Vaccine-Preventable Diseases Are Still Available, Says NCDC

NCDC Director General, Dr Ifedayo Adetifa speaks on Channels Television’s Newsnight.

 

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) has said that vaccine-preventable diseases are still available in the country.

NCDC Director General, Dr. Ifedayo Adetifa stated this during an interview on Channels Television’s Newsnight on Sunday, a pre-recorded show which airs every Monday, where he highlighted the agency’s plans in addressing the issue.

According to him, Nigeria is paying the price for the low vaccination rates for a number of vaccine-preventable diseases.

This is because of a number of factors including the reluctance of citizens to make them available, particularly in semi-urban and rural areas.

READ ALSO: NDLEA Arrests Ex-Convict In Lagos Airport, Intercepts 18 Guns

The NCDC boss stated that ailments such as yellow fever, cholera and meningitis continue to take a toll on human health within the country because the momentum for vaccination was also interrupted by the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic and that health agencies are restarting awareness campaigns.

“We have had historical challenges with vaccination coverage just as the country seems to be gaining some momentum with concurrent efforts to strengthen routine immunization and then conduct mass campaigns in response to areas to we know that are under covered,” Adetifa said.

“Of course with COVID, people were afraid of going to the hospital. There were disruptions to immunization – both routine and planned campaigns.

“What now we are seeing is that we are now paying the price for the gaps that occurred then. What we are keeping our eyes on at the NCDC is not what the headlines reflect.”

Speaking on the cholera disease in the country, Adetifa said the agency is “expecting an optic as the rains become established. Ahead of November, we are already preparing for meningitis and the next Lassa Fever again, unfortunately.”

He explained that the NCDC is equally taking measures to contain Omicron and COVID-19 ahead of the yuletide season.

Watch the full interview of Newsnight on Monday, September 19 at 9 pm.

Monkeypox Cases Rise To 157 In Nigeria

This handout picture depicts the dorsal surfaces of a monkeypox case in a patient who was displaying the appearance of the characteristic rash during its recuperative stage. Photo: AFP

 

The number of monkeypox cases has risen to 157 in the country, according to health authorities.

In its situation report for week 30, the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) said the cases were recorded across 26 states since January.

From January 1 to July 31, 2022, NCDC said four deaths were recorded from 4 states – Delta (1), Lagos (1), Ondo (1) and Akwa Ibom (1).

READ ALSO: US Declares Monkeypox A Public Health Emergency

The report also showed that there were at least 413 suspected cases of the disease in the country.

It stated that for last week, 56 suspected cases were reported across 19 states, with Ondo topping the list after recording 13 cases.

“There were fifty-six (56) new suspected cases reported in Epi week 30, 2022 (25th to 31st July 2022) from nineteen (19) states – Ondo (13), Plateau (8), Lagos (6), Adamawa (4), Abia (3), Borno (3), Delta (2), Kano (3), Anambra (2), Bayelsa (2) , Kwara (2), Akwa Ibom (1), Gombe (1), Imo (1), Nasarawa (1), Osun (1), Oyo (1), Rivers (1) and Taraba (1),” the report read in part.

“Of fifty-six (56)suspected cases, there were twenty-four(24) new confirmed positive cases in Epi week 30, 2022 from twelve (12) states – Ondo (5), Kano (3), Lagos (3), Abia (2), Adamawa (2), Bayelsa (2), Kwara (2), Delta (1), Anambra (1), Gombe (1), Rivers (1) and Nasarawa (1).

“From 1st January to 31st July 2022, there have now been 413 suspected cases and 157 confirmed cases (105 male, 52 female) from twenty-six (26) states – Lagos (20), Ondo (14), Adamawa (13), Delta (12), Bayelsa (12), Rivers (11), Edo (8), Nasarawa (8), Plateau (6), Anambra (6), FCT (5), Taraba (5), Kwara (5), Kano (5), Imo (4), Cross River (3), Borno (3), Oyo (3), Abia (3), Gombe (3), Katsina (2), Kogi (2), Niger (1), Ogun (1), Bauchi (1) and Akwa Ibom (1).

