Chelsea on the verge of signing Moses

Chelsea are set to sign Nigeria forward Victor Moses from Wigan after the European champions finally met the Latics’ asking price. The Blues had seen … Continue reading Chelsea on the verge of signing Moses


Chelsea are set to sign Nigeria forward Victor Moses from Wigan after the European champions finally met the Latics’ asking price.

The Blues had seen four bids for Moses rejected by Wigan chairman Dave Whelan during the course of a fractious transfer saga that had lasted since the end of last season.

Whelan had infuriated Chelsea by speaking publicly about the negotiations in a bid to drive up the price.

But Chelsea boss Roberto Di Matteo is on the verge of getting his man at the fifth attempt after Wigan confirmed they have accepted an improved offer and have given the 21-year-old permission to discuss a contract with the west London club.

“The club can confirm that after four unsuccessful bids from Chelsea for Victor Moses, a fifth bid has today finally met the valuation and terms set by Wigan Athletic and been accepted. The player has been given permission to speak with Chelsea,” a statement on Wigan’s website confirmed.

It has been reported that Wigan were demanding around £9 million for Moses, who joined the Latics from Crystal Palace in 2010 and has risen to prominence after a series of impressive displays last season.

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At Chelsea the impression lingers that his role in proceedings would be supposedly far less significant, particularly as he competes with more exotic and heralded summer recruits.

Up front, Fernando Torres will be allowed to try and rediscover his best form. His £50 million price tag has brought unrivalled pressure but also unrivalled patience from club and owner, meaning those looking to usurp him could be waiting a long time.

On the flanks, Hazard’s sparkling start to life in the Premier League has made him, for the moment, what Jose Mourinho might call an “Untouchable”, while Oscar and Marin will be given plenty of opportunity to adjust to the English game. Di Matteo’s use of Ramires and Ryan Bertrand as more conservative wing options would also likely work against Moses.

His choice, then could not be more stark: To continue a virtually guaranteed footballing education on the pitch with Wigan, or to take a leap of faith, and hope he will be inspired rather than overwhelmed by the level of talent which would surround him at his new club.

Moses has been at this crossroads before. In January 2010, as a 19-year-old wonderkid at Crystal Palace, he opted to spurn the reported interest of some of Europe’s elite clubs to join the less glamorous but less intimidating Latics.