DR Congo Records New Ebola Case Five Months After Last Outbreak

In this file photo taken on June 13, 2017, a health worker walks at an Ebola quarantine unit in Muma, after a case of Ebola was confirmed in the village in the Democratic Republic of Congo. JOHN WESSELS / AFP

 

One Ebola case has been recorded in the Democratic Republic of Congo, five months after the latest epidemic of the disease in the country was declared over, the government said on Friday.

“The case concerns a three-year-old boy who was hospitalised and died on October 6,” the health ministry said in a statement, adding that the case was in Beni, in North Kivu province.

A sample taken from the child was sent to Goma, the provincial capital, and was found to be positive.

Teams on the ground are working to trace and monitor around 100 contacts, as well as decontaminate health facilities, the ministry said.

READ ALSO: 51 Dead, Scores Missing As Makeshift Vessel Sinks In DR Congo

“Thanks to the experience gained in the management of the Ebola virus disease during previous epidemics, we are confident that the response teams… will manage to control this epidemic as soon as possible,” the statement said.

In early May, the DRC declared the end of its 12th Ebola outbreak, during which 12 cases were reported, with six deaths and hundreds of people vaccinated.

The disease had reappeared in February in an area of North Kivu that between August 2018 and June 2020 experienced the largest outbreak of Ebola in the history of the DRC — with 3,470 infections and 2,287 deaths.

Ebola is a viral haemorrhagic fever that was first identified in central Africa in 1976. The disease was named after a river in the Democratic Republic of Congo, then known as Zaire.

Human transmission is through body fluids, with the main symptoms being fever, vomiting, bleeding, and diarrhoea.

Guinea Declares End Of Marburg Virus Outbreak, Says WHO

A picture of the billboard of the World Health Organization (WHO)

 

Guinea has declared the end of an outbreak of the Marburg virus, which belongs to the same family as Ebola, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

Health authorities in the country confirmed West Africa’s first recorded case of Marburg on August 9, in a man whose infection was detected after he had died a week earlier.

No treatment or vaccine exists for Marburg, which belongs to the same filovirus family as Ebola and is somewhat less deadly.

Its symptoms include high fever and internal and external bleeding.

To prevent the spread of the virus, Guinean health authorities began monitoring the Marburg victim’s contact cases.

The WHO said in a statement that no other cases had been detected since, and the outbreak is over.

“Without immediate and decisive action, highly infectious diseases like Marburg can easily get out of hand,” the statement quoted WHO Africa director Matshidiso Moeti as saying.

She added that Guinea’s growing expertise in responding to viral outbreaks had prevented a “spillover” and saved lives.

A poor nation of 13 million people, Guinea was hit hard by the 2013-16 West African Ebola outbreak, which killed about 2,300 people in the country.

Ebola resurfaced in northeastern Guinea in February, killing 12 people, before that outbreak was declared over in June.

AFP

‘No Evidence’ Woman In Cote d’ Ivoire Had Ebola – WHO

This file photo taken on June 28, 2014 shows a member of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) putting on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry, where people infected with the Ebola virus are being treated.  CELLOU BINANI / AFP

 

There is “no evidence” that a Guinean woman who tested positive for Ebola after arriving in neighbouring Ivory Coast had the disease, the WHO said on Tuesday citing a new analysis from a lab in France.

Her diagnosis in mid-August was thought to be the first confirmed case of Ebola in the west African country since 1994.

The diagnoses sparked a huge contact-tracing operation by the World Health Organization and Ivorian medics started a vaccination campaign targeting those who were in immediate contact with the woman.

The 18-year-old had travelled to Abidjan by bus from Labe in northern Guinea, a journey of about 1,500 kilometres (950 miles) that passes through a densely forested region where Ebola epidemics broke out earlier this year and in 2013-16.

“With the new results from the laboratory in Lyon WHO considers that the patient did not have Ebola virus disease and further analysis on the cause of her illness is ongoing,” the UN’s health agency said in a statement on Tuesday.

READ ALSO: [COVID-19] FG Considers Action Against People Who Refuse Vaccines Nigeria Confirms 626 COVID-19 Cases As FG Warns Vaccine Skeptics
South Africa Scientists Monitoring New COVID-19 Variant

Cote d’Ivoire Records First Case Of Ebola

This file photo taken on August 15, 2014 shows an MSF medical workers checking their protective clothing in a mirror at an MSF facility in Kailahun, epicentre of the world’s worst Ebola outbreak.
CARL DE SOUZA / AFP

 

The WHO said it had been informed of the new results by the Ivorian government.

