveni returned for a sixth term in office after a violent campaign marked by the harassment and arrest of opposition figures, attacks on the media and the deaths of several dozen people.

Chapter Four executive director Nicholas Opiyo denied any unlawful conduct by his group and said the government action was part of a “wider crackdown” on civil society.

“This is but a continuation of the restricting of civic space in Uganda using legal, administrative and physical restraints on organisations across the country,” he told AFP.

‘Deeply concerned’

Responding to the shutdown, both the European Union Union and the United States issued similar statements underlining the importance of civil society in the country without directly criticising the government’s action.

“We hope any issues with registration of organisations can be resolved promptly so their important work can continue in the spirit of genuine partnership based on mutual accountability,” the US embassy in Uganda said.

The International Commission of Jurists Africa branch said it was “deeply concerned” by the suspension of Chapter Four.

“We encourage the authorities to urgently resolve this situation to enable Chapter Four to commence operations again,” it said on Twitter.

In December 2020 — a month ahead of the election — Ugandan authorities arrested Opiyo for alleged money-laundering.

Opiyo — who has been awarded several prestigious human rights prizes for his activism — spent Christmas in detention at a high security prison before being released on bail a week later.

Despite repeated court appearances since then, the government has not produced any evidence to support its allegations.

A group of 14 major international donors, including the European Union and the United States, had protested at Opiyo’s arrest.

Charity Ahimbisibwe, who leads the Citizens’ Coalition for Electoral Democracy (CCEDU) — another of the shuttered organisations — described the government action as “extremely unfortunate”.

Ahimbisibwe said the move came after the organisation had received repeated summons to government offices since it released a report that had catalogued malpractice during the election.

Ahimbisibwe said the CCEDU’s operating permit had expired but it had asked for an extension because it was not possible to renew it during the long coronavirus lockdown and apparent stalling by local government officials.

“As a law-abiding body we will not continue to operate without the permit,” Ahimbisibwe said.

On Saturday, Museveni had publicly scolded Uganda’s security forces for using excessive violence, as the opposition alleges hundreds of their supporters disappeared or died following the violent election crackdown.

The veteran president, who was re-elected despite widespread reports of irregularities, blamed “indiscipline” and “laziness” among state forces for incidents that resulted in the death of Ugandans.

At least 54 people were shot dead in November while demonstrating over the arrest of Museveni’s main political opponent, the rapper-turned-MP Bobi Wine.

 

AFP

Uganda Offers To Take In Refugees From Afghanistan

A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni
A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni.

 

Uganda said on Tuesday it was considering a US request to take in refugees from Afghanistan, where tens of thousands of people are trying to flee after the Taliban seized power.

President Yoweri Museveni has “expressed Uganda’s readiness to provide assistance including temporary hosting of some of the affected persons in the current crisis,” the foreign ministry said in a statement.

“Discussions on this issue are still ongoing.”

Media reports had suggested that Uganda — already home to the biggest refugee population in Africa — had agreed to take about 2,000 refugees but this was not confirmed in the ministry statement.

READ ALSO: Taliban Announce ‘General Amnesty’ For Government Officials

“Following the events of last weekend in Afghanistan the government of the United States of America reached out to several of its international partners including Uganda to assist in the likely event of the need to temporarily host some of the Afghans and international citizens that may be evacuated,” the statement said.

An official from the UN refugee agency told AFP it had not been involved in the discussions between the United States and Uganda but that it stood “ready to support” any refugees who arrive in the East African country.

Uganda hosts one of the largest refugee populations in the world — nearly 1.5 million according to the United Nations, mainly from neighbouring South Sudan and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

Most live in large refugee settlements in the sparsely populated north of the country but around 81,000 urban refugees live in the capital Kampala.

Aid agencies have repeatedly said that the international response to support refugees in Uganda, a country of about 44 million people, has been underfunded.

 

AFP

UPDATED: Ugandan Weightlifter To Face Fraud Charge Over Olympics Disappearance

 

A young Ugandan weightlifter who disappeared in Japan after failing to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics was charged Wednesday with conspiracy to defraud, his lawyer said.

A young Ugandan weightlifter who disappeared in Japan after failing to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics was charged Wednesday with conspiracy to defraud, his lawyer said.

