Rain Hinders Buhari From Inaugurating Hospital In Daura

Buhari Mourns George Bush, Condoles With U.S.
President Muhammadu Buhari (file).

 

 

A heavy rain has hindered President Muhammadu Buhari from inaugurating a Reference Hospital in Daura.

The President was expected to commission the medical facility his home town in Katsina State on Thursday but was prevented by the downpour.

The hospital was built by the Nigerian Air Force to respond to the healthcare need of the people of Daura.

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Apart from the inauguration of the hospital, the President is also expected to commission two road projects built by the Katsina State government in Sandamu and Dutsi Local Government Areas of the state.

They are Fago-Katsayal-Kwasarawa-Jirdede-Koza Road with a length of 38 kilometres in Sandamu and 22-kilometre Kwanar Sabke-Dan Aunai-Dutsi Road in Dutsi.

Governor Aminu Masari had promised to embark on the projects during his electioneering campaign ahead of the 2015 general elections.

He explained that the project was designed to increase accessibility by users for easy evacuation of farm produce and to increase access to health, education and other public facilities.

While was unable to inaugurate the hospital, the President commissioned the Fago-Katsayal-Kwasarawa-Jirdede-Koza Road.

Floods Hit Parts Of Lagos After Heavy Rains

 

Floods have taken over parts of Lagos State following an early morning heavy rainfall in the nation’s commercial hub.

This has caused activities to get off to a slow start as traffic was moving at a very slow pace on most major roads.

Some of the major areas affected include the Alfred Rewane Road in Ikoyi, where rainstorm uprooted trees which fell on moving cars.

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Apongbon axis in Lagos Island and Toyin Street in Ikeja were equally affected.

The rain, which lasted for more than one hour in some places, also left several roads flooded making it difficult for motorists and commuters to move.

At the Ogudu end of the Lagos-Ibadan Expressway, traffic was almost at a standstill as rainwater took over the road, forcing motorists to move at a very slow pace.

See photos below:

‘Unprecedented’ Flooding To Hit Northeast Australia

People run through water flooding a street in Glendale, California on February 2, 2019. Southern California is enduring three back-to-back storms bringing heavy rains and wreaking havoc in the normally dry climate.
Robyn Beck / AFP

 

Thousands of people in northeast Australia should expect “unprecedented flooding”, authorities have warned, after relentless downpours forced a dam to be fully opened on Sunday.

Once-in-a-century floods have turned streets into rivers and caused thousands to abandon their homes in Townsville, in Queensland state.

Australia’s tropical north experiences heavy rains during the monsoon season at this time of the year, but the recent downpour has surged far above normal levels.

The Bureau of Meteorology late Sunday issued a “major flood warning”, announcing that spillway gates at the Ross River dam had been opened to their maximum setting and a rapid rise in the water level was predicted to follow.

“Dangerous and high velocity flows will occur in the Ross River Sunday night into Monday. Unprecedented areas of flooding will occur in Townsville,” a statement said, adding there was a “risk to life and property”.

Many homes in the city had already been left without power and cut off by flooded roads.

More severe weather could whip up tornadoes and destructive winds in the days ahead, Bureau of Meteorology state manager Bruce Gunn told reporters.

Up to 20,000 homes are at risk of being inundated if the rains continue.

Military personnel were delivering tens of thousands of sandbags to affected locals, as Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk warned residents to be careful.

“It’s basically not just a one in 20-year event, it’s a one in 100-year event,” she told reporters Saturday.

A year’s worth of rain

The Bureau of Meteorology said a slow-moving monsoonal trough was sitting above Queensland, with some areas expected to receive more than a year’s worth of rain before conditions ease.

Bureau meteorologist Adam Blazak told AFP the downpours could continue until Thursday, while floodwaters would take some time to recede even when the rains lessen.

The region receives an average of about 2,000 millimetres (6.5 feet) of rain annually but some towns were already on track to pass that.

The town of Ingham, north of Townsville, received 506 mm of rain in 24 hours between Saturday and Sunday, of which 145 mm fell in just one hour, Blazak said.

“I’ve never seen anything like this,” Townsville resident Chris Brookehouse told national broadcaster ABC, adding that his house was flooded with water more than one metre deep.

“The volume of water is just incredible. Downstairs is gone, the fridge and freezer are floating. Another five or six steps and upstairs is gone too.”

Blazak said that with adverse weather predicted to continue for up to 72 hours, some regions could see record-breaking levels of rainfall.

There has been a silver lining to the deluge, with drought-stricken farmers in western Queensland boosted by the soaking.

“It is a welcome relief, especially in our western communities, to not only get the rain but also to fill up their dams,” Palaszczuk said Sunday.

“We’re getting food supplies in there. We still have many roads that are cut around those areas.”

The deluge comes amid a severe drought in the eastern inland of the vast Australian continent, including parts of Queensland state, that has left graziers struggling to stay afloat.

Extreme heatwaves during the southern hemisphere summer have led to maximum-temperature records being broken in some towns.

High temperatures are not unusual in Australia during its arid southern hemisphere summer, with bushfires a common occurrence.

But scientists say climate change has pushed up land and sea temperatures and led to more extremely hot days and severe fire seasons.

In the southern states of Victoria and Tasmania, firefighters in recent days have been battling numerous bushfires threatening homes and communities.