It added that after more than 140 contacts of the woman had been traced, nobody else had shown symptoms of the disease or tested positive.

The case sparked a row between the two countries after Guinea requested reconfirmation of her positive test, pushing Ivorian officials to defend the diagnosis.

Ebola, which is transmitted through close contact with bodily fluids, is a fatal viral disease that causes severe fever and, in the worst cases, unstoppable bleeding.

AFP

Cote d’Ivoire Records First Case Of Ebola

This file photo taken on August 15, 2014 shows an MSF medical worker checking their protective clothing in a mirror at an MSF facility in Kailahun, epicentre of the world’s worst Ebola outbreak.  CARL DE SOUZA / AFP

 

Cote d’Ivoire has recorded a first case of Ebola, the health minister announced late Saturday, the first occurrence of the deadly disease in nearly three decades.

Officials at the Institut Pasteur had confirmed the case after testing samples taken from an 18-year-old Guinean woman, Health Minister Pierre N’Gou Demba said on RTI state television.

She had left the city of Labe in Guinea by road, arriving in Ivory Coast on Wednesday, he added.

“This is an isolated and imported case,” he said, adding that the patient was currently being treated in intensive care in Abidjan.

Ivory Coast already had doses of the vaccine against Ebola, which go to anyone who had been in contact with her, such as the medical staff treating her.

Prime Minister Patrick Achi had chaired an emergency inter-ministerial meeting earlier Saturday, the minister added.

Appealing for calm, he said the authorities had already activated an emergency plan which included the identification and surveillance of anyone who had come into contact with the patient.

According to the World Health Organisation, this is the first case of Ebola in Ivory Coast since 1994.


READ ALSO: [Factfile] The Marburg Virus, Ebola’s Deadly Cousin

READ ALSO: First West African Case Of Deadly Marburg Virus Detected


 

 ‘Immense concern’ 

In this file photo taken on March 09, 2019 Health workers are seen inside the ‘red zone’ of an Ebola treatment centre, which was attacked in the early hours of the morning in Butembo.(Photo by JOHN WESSELS / AFP)

 

On June 19, the World Health Organization declared an end to a four-month outbreak of Ebola in Guinea that claimed the lives of 12 people there.

But a statement from WHO Africa on Saturday said: “There is no indication that the current case in Cote d’Ivoire (Ivory Coast) is linked to the earlier outbreak in Guinea.

“Further investigation and genomic sequencing will identify the strain and determine if there is a connection between the two outbreaks,” the statement added.

“It is of immense concern that this outbreak has been declared in Abidjan, a metropolis of more than four million people,” Matshidiso Moeti, the WHO’s Africa regional director, said in the statement.

“However, much of the world’s expertise in tackling Ebola is here on the continent and Cote d’Ivoire can tap into this experience and bring the response to full speed.”

The WHO said it was helping to coordinate a cross-border response, which included transferring 5,000 doses of Ebola vaccine from Guinea to Ivory Coast.

Ebola causes severe fever and, in the worst cases, unstoppable bleeding.

It is transmitted through close contact with bodily fluids, and people who live with or care for patients are most at risk.

In four decades, periodic Ebola outbreaks have killed around 15,000 people, all in Africa.

Its fatality rate in past outbreaks has varied between 25 and 90 percent.

But as the WHO pointed out: “There is now effective treatment available and if patients receive treatment early, as well as supportive care, their chances of survival improve significantly.”

AFP

Factfile: The Marburg Virus, Ebola’s Deadly Cousin

 

 

Guinea has recorded the first known case of the Marburg virus, a lethal cousin to Ebola, the UN’s World Health Organization (WHO) says.

Here is a factfile on the disease (source: WHO, US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention).

What is Marburg?

Marburg virus is a highly dangerous pathogen that causes haemorrhagic fever.

According to past outbreaks, the average fatality rate is 50 percent, in a range of 24-88 percent.

The virus is part of the so-called filovirus family to which the Ebola virus also belongs.

It takes its name from the German city of Marburg, where it was first identified in 1967, in a lab where workers had been in contact with infected green monkeys that had been imported from Uganda.

Two other outbreaks occurred at the same time in Frankfurt, also in Germany, and in Belgrade, then the capital of Yugoslavia, now Serbia. Seven people died.

