Two Feared Killed In Fresh Boko Haram Attack On Borno IDP Camp

Air Force Officer Dismissed For Raping 14-Year-Old IDP

Two people were killed and several wounded when Boko Haram fighters raided a camp for Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in Borno State, emergency services said on Friday.

Dozens of Boko Haram fighters on motorcycles and two motorised rickshaws stormed into Dalori camp on Thursday, shooting people and looting food supplies after overrunning a nearby military base.

“We have recovered two dead bodies from the attack which also left several IDPs (internally displaced persons) with injuries,” said Bello Danbatta, head of security in the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA).

“The insurgents looted and burnt shops in the camp and also carted food supplies from the main store where food aid is stored,” he said.

Dalori, about 15 kilometres (nine miles) from regional capital Maiduguri, houses about 50,000 people.

The Boko Haram fighters attacked the camp after pushing out soldiers at a nearby military base in a shootout, several displaced people said.

“They (Boko Haram) chased the soldiers away and burnt the base before forcing their way into the camp, shouting ‘Allahu Akbar’ (God is Great),” said camp resident Aisa Kyarimi.

“They started shooting and we all fled the camp,” said the mother of three.

Hassan Modu, a civilian militia member guarding the camp, said he ran into the attackers as he tried to flee.

“They were no doubt after looting food,” he said.

Dalori camp and the neighbouring village have been repeatedly targeted in Boko Haram attacks by heavily armed fighters and female suicide bombers.

In January 2016, at least 85 people were killed when militant fighters stormed and torched Dalori village and tried to gain access to the camps.

Despite the government’s insistence that Boko Haram jihadists are near defeat, attacks on civilians and troops persist almost a decade after the insurgency started.

 AFP

Benue Govt Investigates Rape Allegation At IDP Camps

 

The Benue State Government says it is investigating allegations of rape of victims at the Internally Displaced Camps.

This follows the rising menace of rape and gender-based violence wrought against female IDPs often resulting in unwanted pregnancies.

A victim who craved anonymity told Channels Television said a female member of the vigilante group took her away to a waiting security official.

According to her, the security personnel ignored several pleas by some women and forcefully raped her.

Speaking in her native language, she said: “It was night, the man grabbed me and was dragging me towards his vehicle. I pleaded with him to let me go but he refused.

READ ALSO: El-Rufai Asks Air Force To End Attacks On Abuja-Kaduna Highway

“So I gestured towards the direction where I thought there will be people who would rescue me. When we got there, we met only two women in the room who had just put to birth.

“So I held onto the door, but he pulled me away. One of the women in the camps heard my screams and came to plead with him to leave me alone but he wouldn’t listen. Instead, he grabbed me into another shelter where he raped me.”

Although none of the security agencies in the state has reacted to the allegation as at the time of filing this report.

But Speaking to Channels Television, the Executive Secretary of the State Emergency Management Agency, Emmanuel Shior confirmed the incident.

“I am working with security agencies to get to the bottom of the issue in terms of getting evidence against the security personnel that is accused. When we get enough evidence against them, I assure you that we will get them to face the law,” he stated

Kajuru Killings: Kaduna Govt Establishes IDP Camp For Victims

Kajuru LG Chairman, Cafra Caino.

 

The Kaduna State Government has established a camp for the Internally displaced persons recently affected by gunmen attacks in Kajuru Local Government Area of the state.

The development comes a few weeks after Iri, Dogon Noma and Ikirimi communities in the LGA were attacked.

Following the violence, over 3,000 persons have been displaced as a result of the clashes between the Adara people and Fulanis with hundreds of lives and properties worth millions of naira destroyed.

Speaking to journalists while inaugurating the camp located at Maraban Kajuru, the Chairman of the Council, Mr. Cafra Caino, said the state government decided to establish a new camp for the victims to ameliorate their sufferings.

According to him, the government is also trying to prevent them from falling victims of child labour and trafficking.

READ ALSO: Over 3,000 Persons Reportedly Displaced Following Kajuru Attacks

“The local government and the state government through the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) has provided relief materials to the IDPs in identified locations around Kajuru Local Government.

“Some of the displaced persons have been absolved by their host communities and the government is working assiduously to begin the reconstruction of the destroyed settlements to enable the communities to return to their homes.