“Four deaths were recorded from 4 states – Delta (1), Lagos (1), Ondo (1) and Akwa Ibom (1).

“Overall, since the re-emergence of monkeypox in September 2017 and to 31st July 2022, a total of 925 suspected cases have been reported from 35 states in the country.”

Monkeypox is a rare viral zoonotic infectious disease transmitted from animals to humans that occur sporadically, primarily in remote villages of Central and West Africa near tropical rainforests.

Nigeria is one of the countries in Africa where the disease is endemic.

NCDC Probes Mystery Illness In Delta

A file photo of an NCDC official and two others on duty.

 

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) has commenced an investigation into a mystery illness in Delta State.

Just last week, a student was said to have died with nine others hospitalised after the outbreak of an ailment in Boji-Boji Owa, in the Ika North-East Local Government Area of the state.

READ ALSO: WHO Declares Monkeypox Global Emergency, Triggers Highest Alert

In a short statement on its Twitter handle, the health agency said it is aware of the strange illness reported among secondary school children in the state and is investigating the situation.

NCDC said it is collaborating with the Federal Ministry of Education, Federal Ministry of Health and the Delta State Ministry of Health.

It also pledged to update Nigerians on the situation.

“The NCDC is aware of an unknown illness reported among secondary school children in Delta State,” the agency tweeted.

“We are in touch with @NigEducation, @Fmohnigeria & Delta State Ministry of Health to investigate and respond accordingly. We will communicate with Nigerians as the situation evolves.”

 

Meanwhile, the World Health Organization on Saturday declared the monkeypox outbreak, which has affected nearly 16,000 people in 72 countries, to be a global health emergency — the highest alarm it can sound.

“I have decided that the global #monkeypox outbreak represents a public health emergency of international concern,” WHO chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said at a press conference.

He said a committee of experts who met on Thursday was unable to reach a consensus, so it fell on him to decide whether to trigger the highest alert possible.

“WHO’s assessment is that the risk of monkeypox is moderate globally and in all regions, except in the European region where we assess the risk as high,” he added.

Monkeypox has affected over 15,800 people in 72 countries, according to a tally by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) published on July 20.

A surge in monkeypox infections has been reported since early May outside the West and Central African countries where the disease has long been endemic.

NCDC On High Alert After Confirmation Of Marburg Virus In Ghana

Margus outbreaks are often associated with exposure to colonies of Rousettus bats (Photo: YASSER AL-ZAYYAT AFP)

 

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (NCDC) says it is on a high alert after Marburg Virus was detected in Ghana.

NCDC Director-General Dr Ifedayo Adetifa said this in a statement on Tuesday.

The outbreak in Ghana was confirmed by the World Health Organisation (WHO) on Monday and represents the second time the virus will be detected in West Africa. It had been detected in Guinea in August 2021.

READ ALSO: Ghana Reports Two Suspected Cases Of Marburg Virus

Two unrelated males aged 26 and 51 in Ghana were confirmed have been infected by the virus which causes a rare, highly infectious disease and severe haemorrhagic fever (MVD) in humans and non-human primates just like the Ebola virus. Both men died from the disease. There is currently no cure for the virus.

“Given the proximity of Ghana to Nigeria as well as the WHO alert, the NCDC-led multisectoral National Emerging Viral Haemorrhagic Diseases Working Group (EVHDWG) that coordinates preparedness efforts for MVD, and other emerging viral haemorrhagic diseases has conducted a rapid risk assessment to guide in-country preparedness activities,” NCDC Director-General, Dr Adetifa, said in the statement.

“Based on available data, the overall risk of both importation of the disease and its potential impact on the Nigerian population is said to be moderate as assessed by NCDC experts and partners given the following: the proximity (same region), high traffic from Ghana and countries that share borders with Ghana, the incubation period of 21 days of the virus, heightened surveillance at point of entry, Nigeria’s capacity to respond to the outbreak in the country and the fact that persons with MVD transmit the virus when they become symptomatic unlike for SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19 that can also be transmitted by infected persons without symptoms.”