How is it transmitted?

The natural “reservoir,” or host, of the Marburg virus is the African fruit bat.

The cave-dwelling mammals carry the virus but do not fall sick from it, and can hand the virus to primates in close proximity, including humans — one suspected pathway is the killing or butchering of infected bats for food.

Human-to-human transmission then occurs through contact with blood or other bodily fluids, or contact with surfaces such as bedding or clothing that are contaminated with these fluids. Some infections have happened accidentally in the lab, through needle wounds.

What are the symptoms?

The virus takes between two and 21 days to incubate, leading to abrupt symptoms of high fever, severe headaches, muscular pain, vomiting and diarrhoea — symptoms that can make Marburg difficult to diagnose initially, as they are similar to diseases such as typhoid and malaria.

Haemorrhagic episodes typically follow between five and seven days later, with blood in the vomit and faeces and bleeding from the nose, gums and vagina. In fatal cases, death occurs most often between eight and nine days.

What treatments are available?

There are no vaccines or antiviral treatments for Marburg disease. However, rehydration with oral or intravenous techniques improves survival and experimental use of monoclonal antibody drugs has been promising.

This is why it is crucial to stamp out the disease from the outset, say experts.

“You have to step up surveillance, identify all contact cases in order to isolate them if they start developing the disease, to prevent any transmission,” said Ousmane Faye, a virologist at the Pasteur Institute in Dakar, the capital of Senegal.

Other outbreaks

The single case that has so far been detected in Guinea occurred in a village in the district of Gueckedou, in a forested region in the south of the country close to the borders with Sierra Leone and Liberia.

The patient is a man who died on August 2 after developing symptoms on July 25.

Three of his relatives and a health workers have been identified as being at high risk and are under close surveillance. Around 150 others, considered contact cases, are also being monitored daily. The country has also stepped up cross-border vigilance.

Previous outbreaks and sporadic cases have been recorded in South Africa, Angola, Kenya, Uganda and the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The deadliest epidemic so far occurred in northern Angola in 2005, in which 329 patients out of 374 died.

Guinea is one of the poorest countries in the world.

It was one of three countries, along with Liberia and Sierra Leone, which was hit by the biggest-ever epidemic of Ebola, an episode that ran from 2013-16 and claimed more than 11,300 lives.

A second outbreak in Guinea began in February this year, killing 12 people before being declared over on June 19.

First West African Case Of Deadly Marburg Virus Detected

Margus outbreaks are often associated with exposure to colonies of Rousettus bats (Photo: YASSER AL-ZAYYAT AFP)

 

 

Guinea confirmed a case of Marburg disease, the World Health Organization said on Monday, the first recorded in West Africa of the lethal virus that’s related to Ebola and, like COVID-19, passed from animal hosts to humans.

The virus, which is carried by bats and has a fatality rate of up to 88 percent, was found in samples taken from a patient who died on August 2 in southern Gueckedou prefecture, the WHO said.

“The potential for the Marburg virus to spread far and wide means we need to stop it in its tracks,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.

The discovery comes just two months after the WHO declared an end to Guinea’s second outbreak of Ebola, which started last year and claimed 12 lives.

In Geneva, the WHO said it considered the threat “high” at the national and regional level, but “low” globally.

“We are working with the health authorities to implement a swift response that builds on Guinea’s past experience and expertise in managing Ebola, which is transmitted in a similar way,” Moeti said.

The Guinean government confirmed the Marburg case in a statement.

Marburg virus is usually associated with exposure to caves or mines housing colonies of Rousettus bats. Once caught by a human, it is spread through contact with bodily fluids of infected people, or with contaminated surfaces and materials, according to the WHO.

– Rapid response –
“We applaud the alertness and the quick investigative action by Guinea’s health workers,” Moeti said.

The case was detected in a village in a forested region close to the borders of Sierra Leone and Liberia.

The man’s symptoms date back to July 25, the WHO said.

After being initially treated at a local clinic and tested for malaria, the patient died “in the community”, the WHO said.

Post-mortem samples then tested negative for Ebola, but positive for Marburg.

Ten WHO experts, including epidemiologists and socio-anthropologists, are already in the field to support national health authorities.

The emergency response includes risk assessment, disease surveillance, community mobilisation and screening, clinical care, infection control and logistical support, WHO said.

Cross-border surveillance has also been stepped up so that possible cases can be quickly detected, it said.