Julius Ssekitoleko vanished from an Olympic training camp after learning he did not meet standards to compete in the Games, making headlines around the world as Japanese officials scrambled to locate him.

The 20-year-old was found several days later and flown home to Uganda where government officials said he would undergo counselling.

But he was swiftly taken into police custody, and on Wednesday he was charged with “conspiracy to defraud” before being released on a police bond, his lawyer Anthony Wameli told AFP.

“He is happy that he has been freed after spending five days in detention which is an infringement on his rights,” he added.

A spokesman for Uganda’s criminal investigations department said Ssekitoleko may have conspired with a government official to be included on the team for Japan “well aware that he did not meet the qualifications”.

“Investigations will confirm the depth of the conspiracy to defraud the government as he had been paid allowances at the time of his disappearance,” the spokesman, Charles Twine, told AFP.

‘Sympathy not harsh treatment’

Ssekitoleko’s family had issued appeals for his release, saying his rights were being violated.

“This is an innocent young man. He didn’t want to hurt anyone. Why is he being treated like a criminal?” asked his mother Juliet Nalwadda, speaking to AFP earlier Wednesday.

Uganda’s weightlifting federation said Ssekitoleko came from a poor family and had been training hard for his first Olympics.

After he went missing, a note was found in Ssekitoleko’s hotel room in which he said he wanted to work in Japan and asked that his belongings be sent to his family in Uganda.

The Union of Uganda Sports Federations and Associations had also condemned Ssekitoleko’s detention.

“He deserves sympathy, not harsh treatment” the head of the union, Moses Muhangi, told AFP.

Ssekitoleko’s plight has stirred mixed reactions in Uganda. The government was forced to apologise to Japan over the incident that Uganda’s state minister for foreign affairs labelled “unacceptable conduct and treachery”.

But others have been more sympathetic toward the young athlete whose dreams were dashed.

“Ssekitoleko is not a criminal, he is a victim of an economy that works for the few (in the) privileged class,” Ugandan legislator Betty Nambooze said Wednesday.

vanished from an Olympic training camp after learning he did not meet standards to compete in the Games, making headlines around the world as Japanese officials scrambled to locate him.

The 20-year-old was found several days later and flown home to Uganda where government officials said he would undergo counselling.

But he was swiftly taken into police custody, and on Wednesday he was charged with “conspiracy to defraud” before being released on a police bond, his lawyer Anthony Wameli told AFP.

“He is happy that he has been freed after spending five days in detention which is an infringement on his rights,” he added.

A spokesman for Uganda’s criminal investigations department, said Ssekitoleko may have conspired with a government official to be included on the team for Japan “well aware that he did not meet the qualifications”.

“Investigations will confirm the depth of the conspiracy to defraud the government as he had been paid allowances at the time of his disappearance,” the spokesman, Charles Twine, told AFP.

– ‘Sympathy not harsh treatment’ –

Ssekitoleko’s family had issued appeals for his release, saying his rights were being violated.

“This is an innocent young man. He didn’t want to hurt anyone. Why is he being treated like a criminal?” asked his mother Juliet Nalwadda, speaking to AFP earlier Wednesday.

Uganda’s weightlifting federation said Ssekitoleko came from a poor family and had been training hard for his first Olympics.

After he went missing, a note was found in Ssekitoleko’s hotel room in which he said he wanted to work in Japan and asked that his belongings be sent to his family in Uganda.

The Union of Uganda Sports Federations and Associations had also condemned Ssekitoleko’s detention.

“He deserves sympathy, not harsh treatment” the head of the union, Moses Muhangi, told AFP.

Ssekitoleko’s plight has stirred mixed reactions in Uganda. The government was forced to apologise to Japan over the incident that Uganda’s state minister for foreign affairs labelled “unacceptable conduct and treachery”.

But others have been more sympathetic toward the young athlete whose dreams were dashed.

“Ssekitoleko is not a criminal, he is a victim of an economy that works for the few (in the) privileged class,” Ugandan legislator Betty Nambooze said Wednesday.

Ugandan Weightlifter Detained By Police After Going Missing In Japan

 

Ugandan police said Wednesday they were interrogating a weightlifter who disappeared in Japan after failing to qualify for the Tokyo Olympics, as his family appealed for his release from custody.