According to the NCDC DG, Nigeria has the capacity to test for the disease that was first discovered in 1967 after outbreaks in Marburg and Frankfurt, Germany.

Testing for the virus can currently be done at the National Reference Laboratory in Abuja and the University of Lagos Teaching Hospital laboratory Centre for Human and Zoonotic Virology.

Dr Adetifa added, “Diagnostic capacity can be scaled up to other laboratories if required. Nigeria has the resources (human, technical and laboratory) for prompt identification and management in the event of a single imported case.”

Even with the measures in place including increased surveillance by the authorities in neighbouring Benin Republic and Togo, the NCDC boss believes changes may be needed.

“The response situation may change in the coming days with the control efforts in Ghana and advisories as may be issued by the World Health Organisation. In addition, many of the contacts under follow-up in Ghana will soon exit the 21-day quarantine period and so far, there have been no secondary cases reported,” he said.

The NCDC DG urged Nigerians to adhere strictly to preventive the following preventive measures.

  • Avoid non-essential travel to locations where the outbreak is reported for the moment

 

  • Avoid direct contact with blood, saliva, vomit, urine, and other bodily fluids of people with suspected or confirmed Marburg virus disease

 

  • Avoid the animal reservoir (fruit bats), other sick animals.

 

  • Ensure all persons with the symptoms described above are promptly taken to healthcare facilities for diagnosis and initiation of supportive treatment

 

  • In suspected and/or confirmed MVD cases, direct physical contact should be avoided by ensuring strict isolation, the use of protective gowns, masks, gloves and safe disposal of needles, bedding, and other contaminated materials

 

  • Strict practice of infection prevention control in the healthcare setting for all suspected patients.

 

  • Male survivors of Marburg virus disease should practice safer sexual practices and hygiene for 12 months from onset of symptoms or until their semen test negative twice for the virus

 

 

Read the NCDC’s full statement below:

NCDC on High Alert Following Second Incidence of Marburg Virus Disease Detected in West Africa

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (NCDC) is aware of the declaration of an outbreak of Marburg virus disease (MVD) in Ghana confirmed by the World Health Organization (WHO) on the 17th of July 2022. This is the second time this zoonotic disease has been detected in West Africa following the previous incidence in Guinea in August 2021. The cases were reported in two unrelated males – 26 and a 51 years old – who both died from the disease. The disease was first discovered in 1967 following outbreaks in Marburg and Frankfurt in Germany, and Belgrade, Serbia. Since then, outbreaks and sporadic cases have been reported in some African countries.

Ghanaian public health officials are responding with support from WHO to halt the spread of the disease. Given the proximity of Ghana to Nigeria as well as the WHO alert, the NCDC-led multisectoral National Emerging Viral Haemorrhagic Diseases Working Group (EVHDWG) that coordinates preparedness efforts for MVD, and other emerging viral haemorrhagic diseases has conducted a rapid risk assessment to guide in-country preparedness activities.

Based on available data, the overall risk of both importation of the disease and its potential impact on the Nigerian population is said to be Moderate as assessed by NCDC experts and partners given the following: the proximity (same region), high traffic from Ghana and countries that share borders with Ghana, the incubation period of 21 days of the virus, heightened surveillance at point of entry, Nigeria’s capacity to respond to the outbreak in country and the fact that persons with MVD transmit the virus when they become symptomatic unlike for SARS-CoV-2 that causes COVID-19 that can also be transmitted by infected persons without symptoms.

Nigeria has the capacity to test for the virus presently at the National Reference Laboratory in Abuja and the University of Lagos Teaching Hospital laboratory Centre for Human and Zoonotic Virology. Diagnostic capacity can be scaled up to other laboratories if required. Nigeria has the resources (human, technical and laboratory) for prompt identification and management in the event of a single imported case.