Three family members of the deceased and a healthcare worker have been identified as high-risk close contacts and are being monitored, while investigations are under way to identify the source of the infection and any other possible contacts, the WHO said.

Previous outbreaks and sporadic cases have been reported in South Africa, Angola, Kenya, Uganda, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

But this is the first time the virus has been detected in West Africa.

The disease begins suddenly, with a high fever, severe headache and discomfort.

Fatality rates have ranged from 24 percent to 88 percent in previous outbreaks, depending on the virus strain and case management, the WHO says.

Although there are no approved vaccines or antiviral treatments, oral or intravenous rehydration and treatment of specific symptoms improve survival rates, it says.

Sierra Leone To Vaccinate Health Workers Against Ebola

A young man receives a vaccine against Ebola from a nurse in Goma on August 7, 2019. Three cases of the deadly virus was detected in the border city of Goma, the Congolese presidency said on August 1, 2019. Augustin WAMENYA / AFP

 

Sierra Leone announced Saturday it will vaccinate health workers against Ebola in areas near its border with Guinea, where the disease re-emerged in January.

Health Minister Austin Demby said in a statement that US drugs firm Johnson & Johnson was to supply 640 doses of its Ebola vaccine on Saturday and 3,840 doses on Sunday as donations.

“In view of the ongoing outbreak of Ebola in neighbouring Guinea, frontline healthcare workers in border districts are at risk of infection should the virus spill over to Sierra Leone,” the statement said.

READ ALSO: DR Congo Starts Countdown To End Of Ebola Outbreak

The deadly virus reappeared in Guinea in January, evoking the spectres of the devastating 2013-2016 Ebola epidemic in West Africa, which left 11,300 dead in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The official death toll in Sierra Leone was some 4,000 people.

A total of 23 cases have been reported since January in Guinea, mainly in the Nzerekore region, near Liberia, Sierra Leone and Ivory Coast.

Sixteen cases have been confirmed, including five deaths, according to the World Health Organization.

In February, Guinea received more than 11,000 doses of Merck’s vaccine provided by the WHO, but measures taken to stop infections, isolate and treat patients and carry out vaccinations sometimes meet resistance from residents.

Ebola, which is transmitted through close contact with bodily fluids, causes severe fever and, in the worst cases, unstoppable bleeding.

Death rates are high, at around 50 percent on average of those infected, and up to 90 percent for some epidemics, WHO data shows.

AFP

DR Congo Starts Countdown To End Of Ebola Outbreak

A DR Congo flag.

 

 

The Democratic Republic of Congo, where the deadly Ebola virus first emerged in 1976, has begun a countdown to the official end of its latest outbreak, this time in the east of the country, health authorities said Tuesday.

The last patient to be treated for Ebola tested negative for a second time on Sunday, triggering the 42-day countdown from Monday, the World Health Organization’s DR Congo office said.

The period represents twice the average maximum duration of Ebola’s incubation.

Since the virus re-emerged on February 7 in the DRC’s North Kivu province, 12 cases have been recorded, half of them fatal.

The virus, which jumps to humans from infected animals, is transmitted between people through bodily fluids. The main symptoms are fevers, vomiting, bleeding and diarrhoea.

{READ ALSO} COVID-19: First Vaccines Arrive In Papua New Guinea

According to the WHO’s last status report last Thursday, 1,606 people had been vaccinated against Ebola in the DRC, a vast former Belgian colony in central Africa, today one of the world’s poorest countries.

The vaccine, developed by the US lab Merck Sharpe and Dohme, was first used during the 10th Ebola outbreak, which lasted from August 2018 to June 2020 in North and South Kivu and neighbouring Ituri province, as well as during the 11th outbreak, in the western province of Equateur between July and November 2020.

With more than 2,200 recorded deaths, the 10th epidemic is considered the worst to hit the DR Congo since 1976, lasting from August 2018 to June 2020.

The virus also struck Guinea, in West Africa, in mid-February, with 18 cases and nine deaths, according to the WHO.

Nearly 4,000 people have been vaccinated there.

The worst-ever Ebola outbreak began in December 2013 in southern Guinea before spreading to two neighbouring west African countries, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The epidemic killed more than 11,300 people out of nearly 29,000 registered cases, according to WHO estimates.

DR Congo Sentences 16 To Death For 2019 Killing Of Ebola Medic

Man Bags 15 Years In Prison For N5.2m Fraud
A file photo of a court gavel.