Julius Ssekitoleko, 20, vanished from an Olympic training camp after learning he did not meet standards to compete in the Games, making headlines around the world as Japanese officials scrambled to locate him.

He was found and flown home to Uganda where government officials said he would undergo counselling.

But he was taken into police custody, said family members who have petitioned the courts for his release.

“It is heartbreaking to see my son sharing a cell with criminals when he is innocent,” the athlete’s mother, Juliet Nalwadda, told AFP Wednesday.

“His rights are being violated by police detaining him indefinitely. I appeal to the government, and sportsmen and women, to secure his release. This is an innocent young man. He didn’t want to hurt anyone. Why is he being treated like a criminal?”

A spokesman for Uganda’s criminal investigations department said Ssekitoleko was being held for interrogation over suspected “fraud”.

“We have been informed Ssekitoleko in the first place did not qualify to be on the team. So how did he get there, who could have been behind his movement, this is what the police are trying to establish,” the spokesman, Charles Twine, told AFP.

“If there is evidence of fraud or an illegal act, Ssekitoleko will be taken to court and charged in line with the offence committed. If there is no evidence, he will be set free.”

Uganda’s weightlifting federation said Ssekitoleko came from a poor family and had been training very hard for his first Olympics.

After he went missing, a note was found in Ssekitoleko’s hotel room in which he said he wanted to work in Japan and asked that his belongings be sent to his family in Uganda.

The Union of Uganda Sports Federations and Associations condemned Ssekitoleko’s ongoing detention and called for his immediate release so he could be reunited with his family.

“He deserves sympathy, not harsh treatment” the head of the union, Moses Muhangi, told AFP.

Ssekitoleko’s plight has stirred mixed reactions in Uganda. The government was forced to apologise to Japan over the incident that Uganda’s state minister for foreign affairs labelled “unacceptable conduct and treachery”.

But others have been more sympathetic toward the young athlete whose dreams were dashed.

“Ssekitoleko is not a criminal, he is a victim of an economy that works for the few (in the) privileged class,” Ugandan legislator Betty Nambooze said Wednesday.

-AFP

Ugandan Weightlifter Who Went Missing In Japan Deported

Julius Ssekitoleko had said he wanted to stay and work in Japan.

 

Ugandan weightlifter Julius Ssekitoleko has returned home on Friday, days after he went missing from a pre-Olympics camp in western Japan. 

Local media reports that Ssekitoleko is being held at the Ugandan police headquarters to determine if he committed an offence or not.

His pregnant wife, mother and government officials who had travelled to the Entebbe airport could not greet him upon arrival.

Uganda’s ministry of foreign affairs in a statement noted that the athlete was being  “rehabilitated,” assuring that the government would help him understand how such acts of misconduct cannot only affect him as an athlete but also other athletes in the sports sector and the nation at large.”

READ ALSO: Fans Urged To Stay Away From Olympic Marathon Over COVID-19 Fears

Julius Ssekitoleko. AFP

 

The 20-year-old went missing from the camp a week ago but was later tracked down in Mie Prefecture on Tuesday in a joint operation between Japanese authorities and the Ugandan Embassy in Japan.

He did not meet the Olympic standards in the latest International rankings and thus fled the Team Uganda camp during pre-Olympics training.

Ssekitoleko had left a note in which he said he wanted to stay and work in the Asian nation.

 

Hundreds Of Ugandans Given Fake COVID-19 Jabs – Health Officials

Uganda map

 

At least 800 people in Uganda were given fake coronavirus vaccines — some injected with water — in a scam that involved “unscrupulous” doctors and health workers, government officials said Wednesday.

The counterfeit jabs were administered over May and June during a deadly surge of the coronavirus in the East African nation, when new infections soared to record highs of about 1,700 cases per day.

The fraudsters targeted people looking to pay for immunisation, including corporate employees, at a time when vaccines were in short supply, said Dr Warren Naamara, the director of a health services monitoring unit under the presidency.

“Some unscrupulous individuals with intentions of making money, duped members of the public into a fake Covid-19 vaccine exercise,” Dr Naamara told AFP.

“We have arrested two medical workers in the scam, and one medical doctor is on the run.”