However, the risk of importation may be further reduced as the current situation in Ghana is under control as reported by Ghana Health Service. Active case finding is ongoing in Ghana while there is heightened surveillance in Togo and Benin. Therefore, the response situation may change in the coming days with the control efforts in Ghana and advisories as may be issued by the World Health Organisation. In addition, many of the contacts under follow-up in Ghana will soon exit the 21-day quarantine period and so far, there have been no secondary cases reported.

Currently, no case of Marburg virus disease has been reported in Nigeria. However, several measures are being put in place to prevent an outbreak of the disease in-country. The National Reference Laboratory has the capacity to test for MVD, point of entry surveillance has been heightened, trained rapid response teams are on standby to be deployed in the event of an outbreak and the NCDC’s Incident Coordination Centre (ICC) is in alert mode. The NCDC is also amplifying risk communication efforts and continues to work with States and partners to strengthen preparedness activities which include– review of risk communication protocols, plans and messages in the event of an outbreak.

About Marburg Virus Disease (MVD)

The Marburg virus causes a rare, highly infectious disease and severe haemorrhagic fever (MVD) in humans and non-human primates just like the Ebola virus, its closest relation and only other member of the Filoviridae family of viruses. It is another example of a zoonosis such as Lassa fever, etc. The natural animal reservoir/host are fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus). Following the transmission from infected animals to humans, it spreads in humans through direct contact with the bodily fluids of infected people, and contaminated materials and surfaces. The virus can enter the body through broken skin or mucous membranes in the eyes, nose, or mouth.

The initial symptoms of the disease include sudden onset of fever (Temp ≥37.5OC), chills, headache, body aches which may be accompanied by a rash, most prominent on the chest, back and stomach, nausea/vomiting, chest pain, sore throat, abdominal pain by the fifth day of illness. Increase in severity of illness can be heralded by the appearance of severe watery diarrhoea, jaundice, inflammation of the pancreas, severe weight loss, bleeding from multiple areas, delirium, shock, liver failure, massive haemorrhaging, and multi-organ dysfunction and/or failure. In fatal cases, death occurs often between 8 and 9 days after symptom onset. The case fatality rate for MVD is estimated to be 24% to 88%.

The Marburg virus is known to persist in the body – placenta, amniotic fluid, foetus of infected pregnant women, breast milk of women who were infected while breastfeeding and semen – of persons who have recovered from MVD.

Nigerians are urged to adhere strictly to the following preventive measures

  • Avoid non-essential travel to locations where the outbreak is reported for the moment.
  • Avoid direct contact with blood, saliva, vomit, urine, and other bodily fluids of people with suspected or confirmed Marburg virus disease.
  • Avoid the animal reservoir (fruit bats), other sick animals.
  • Ensure all persons with the symptoms described above are promptly taken to healthcare facilities for diagnosis and initiation of supportive treatment/
  • In suspected and/or confirmed MVD cases, direct physical contact should be avoided by ensuring strict isolation, the use of protective gowns, masks, gloves and safe disposal of needles, bedding, and other contaminated materials.
  • Strict practice of infection prevention control in the healthcare setting for all suspected patients.
  • Male survivors of Marburg virus disease should practice safer sexual practices and hygiene for 12 months from onset of symptoms or until their semen test negative twice for the virus.

Infections have been recorded in health facilities and in healthcare workers while looking after patients with suspected or confirmed MVD. This is mostly due to poor adherence to infection prevention and control (IPC) measures. Therefore, healthcare workers are urged to maintain a high index of suspicion for the disease and always observe standard precautions.

There is currently no treatment or vaccine for MVD, however, infected persons can benefit from supportive care and treatment of specific symptoms which improve the chances of survival. Early detection and treatment improve prognosis. Anyone who travels to a location where an outbreak has been reported or had contact with a confirmed case or sick individual of unknown source of illness should observe self-isolation for 21 days and call the NCDC hotline (6232) immediately if symptomatic.

For further information on Marburg virus disease, visit the NCDC website via – https://ncdc.gov.ng/diseases/info/M.