“When the attacks happened, there were various camps, but currently the local government has collapsed the camps into one camp at KADP building in Maraba, Kajuru which will be the only approved camp.

Esther Mairiga, Kajuru Attack Victim.

“This is due to reports of possible child labour or child trafficking and to avoid the politicisation of the humanitarian situation through propaganda as some individuals have reported picking in children as some domestic workers,” he stated.

Again, Gunmen Attack Three Kajuru Villages In Kaduna

Reacting to the development, Esther Mairiga, who spoke to journalists in Hausa revealed that she is a mother of five and is among the thousands of people affected by the recent attacks in the area.

She escaped the deadly reprisal attack in her village about a month ago.

While taking refuge at Kufana, a neighboring village, she was delivered of triplets, all of them female.

Overstretched Resources, Mass Displacement In Borno Camps Worry UN

A new settlement/ IDP Camp under construction in Borno State.

 

The ongoing insurgency in the North East has continued to take its toll on the people in the affected communities, leaving thousands displaced and helpless.

With the steady increase in the number of displaced persons, resources have become overstretched and among other things, the health risks are at an all-time-high as IDP camps get over-crowded.

Twenty-year-old Aisha Ali who is a mother of three and a divorcee from Monguno Local Government Area in Borno State, is one of the many victims of the insurgency in Nigeria’s North East.

Read Also: Several Reported Dead As Fire Guts Borno IDP Camp

Teary-eyed and carrying her twin babies in each arm, she narrated her ordeal to Channels Television.

 

“I am not originally from this camp. I went to Jiddari where there was a temporary shed for displaced people. So I stayed with a woman I met there. But when they came and killed people we all ran away,” she said.

Many had fled to the Teachers’ Village where an IDP camp has now been established.

 

It was initially built in January 2014 by the Borno State Government to serve as an accommodation for teachers in the state but by 2015 it became home to thousands of displaced persons fleeing from the insurgents.

Since November 2018, the camp has absorbed more than 20,000 newly displaced persons, bringing its total population to over 31,000 as against the planned capacity of about 5,000.

Congested IDP camp

 

“This camp initially is meant for about five or six thousand people but it has close to 10,000 because comfortably, people are living there. But there has been a mass influx of people as a result of the insurgency, so its population is now over 31 thousand,” an official of the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) in Borno, Usman Kachalla said.

 

 

The development has also become a source of serious concern for humanitarian partners like the UN who say they are worried about the imminent dangers such as fire accidents or disease outbreaks, among other things, associated with such congested living conditions.

But the Borno State government is stepping in to help in this regard by constructing new shelters for the displaced persons.

Already, some of the IDPs have started to relocate to the alternative shelter provided by the state government. One of the women leaders, Lami Mohammed, expressed gratitude over the new settlement.

“You cannot compare how we live here and the other place. Honestly, in the past we really faced difficult times; cold, mosquitoes and we were just outside. Our husbands slept in the open but here, we have our dignity and privacy and there’s enough space for everyone”.

 

Despite the provision of the basic amenities by the government, the welfare of the IDPs remains a topic of concern especially as women and children consist about 87% of the displaced population.

Explosion Rocks Borno, Police Evacuate Bomb From IDP Camp

NEMA Confirms Three Killed In Borno IDP Camp Fire

 

An explosion on Saturday rocked the Internally Displaced Persons (IDP)camp in Maiduguri, the Borno state capital on election day as voters were said to be waiting for accreditation.

Following the incident, residents of the area were thrown into panic and loud sounds were heard around the Pompomari area of the state.

The police EOD team also evacuated live artillery bomb from the Teachers village at the IDP camp.

The ammunition, shot from an RPG had thrown residents of Maiduguri into panic.

The explosions which started around 5:30 am were sustained till 6:15 causing panic in the city.

READ ALSO: Police Confirm Killing Of Voter In Kogi

Although the military is yet to respond to the incident but the Commissioner of Police Dalmatian Chukwu believes it is a friendly fire as according to him the military are only testing their equipment.

However, the situation has caused a set back in the camp with electoral officers just setting up for the day’s business, almost an hour behind schedule.

The IDPs are already on the queue waiting for accreditations to begin.