 

Sixteen people, including a doctor, have been sentenced to death in absentia for the murder of a Cameroonian Ebola expert, lawyers said on Tuesday.

Richard Valery Mouzoko Kiboung, an epidemiologist employed by the UN’s World Health Organization (WHO), was gunned down in April 2019 at a work meeting at a hospital in Butembo, in North Kivu province.

He was one of many foreign medical workers who had been brought in to help fight an epidemic of Ebola in eastern DR Congo that claimed more than 2,200 lives before it ended in June 2020 after 22 months.

A military court in North Kivu on Monday handed down the death sentence to 16 fugitives, including Dr Jean-Paul Mundama, who were charged with terrorism and criminal association, attorneys familiar with the case said.

The Democratic Republic of Congo has not carried out executions since a moratorium was declared in 2003.

Lawyer Jean-Marie Vianney Muhindo Kanzira told AFP that Mouzoko was allegedly the victim of jealousy by local doctors.

Local doctors earned an Ebola bonus of $20 per day, whereas foreign doctors in senior positions could pick up more than $20,000 per month, according to an investigation last December by a news website, Les Jours.

After meeting with four other local doctors who were angry about the different status, Mundama allegedly gave $700 to a former militiaman, with the promise of $20,000 more, if he and others “got the foreigners to flee,” Les Jours said.

Eight other defendants were present at the weeklong trial.

Of these, two militiamen were jailed for five years, and a second doctor, Gilbert Kasereka Kasisivahwa, was handed three years for criminal association.

The international response to the 2018-20 Ebola epidemic, the 10th in DRC’s history, has been subject to much scrutiny.

Tens of millions of dollars poured into a remote region in a poor country, creating work opportunities for many, such as in logistics and tracing.

But it also stoked rivalries and jealousies between staff from the region and those from the DRC capital Kinshasa, and also between DRC hires and foreign hires.

-AFP

Guinea Launches Ebola Vaccination Campaign

(FILES) This file photo taken on June 28, 2014 shows a member of Doctors Without Borders (MSF) putting on protective gear at the isolation ward of the Donka Hospital in Conakry, where people infected with the Ebola virus are being treated. (Photo by CELLOU BINANI / AFP)

 

Guinea launched an Ebola vaccination campaign on Tuesday after a fresh outbreak of the deadly disease struck the country this month, with officials hoping to eradicate the virus in six weeks.

The country reported new Ebola cases on February 13 — the first in West Africa since a 2013-2016 epidemic that left more than 11,300 dead in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The latest outbreak emerged near the town of Gouecke, in the forested Nzerekore region in Guinea’s southeast, and has already killed five people.

No new cases have however been confirmed for a week.

Ebola causes severe fever and, in the worst cases, unstoppable bleeding.

It is transmitted through close contact with bodily fluids, and people who live with or care for patients are most at risk.

Health workers began to administer Ebola vaccines in Gouecke on Tuesday, after over 11,000 doses arrived in Guinea the previous day.

Guinea’s Health Minister Remy Lamah, as well as Georges Ki-Zerbo, the World Health Organization representative in the country, travelled to the town for the start of the rollout.

The WHO plans to send about another 8,000 doses to Guinea, the UN health agency said in a statement on Tuesday.

Health Minister Lamah told AFP: “I think that in six weeks, we can be done with this disease.”

During a ceremony outside a health centre in Gouecke, local government officials received jabs before a crowd of several dozen people. An imam and preacher also encouraged people to get immunised.

Lamah, who hails from the region, said he had spent the day trying to persuade local leaders to overcome their resistance to the vaccine.

– Contact tracing –
Ki-Zerbo said the jabs would be administered mainly to those who had been in contact with people known to be infected, followed potentially by a second circle of people to break the chain of transmission.

The vaccination campaign also began in Dubreka on the outskirts of the capital Conakry, said Dr Halimatou Keita, who works in a hospital there.

On Wednesday, the rollout will continue in Nzerekore, located around 40 kilometres from Gouecke.

A total of 385 people have been identified as contacts linked to the initial case and that person’s relatives, said Bouna Yattassaye, deputy director of the National Agency for Health Security.

The vast majority of them are being monitored and will be among the first to be vaccinated.

Meanwhile in central Africa, the Democratic Republic of Congo has also seen a new Ebola outbreak.

Officials said Sunday that four people had died while warning that people were resisting measures to contain the highly contagious disease.