Signed:

Dr. Ifedayo Adetifa

Director General

Nigeria Centre for Disease Control

NCDC Confirms 357 New COVID-19 Cases In Three Days

A file photo of a health worker wearing a PPE on duty.

 

Nigeria has confirmed 357 new cases of COVID-19 amid the wave of fresh infections resurging in parts of the country.

The number of new cases has continued to rise as authorities have yet to restore the relaxed measures initially put in place to curb the spread of the disease.

In a tweet on Tuesday, the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) explained that the fresh infections were confirmed between July 9 and 11.

These cases, it stated, were reported in five states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT).

Lagos State had the highest number of infections – 292 and was followed by Yobe – 25, Rivers – 20, FCT – 11, Kano – seven, and Delta – two.

According to the NCDC, four states comprising Abia, Kaduna, Plateau, and Sokoto recorded zero cases within the period.

This brings the total number of confirmed cases in the country to 258,874 since the first COVID-19 case was reported in late February 2020.

Of the confirmed cases, 250,456 people have been discharged while the number of those who died from complications relating to the disease stands at 3,144.

Read the tweet below:

NCDC Warns Against Fifth COVID-19 Wave As Nigerians Prepare For Eid Celebrations

A file photo of an NCDC official and two others on duty.

 

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) on Friday issued a public health advisory amid the recent increase in COVID-19 cases in the country and globally.

“This is based on the prevailing risk from the virus and the need for religious organisations, community leaders, and Nigerians, in general, to take necessary precautions ahead of the upcoming Eid-el-Kabir celebrations,” it said, adding that the number of weekly COVID-19 cases has increased globally for the third consecutive week – according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).

“Similarly, our national surveillance system has detected a gradual increase in the daily COVID-19 cases recorded in the country. Although confirmed cases increased from 267 to 445 between weeks 21 to 24, hospitalisation and fatalities have remained low suggesting these are mostly mild to moderate cases or we are in the lag phase before we see the accompanying increase in severe disease and hospitalisation.”

Since Nigeria’s first case was detected on 27th February 2020, authorities have confirmed 256,695 cases with 3,144 deaths across the 36 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT).

Genomic surveillance, according to the NCDC, confirms omicron and its various offspring (sub lineages) remain the dominant circulating variant of concern associated with the spread of the disease in the country.

It explained that the recent increase in cases may be in part or whole due to increased testing over the last few weeks, increased circulation of omicron sub-lineages (BA.4 and BA.5 as seen elsewhere), an increase in seasonal illness with cold and cough symptoms, as well as poor adherence to preventive measures such as the use of masks.

Authorities said they have continued to maintain active surveillance and support states to ensure that access to testing was provided for prompt management of confirmed cases, and coordinate genomic surveillance to detect emerging variants.

“Our focus is to ensure response continuity for COVID-19 and improve our health system while giving needed attention to other priorities within our mandate including the ongoing monkeypox response,” the agency said.

“In addition to the COVID-19 situation in Nigeria and globally, the upcoming Eid-El-Kabir celebrations against a backdrop of suboptimal COVID-19 vaccination uptake and increasing COVID-19 case numbers calls for increased individual and collective responsibility.

“The virus that causes COVID-19 is more likely to spread in mass gatherings and when people do not adhere to preventive measures such as physical distancing, mask use, and hand hygiene. As we celebrate, we urge Nigerians to prevent the onset of a full-fledged fifth COVID-19 wave by remaining mindful of the high risk of spread of COVID-19 and acting in tandem by adhering to recommended public health safety measures.”

NCDC Confirms 347 New COVID-19 Cases

In this file photo, a healthcare worker prepares to administer a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine to a person in Miami, Florida. Joe Raedle/Getty Images/AFP

 

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) has confirmed 347 new cases of COVID-19 with Lagos topping the list of states.

Data from the NCDC late on Friday showed that new infections were reported in seven states and the Federal Capital Territory.