He said those conned into getting a fake vaccine — around 800 people — should not be alarmed as tests indicated the vials contained nothing dangerous.

“Some had water in them,” he added.

The scammers charged recipients between 80,000 and 500,000 Ugandan shillings (around $25-$120 / 20-100 euros) for a fake shot, officials said.

The health ministry said Wednesday that the government was providing free and approved Covid-19 jabs at designated vaccination sites.

On June 18, as coronavirus cases and deaths in Uganda surged to record highs, President Yoweri Museveni announced a freeze on all public and private transport for 42 days, and imposed a strict dusk-to-dawn curfew to try and drive numbers down.

The veteran president warned that hospitals were full and not coping with the outbreak.

Since then, infection numbers have dipped, with 252 cases reported on Wednesday.

Uganda has overall recorded 91,162 infections, of which 2,425 have been fatal, since the pandemic began, according to the health ministry’s latest tally Wednesday.

AFP

Outcry As Ugandan Govt Introduces New Internet Tax

AFP

 

Ugandan internet users have been hit by a new tax on mobile data in a move the country’s opposition leader branded a new assault on freedom of speech.

The levy came into effect on Thursday and imposes a 12 percent excise duty on mobile data, pushing up costs in a nation already bogged down by sky-high data fees.

The new tax is part of a government initiative to raise revenue for public services and will replace a fiercely-contested social media tax imposed in 2018, the minister of state for finance and planning, Amos Lugoloobi, told AFP on Friday.

“The new mechanism is to help (the) government achieve its main objective of industrialisation for inclusive growth, employment and wealth creation,” he said.

Opposition leader Bobi Wine, who led 2018 protests against the previous social media tax, said on Twitter that freedom of speech was under attack in a new form.

“We must never stop protesting against these schemes by a paranoid, greedy regime,” said the firebrand singer-turned-lawmaker — who lost to President Yoweri Museveni in a January election.

The new tax will not be imposed on mobile data purchased for research, medical or educational purposes, but it remains unclear how that will be implemented.

READ ALSO: 64 Dead In Ethiopian Air Strike As Army Denies Targeting Civilians

Adding to lockdown woes 

A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni
A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni

 

Moses Serwanga, a communications consultant who doubles as a human rights lawyer, also criticised the tax.

“With the current national (coronavirus) lockdown, many students have been getting educational materials, lectures through the internet. Now it is very expensive for them because of the 12 percent tax,” said Serwanga, voicing hope that the tax could be challenged in court.

“The new tax will impact on businesses, freedom to access information which is a constitutional right, access to education, again a constitutional right,” he added.

Internet user Mary Ruth Akol told AFP she was forced offline as she could not afford data with the new fees.

“The new tax will worsen our situation during this Covid-19 lockdown. We are encouraged to stay home but without internet, it is a bad situation,” she said.

As coronavirus cases and deaths surged to record highs, Museveni last month froze all public and private transport, and imposed a strict dusk-to-dawn curfew across the country of 45 million people.

Under the old arrangement, users of WhatsApp, Facebook, Skype and other social media or so-called “over the top” services which publish content bypassing traditional distributors, were required to pay a compulsory daily fee of 200 shillings ($0.06,0.05 euros) before they could access the sites.

That tax triggered an immediate outcry with thousands of demonstrators facing off against anti-riot police to demand its abolition, fearing it could be used to curb free speech.

Uganda map

 

Most users turned to virtual private networks (VPNs) to disguise their location and skirt the tax, a trick learned during past elections when the government tried to shut down social media and clipped the projected revenues from the levy.

Museveni — himself an avid Twitter user with 2.2 million followers — at the time defended the tax, saying it will put an end to “gossip”.

VPNs will not be of help this time round as the fees will be embedded in the cost of the data, Serwanga warned.

The East African country has some 18.8 million internet users, according to December 2020 data from the communications regulator.

AFP

Uganda Tightens Restrictions As COVID-19 Cases Surge

 

A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni
A file photo of Ugandan president, Yoweri Museveni

 

Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni further toughened virus curbs on Sunday night, including ordering the closure of schools, to stem a worrying rise in local transmissions.

Schools will be closed from Monday for six weeks and most gatherings, save for weddings and funerals in small groups, were banned.