India’s Devastating Rains Match Climate Change Forecasts

Marooned buildings on the banks of overflowing Pampa river are pictured in the flood waters in Alappuzha District in the south Indian state of Kerala, on August 21, 2018. MANJUNATH KIRAN / AFP

 

Once-a-century rains that have pounded the Indian state of Kerala and displaced 1.3 million people are in line with the predictions of climate scientists, who warn that worse is to come if global warming continues unabated.

The monsoon rains upon which farmers in the southwestern state depend for their food and livelihoods dumped two-and-a-half times the normal amount of water across the state last week, according to Indian meteorologists.

It is difficult to attribute any single extreme weather event — such as the Kerala flooding — to climate change, said Roxy Mathew Koll, a climate scientist at the Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology in Pashan, near Mumbai.

At the same time, “our recent research shows a three-fold increase in widespread extreme rains during 1950-2017, leading to large-scale flooding,” he told AFP.

Across India, flooding caused by heavy monsoons rainfall claimed 69,000 lives and left 17 million people without homes over the same period, according to a study he co-authored, published last year in Nature Communications.

In Kerala, all 35 of the state’s major reservoirs were brimming with rainwater by August 10, forcing local authorities to open the sluice gates on the Idukki Dam for the first time in 26 years.

“These floods that we are seeing in Kerala right now are basically in line with climate projections,” said Kira Vinke, a scientist at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research in Germany.

“If we continue with current levels of emissions — which is not unlikely — we will have unmanageable risks,” she told AFP.

The weather patterns behind these destructive downpours are well understood, even if the fingerprint of global warming is still hard to distinguish from what scientists call “natural variability”.

Rapid warming in the Arabian Sea and nearby landmass causes monsoon winds to fluctuate and intensify for short spans of three-to-four days, Koll explained.

During those periods, moisture from the Arabian Sea is dumped inland.

South Asia’s ‘hotspots’

“Over the last decade, due to climate change, the overheating of landmass leads to the intensification of monsoon rainfalls in central and southern India,” said monsoon expert Elena Surovyatkina, a professor at the Russian Academy of Sciences, and a senior scientist at PIK.

The changes observed so far have occurred after an increase in Earth’s average surface temperature of only one degree Celsius (1.8 degrees Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels.

On current trends, India’s average annual temperatures are set to rise 1.5 C to 3 C compared to that benchmark by mid-century, according to a World Bank report entitled “South Asia’s Hotspots”.

“If no corrective measures are taken, changing rainfall patterns and rising temperatures will cost India 2.8 percent of its GDP and will drag down living standards of half its population by 2050,” the World Bank said in a statement.

The 196-nation Paris climate treaty calls for capping global warming at “well below” 2 C (3.6 F), and 1.5 C if possible.

But voluntary national pledges to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, even if respected, would still see temperatures rise at least 3 C.

Flooding is not the only problem India’s burgeoning — and highly vulnerable — population will face as a consequence of global warming.

“What we will see with climate change in India is that the wet season is going to be wetter and the dry season drier,” said Vinki.

“Already we are observing that the monsoon is becoming harder to predict with traditional methods.”

If manmade carbon emissions continue unabated, some regions in northeast India could literally become unlivable by the end of the century due to a deadly combination of heat and humidity during heatwaves, recent research has projected.

Indeed, large swathes of South Asia, including the Ganges-Brahmaputra Basin, could approach the threshold for survivability outdoors.

Coastal cities, meanwhile, are especially vulnerable to sea level rise, driven by melting ice sheets and expanding ocean water, on the one hand, and subsidence due to over-development and the depletion of water tables, on the other.

AFP

Heavy Rain Kills 9 In Central, South China

Heavy Rain Kills 9 In Central, South China

Heavy rainfall in China’s Hunan Province and Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region has claimed a total of nine lives and one missing, local authorities said on Monday.

The rainwater, which accumulated in Hunan’s Shaoyang City and Guangxi’s Rongshui Miao Autonomous County, has turned the two places into Asian Venice, a well-known Italian city, while locals had to paddle boats to commute between places.

Continuous rainfall in central China’s Hunan since last Friday had left three dead and one missing as of 16:00 Monday, according to the provincial flood control and drought relief headquarters.

About 1,000 houses had collapsed, over 48,800 people were evacuated, and 27,290 hectares of crops were damaged.

Some 20 tourist areas have been temporarily closed in the province due to safety concerns.

In south China’s Guangxi, six people have died after torrential rain over the past week.

More than 2,100 hectares of crops and 368 houses were damaged, leading to a direct economic loss of 82.7 million yuan (approx. 12.4 million U.S. dollars).

Rain, Thunderstorm Kill One, Leave Two In Critical Condition In Port-Harcourt

port-harcourt-rainstormTragedy struck on Monday evening in Port-Harcourt, the capital of Rivers State, when a heavy rain with thunderstorm brought down at least two masts, destroyed bill boards and some roofs in Ikoku Mile 1 community.

A 16-year-old girl, who was said to be with her mother, was killed.

While two others, including the coach of the Community Football team were left with broken skulls and are currently battling for survival at the hospital.rainstrom-in-port-harcourt

The acting Managing Director of the Rivers State Signage and Advertising Agency, Chukwudi Dimkpa, told Channels Television that, “the state government was currently conducting integrity test on poles and bill boards”.

“Those found to have failed to obtain government approvals or to do maintenance will be made to face sanctions,” Chukwudi said.