 

Ebola Death Toll Rises To Four In DR Congo

This file photo taken on August 15, 2014 shows an MSF medical workers checking their protective clothing in a mirror at an MSF facility in Kailahun, epicentre of the world’s worst Ebola outbreak.
CARL DE SOUZA / AFP

 

Four people have died from the hemorrhagic Ebola virus during a new outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, officials said Sunday, warning that people are resisting measures to contain the highly contagious disease.

Since the epidemic’s resurgence this month, “we have already registered six Ebola cases. We have lost four infected people,” Eugene Syalita, the provincial health minister in North Kivu province in the DRC’s east, told AFP.

Syalita said one person died Friday and another on Saturday, while the two others died in early February.

Two patients are receiving care at an Ebola treatment centre in Katwa near the major city of Butembo, he added.

Syalita complained that the region’s residents were not taking the new outbreak seriously enough.

READ ALSO: 31 Dead In DR Congo Plague Outbreak

“Some families categorically refuse to have their homes disinfected or to hold dignified and safe funerals,” the doctor said.

“People have not yet understood that Ebola has reappeared. Everything is not yet clear for them.”

A vaccination drive was launched last Monday, but as with past outbreaks, people in the region doubt the existence of Ebola and reject measures aimed at checking its spread, including not to touch sick people and not to wash the dead.

The 10th epidemic, which was declared on August 1, 2018, was finally eradicated on June 25 last year after being exacerbated by ongoing armed conflicts and resistance to anti-Ebola measures.

With more than 2,200 deaths recorded, it is considered the most serious in the history of Ebola in the DRC since the scourge fist appeared in 1976, named after a river in the former Belgian colony, which was known as Zaire at the time.

An 11th outbreak of the virus, which is believed to reside in bats, was declared over in November after claiming 55 lives in the northwestern province of Equateur.

– Outbreak in Guinea, too –
Ebola causes severe fever and, in the worst cases, unstoppable bleeding. It is transmitted through close contact with bodily fluids, and people who live with or care for patients are most at risk.

 

In this file photo taken on June 13, 2017 A health worker walks at an Ebola quarantine unit on June 13, 2017 in Muma, after a case of Ebola was confirmed in the village.  JOHN WESSELS / AFP

 

Funeral practices often include washing, touching and kissing bodies that are still capable of transmitting Ebola, and may have particularly high levels of the live virus in excretions.

The virus has also resurfaced in Guinea, where it has already killed five people in the first outbreak in West Africa since a 2013-16 epidemic that left more than 11,300 people dead in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The United States last week said it would work with the affected governments and the World Health Organization over the outbreaks.

“The world cannot afford to turn the other way. We must do everything in our power to respond quickly, effectively,” White House press secretary Jen Psaki said in a statement.

AFP

Ebola Toll Hits Four In DR Congo As People ‘Resist’ Health Measures

FILE: (Photo by JOHN WESSELS / AFP)

 

Four people have died from Ebola during a new outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where people are resisting measures to contain the disease, officials said Sunday.

Since the epidemic’s resurgence this month, “we have already registered six Ebola cases. We have lost four infected people,” Doctor Eugene Syalita, the provincial health minister in North Kivu province in the DRC’s northeast, told AFP.

Syalita said one person died Friday and another on Saturday, while the two others died at the beginning of the month.

Two patients are receiving care at an Ebola treatment centre in Katwa, he added.

Syalita complained that the region’s residents were not taking the new outbreak seriously enough.

“Some families categorically refuse to have their homes disinfected or to hold dignified and safe funerals,” the doctor said.

READ ALSO: Djokovic Beats Medvedev To Win Ninth Australian Open

“People have not yet understood that Ebola has reappeared. Everything is not yet clear for them.”

As in past outbreaks, the population of the region refuses to believe in the existence of the Ebola disease and rejects measures aimed at checking the virus’ spread, such as avoiding touching sick people or not washing the dead who are infected.

The tenth epidemic, which was declared on August 1 2018, was only eradicated on June 25 last year because of unrest caused by armed groups and the population’s resistance to anti-Ebola measures.

With more than 2,200 deaths recorded, it is considered the most serious in the history of Ebola in the DRC since its appearance in 1976.

The Ebola virus is transmitted to people through infected animals. Human transmission is through bodily fluids with the main symptoms being fevers, vomiting, bleeding and diarrhoea.

Ebola has also resurfaced in Guinea, where it has already killed five people.