Non-essential travel between districts was suspended and a 9:00 pm to 4:00 am curfew will remain in force until mid-July.

Most shops and markets remain open, provided they comply with government health regulations, but bars remain closed.

Uganda had kept its Covid-19 cases relatively low and was spared the worst of the pandemic after adopting one of Africa’s tightest lockdowns, but it eased the measures as cases dropped.

However, infections have soared in recent weeks with a sharp increase in severe cases.

Hospitals have been overwhelmed as all intensive care and high dependency beds are occupied, threatening to collapse the fragile healthcare system.

“In this wave, the intensity of severe and critically ill Covid-19 patients, and deaths is higher than what we experienced in the first wave of the pandemic,” Museveni said in a televised address.

Museveni explained that the East African country had recorded as many severe and critical cases of Covid-19 in a fortnight as it did in a three to four month period during the first wave.

“We are concerned that this will exhaust available bed space and oxygen supply in hospitals, unless we constitute urgent public health measures,” said Museveni.

The country has counted 52,935 cases of coronavirus, of which 383 have been fatal, figures believed to be undercounted as a result of low testing.

As in many African nations, innoculation has been slow in part due to vaccine apathy and limited supplies.

Ugandan Opposition Leader Bobi Wine Arrested For Leading Protest

 

 

Photo Credit: Daily Monitor

 

Ugandan opposition leader Bobi Wine was arrested on Monday as he took part in a protest in the capital, according to a post on his Twitter page.

The 39-year-old popstar-turned-presidential contender last week had called on Ugandans to “rise up peacefully and unarmed” against President Yoweri Museveni who won a sixth term in office following disputed elections in January.

“Bobi Wine arrested as he led MPs and other leaders in a peaceful protest against the abduction, torture and murder of his supporters,” said the post, written by an account administrator.

Around 15 MPs and activists from Wine’s National Unity Platform (NUP) political party, wearing business suits and red ties, took part in the brief protest which was quickly halted by police officers and soldiers.

Bystanders cheered their support for the small group of protesters but did not join the demonstration itself.

Wine, whose real name is Robert Kyagulanyi, was first taken to a police station before being driven in a police vehicle to his home outside Kampala which is “now surrounded by police and the military,” his Twitter account said.

Following the January 14 election, Wine was held under effective house arrest for 11 days until a court ordered his release.

Demonstrations against Wine’s arrest in November during the campaign for the poll were brutally dispersed and at least 54 people died.

The police pre-emptively declared Wine’s latest call for protests illegal and warned: “organisers… to desist from participating in any unlawful activities”.

Wine was demanding the release of hundreds of his supporters he alleges have been abducted by security forces since the start of the presidential election campaign late last year.

On Thursday Human Rights Watch (HRW) called for an end to what it called “ongoing abductions by suspected state agents and cease the unlawful detention without trial of opposition supporters”.

Museveni and his ministers have admitted that hundreds of Ugandans are in military detention but say they will either face a military tribunal or be released.

In a television address on Sunday night Museveni referred to people who had been abducted as “children”, described their actions as criminal and accused them of attacking government supporters.

“The children who were arrested by the security forces, many of them have been talked to and they have given us a lot of information and we have helped them to go back to their families,” he said.

-AFP

32 Killed In Uganda Road Accident

The Ugandan Flag

 

Thirty-two people died and five were injured on Tuesday when a truck carrying mourners collided with a car and three other vehicles in Uganda, the Ugandan Red Cross said.

The overloaded truck, carrying mourners and a coffin, collided with a car near Kasese in western Uganda shortly before midnight, according to Red Cross spokeswoman Irene Nakasiita.

“The road is small, it’s under construction and it was dark,” said Nakasiita.

Shortly afterwards, two trucks coming from Kasese ploughed into the crash site and a third coming in the opposite direction, from Bundibugyo, also struck the vehicles and overturned.

“So it made up five cars all involved at the same scene,” said Nakasiita.

Red Cross staff and volunteers worked with Ugandan soldiers to transport the dead and evacuated the five survivors.

Poorly maintained vehicles and unsafe highways are common in Uganda which has one of the world’s highest rates of road traffic accidents.

Fatal collisions are becoming increasingly common and cost the East African nation five per cent of its gross domestic product each year, according to a UN report in 2018.