Lagos had 265 cases, a wide margin from Imo which had the second-highest number of cases with 47 infections.

Other states with fresh cases are Rivers – 15, Edo – 11, FCT – 4, Akwa Ibom – 2, Plateau – 2, and Bayelsa – 1.

READ ALSO: Covid Vaccines Saved 20 Million Lives In First Year – Study

The new cases take the country’s total infections to 257,637, and the death toll to 3,144.

Of the 257,637 cases recorded since the outbreak of the pandemic in Nigeria in February 2020, Lagos State accounts for 100,641 infections followed by the FCT and the Rivers with 28,763 and 16,826 cases, respectively.

States AffectedNo. of Cases (Lab Confirmed)No. of Cases (on admission)No. DischargedNo. of Deaths
Lagos100,6411,81098,062769
FCT28,7636328,451249
Rivers16,82612716,545154
Kaduna11,314711,21889
Plateau10,258210,18175
Oyo10,232110,029202
Edo7,707117,375321
Ogun5,810115,71782
Delta5,4131325,170111
Ondo5,1733154,749109
Kano5,087494,911127
Akwa Ibom4,659294,58644
Kwara4,6404014,17564
Osun3,311363,18392
Gombe3,307833,15866
Enugu2,952132,91029
Anambra2,825462,76019
Nasarawa2,7383542,34539
Imo2,64882,58258
Katsina2,41802,38137
Abia2,17712,14234
Benue2,1293401,76425
Ebonyi2,064282,00432
Ekiti2,006521,92628
Bauchi1,96711,94224
Borno1,62951,58044
Taraba1,473621,37734
Bayelsa1,32111,29228
Adamawa1,203681,10332
Niger1,14813099820
Cross River842880925
Sokoto818079028
Jigawa669264918
Yobe60906009
Kebbi4801045416
Zamfara37503669
Kogi5032

Cholera: Nigeria Records 54 Deaths, 1,862 Cases In 16 States

A file photo of an NCDC official and two others on duty.

 

No fewer than 54 people have died of Cholera disease in the country, the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) has said.

In its latest report on the outbreak of the disease, the NCDC stated that the deaths were recorded between January 1 and May 1, 2022.

It added that over 1,800 suspected cases were reported in 77 local government areas across 16 states of the country.

The states are Abia, Adamawa, Akwa Ibom, Bauchi, Bayelsa, Borno, Cross River, Katsina, Kebbi, Kwara, Lagos, Nasarawa, Ondo, Rivers, Taraba, and Zamfara.

READ ALSO: Cholera Has Killed Twice As Many People As COVID-19 In 2021 – NCDC Data

“As of 1st May 2022, a total of 1,861 suspected cases, including 54 deaths (CFR2.9%) have been reported from 16 states in 2022,” the report said. “Of the suspected cases since the beginning of the year, age group <5 years is the most affected age group for male and female.

“Of all suspected cases, 50% are males and 50% are females. Three states – Taraba (615 cases), Cross River (593) and Katsina (134 cases) account for 72% of all cumulative cases.”

According to the health agency, 12 local government areas across six states reported more than 30 cases each this year.

These comprise five in Cross River, three in Taraba, as well as one each in Bayelsa, Katsina, Kebbi, and Rivers State.

 

Cholera, an acute diarrheal illness caused by infection of the intestine, is contracted when patients swallow food or water contaminated with cholera bacteria.

Although the infection is often mild or without symptoms, it can be severe and life-threatening sometimes.

Last year, the NCDC said the number of people who died of cholera was twice as many as those killed by COVID-19.

Data from the agency indicated that while the death toll from cholera in 2021 was 3,604, the figure of those who died of COVID-19 complications was 1,750.

“Sadly, cholera has actually killed more people than COVID so far,” NCDC Director-General, Dr Ifedayo Adetifa, had said during an interview on Channels Television’s Sunrise Daily in December 2021.

Lassa Fever: Edo, Ondo Record New Deaths As Nigeria’s Toll Hits 151

A file photo of an NCDC official and two others on duty.

