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Insecurity: Adeboye Calls For Prayers For Nigeria

Ignatius Igwe  
Updated April 28, 2021
RCCG General Overseer, Pastor Enoch Adeboye
A file photo of RCCG General Overseer, Pastor Enoch Adeboye. Credit: Pastor Adeboye/Twitter

 

The General Overseer of the Redeemed Christian Church of God, Pastor Enoch Adeboye, has asked  Nigerians of all tribes and tongues to pray for the country and the rest of the world.

Taking to Twitter on Wednesday, Adeboye begged God to show mercy on Nigeria and heal Africa’s most populous country.

“Keep praying for Nigeria and the rest of the world in these difficult times. It is our prayer that God will have mercy on Nigeria and heal our land in Jesus’ Name,” he said.

His call followed series of attacks in the country, ranging from kidnapping to banditry, terrorism to militancy, cultism to calls for secession among several others.

 

Insecurity in the country seems to have worsened with gunmen attacking security formations in the country.

In the past week, at least 239 people were killed and 44 others kidnapped in separate violent incidents across the country, mostly by armed non-state actors.

The violence is not limited to any state, ethnic group, or religion. It is a general problem that the administration of President Muhammadu Buhari is finding difficult to curb.

READ ALSO: Insecurity: Reps To Audit Military Assets, Ask Buhari To Declare State Of Emergency

Weeks after a new police chief was appointed, suspected Boko Haram terrorists attacked his hometown, Geidam, in Yobe State and hoisted their flag.

The terrorists also attacked Kauri in Niger State, displaced over 3,000 persons and hoisted its flag, forcing the state governor, Bello Abubakar to ask President Buhari to come to his rescue

Nigeria has been experiencing a series of security threats ranging from terrorism, banditry, militancy, cultism among others in several parts of the country.

The country has been battling terrorism for more than a decade which has killed 36,000 people and displaced hundreds of thousands in the northeast.

The Islamic State of West African Province (ISWAP) split from the jihadist group Boko Haram in 2016 and has since become a dominant threat in Nigeria, attacking troops and bases while killing and kidnapping passengers at bogus checkpoints.

On March 1, jihadist fighters burnt down a United Nations humanitarian compound in the town of Dikwa after dislodging troops, killing six civilians.

Nigeria’s jihadist violence has spread to neighbouring Chad, Cameroon and Niger, prompting a regional military coalition to fight the insurgents.