 

Edo and Ondo States have recorded new deaths from Lassa fever as Nigeria’s toll from the disease, since the beginning of 2022, rises to 151.

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) disclosed this in its latest situation report on the outbreak of the disease in the country.

Data from the report for Week 18, which covered May 2 to 8, revealed that two more deaths were reported in the week under review.

“In week 18, the number of new confirmed cases decreased from 8 in week 17, 2022 to 3 cases,” the NCDC said. “These were reported from Edo, Ondo and Benue States.

“Cumulatively from week 1 to week 18, 2022, 151 deaths have been reported with a case fatality rate (CFR) of 19.8 per cent which is lower than the CFR for the same period in 2021 (20.6 per cent).”

 

Lassa fever is an acute viral illness and a viral haemorrhagic fever first reported in the Lassa community in Borno State when two missionary nurses died from an unusual febrile illness.

Since then, Nigeria has continued to report cases and outbreaks and the disease is increasingly recognised to be endemic in many parts of West Africa such as Benin Republic, Ghana, Mali and the Mano River region (Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea).

The new death each reported in the two states brings the toll in Ondo and Edo to 38 and 27 respectively. While both states recorded the most fatalities in 2022, Ebonyi is the third state with the highest death toll – 18.

Apart from these states, only 13 others have recorded at least one death from Lassa fever. They include Taraba – 14, Bauchi – 12, Benue and Gombe – eight, Kogi – seven, Nasarawa – six, Oyo – four, Kaduna – three, Enugu – two, as well as Anambra, Cross River, Kano, and Katsina – one.

 

According to the NCDC, a total of 72 new cases were suspected in 11 states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT), but just three cases were confirmed in three states – Edo, Ondo, and Benue, and no new healthcare worker was affected.

“In total for 2022, 23 states have recorded at least one confirmed case across 95 Local Government Areas,” it added. “Of all confirmed cases, 68 per cent are from Ondo (28 per cent), Edo (25 per cent),  and Bauchi (15 per cent) States.

“The predominant age group affected is 21 – 30 years (range: <1 to 90 years, Median Age: 30 years). The male to female ratio for confirmed cases is 1:0.9. The number of suspected cases has increased compared to that reported for the same period in 2021.”

Lassa virus is transmitted to man by infected multi-mammate rats and humans become infected from direct contact with the urine and faeces of the rat carrying the virus.

People also contract the disease by touching soiled objects, eating contaminated food, or exposure to open cuts or sores.

Secondary transmission from person to person can also occur as a result of exposure to the virus in the blood, tissue, urine, faeces or other bodily secretions of an infected patient.

Lassa Fever Has Claimed More Lives This Year Than In 2021 – Report

Death Toll Rises To 75, As NCDC Confirms 355 Cases Of Lassa Fever
File photo

 

Lassa fever, one of the most deadly diseases in Nigeria, has continued to kill more people in various parts of the country.

Although authorities say they have continued to monitor the disease outbreak, it appears more needs to be done to adequately contain its spread. The focus has been curbing the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic which brought the world to its knees in 2020.

Analysis conducted by Channels Television indicated that the number of people killed by the disease by mid-March has surpassed the death toll recorded in the whole of 2021.

Lassa fever is an acute viral illness and a viral haemorrhagic fever first reported in the Lassa community in Borno State when two missionary nurses died from an unusual febrile illness, according to the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC).

READ ALSO: NCDC Alerts States As Lassa Fever Death Toll Hits 102

 

Since that time, the country has continued to report cases and outbreaks, even as people contract the disease by touching soiled objects, eating contaminated food, or exposure to open cuts or sores.

Secondary transmission from person to person can also occur as a result of exposure to the virus in the blood, tissue, urine, faeces, or other bodily secretions of an infected patient.

As of March 13 – representing about 10 weeks into 2022, 112 people died of Lassa fever. This figure exceeds the 102 infected persons killed by the disease in the whole of the 52 weeks of the previous year.

 

In its situation report on the disease released on Thursday, the NCDC disclosed that one new death was reported in week 10 – covering March 7 to 13. Also in the same week, a total of 257 suspected cases were reported, but only 33 of them came back positive.

The new infections were reported from 22 local government areas of nine states namely: Edo, Ondo, Ebonyi, Kogi, Gombe, Nasarawa, Taraba, Bauchi, and Kebbi.

Cumulatively, in week 10, 630 cases were confirmed so far from the 3,079 infections reported, and 112 people have so far died. At least half of these figures were reported in the 10th week of the year 2021 when 1,211 cases of Lassa fever were reported out of which 191 infections were confirmed with 42 deaths reported.

 

In its latest report, the NCDC said at least one case has been confirmed across 87 local government areas of 23 states in the country so far in 2022. Of all confirmed cases, 70 per cent are from Ondo (30 per cent), Edo (24 per cent), and Bauchi (16 per cent). It is, however, unclear if the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) has any positive infection.

The predominant age group affected is 21-30 years (Range:1 to 80 years, Median Age: 30 years), while the male to female ratio for confirmed cases is 1:0.8. According to the agency, no new healthcare worker was affected in reporting week 10.

It added that the National Lassa fever multi-partner, multi-sectoral, and Emergency Coordination Centre (EOC) has been activated to coordinate response activities at all levels.

60 Ukraine Returnees Test Positive For COVID-19

Nigeria joins a list of African nations that have evacuated their citizens in the wake of the Russian invasion. Photo: Sodiq Adelakun/Channels TV.

 

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) reports that 60 Nigerians evacuated from Ukraine have tested positive for COVID-19.

The NCDC’s data revealed that 24 hours after making known the lowest daily figure ever recorded since the outbreak in 2020, two cases. Just a day after, it recorded 118 new infections.

The statistics show that the Nigerian returnees from Ukraine contributed to the surge, as they accounted for a total of 60 out of the whole amount.

772 evacuees returned to Nigeria on March 4, 2022, through Max Air and Air Peace, following the invasion of Ukraine by Russia on February 24.

Since the invasion, there have been reported casualties from both countries, leading many residents of Ukraine, including Nigerians, to flee to neighbouring countries.

The Nigerian government had approved the release of $8.5 million for the prompt evacuation of at least 5,000 Nigerians fleeing the Russian-Ukrainian conflict zone to Poland, Romania, Hungary, and Slovakia.

NCDC Reports 35 New COVID-19 Cases In Five States, FCT

A file photo of a health worker writing on a paper. Channels TV/ Sodiq Adelakun.

 

A total of 35 new cases of COVID-19 were reported from five states and the Federal Capital Territory (FCT) on Friday.

The Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) confirmed this on its verified Twitter handle on Saturday while giving an update on the outbreak of the disease in the country.

Of the new cases reported on February 4, Rivers State reported the highest infections of 15 and was followed by Katsina – eight, and FCT – six.

Others are Gombe State – four, Ekiti States – one, and Kano State – one.

No new death was recorded, according to the health agency.

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It revealed that 67 infected people being treated in the community were discharged in the nation’s capital on Friday. No new case was reported in Abia, Delta, Ogun, Ondo, Osun, Oyo, and Sokoto States.


 


Since the country recorded its first cases in February 2020, the NCDC has confirmed a total of 253,540 cases from the over 4,116,369 samples collected and tested so far.

Of the confirmed cases, 229,982 people who tested positive for the disease have recovered and have been discharged while the nation’s death toll stands at 3,136.

While the NCDC has yet to update the data on its dedicated website as of 10am on Saturday, Channels Television observed that there are 20,476 active cases of COVID-29 in various parts of the country.

In its resolve to attain herd immunity against the virus, the Federal Government has continued to receive more donations of vaccines from various international bodies.

Authorities have also stressed the need for people to comply with the measures put in place to curb the spread of the disease.

These include the mandatory use of face masks in public places, maintaining social distancing, and restriction of crowds in places of worship and social gatherings, among others.