It is not clear if there are casualties from other parts of the town where the ammunition landed

NEMA Confirms Three Killed In Borno IDP Camp Fire

NEMA Confirms Three Killed In Borno IDP Camp Fire

 

Three persons have been killed in a fire outbreak at the Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) camp in Monguno, Borno State.

The National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA) confirmed this in a statement on Friday by its Head of Media and Public Relations, Mr Sani Datti.

According to him, the incident occurred on Thursday at the IDP camp in the town which is located about 137 kilometres from Maiduguri, the state capital.

“The fire which, occurred in the camp that is located inside the local stadium in Monguno town, affected about 7,839 persons with a total of three lives lost,” said Datti.

READ ALSORobbers Kill Policeman In Ekiti

He explained further, “The fire occurred at noon from one of the makeshift shelters where a woman was cooking and spread across the camp, destroying about 402 re-enforced/transitional shelters and 933 makeshift homes burnt.”

On behalf of the Federal Government, the Director General of NEMA, Mustapha Maihaja, sympathised with the government and the people of the state over the incident.

He also condoled with the displaced people and assured them that the agency was already working with other stakeholders to provide immediate relief assistance to those affected.

Three Killed, Seven Injured In Maiduguri IDP Camp Suicide Attack

Over 100 People Starve To Death In Somalia

No fewer than three people were killed while seven others sustained injuries following a suicide attack on Monday at an Internally Displaced Persons camp in Pulka, Borno State.

Pulka is a town in Gwoza local government of Borno state 135 kilometres away from Maiduguri, the Borno State capital.

READ ALSO: Buratai Calls For Regional Cooperation In Fighting Cross-Border Crimes

According to sources at the camp, the suicide bomber came to the entrance of the camp at about 11:00 a.m. on Monday morning and blew herself up leading to the death of three persons injuring seven others.

Pulka was liberated from the hands Boko Haram insurgents by the military in early 2016 after been held for close to two years.

Thousands of refugees taking refuge in Cameroun republic have been returning to the town owing to its liberation.

Monday’s suicide attack was the first in an IDP camp in the area since its liberation.

Security officials are yet to provide details of the attack or provide an official statement on the incidence.

Kogi Is Not An IDP Camp, Youths Protest

Youths in Kogi state in there hundred protesting against Senator Dino Melaye and members of the Senate who donated foodstuff for Kogi civil servants.

They said Kogi is not an IDP home, noting that the state governor Yahaya Bello is paying up to date.

The protesters blocked the Lokoja Abuja highway way for several minutes causing gridlock for travellers plying the road.

Benue Govt Warns IDP Camp Officials Against Diversion Of Relief Materials

The Benue State government has threatened to arrest any official caught diverting relief materials from the Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) camp set up in Makurdi for the victims of the flood in the state.

This warning by the government is following a stand-off between camp officials and the IDPs who demanded an explanation on the movement of relief materials out of the camp.

READ ALSO: UNHCR, NSCDC Donate Relief Materials To Benue Flood Victims

The deputy governor and chairman of the flood disaster management committee, in the state, Benson Abounu, issued the threats on Sunday following the alleged movement of relief materials without his approval.

But for the timely intervention of the Deputy Governor in the ensuing crisis, representatives of the IDPs were up against the camp management and the camp security which they accused of complicity in the unauthorized movement of the items.

The conflict between representatives of the IDPs and camp officials was almost turning into a free for all, before the attention of the deputy governor was drawn to the matter, upon arrival at the camp.

Cholera Outbreak: 14 Dead, 230 Admitted In Borno IDP Camp

Fourteen persons have died and 230 people are currently on admission following an Outbreak of cholera in an IDP camp at Muna garage in Borno State.

In response to the outbreak, the U.N. has opened an emergency hospital in the camp and the patients are currently being admitted in two facilities.

Officials of the World Health Organization, UNICEF and the Borno State Ministry of Health are all currently on ground and patients are being attended to.

HRW Reports Sharp Rise In HIV Prevalence In IDPs Camp

IDPsA report of the Human Rights Watch (HRW) made public on Monday showed that there is a sharp rise in the number of persons requiring treatment for HIV and Sexually transmitted Diseases in Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) camps in Nigeria’s northeast.

In the report, the HRW quoted a medical health worker in one of the camps, which had 10,000 residents, as saying that the number of persons requiring treatment rose sharply, from about 200 cases when the camp clinic was established in 2014 to more than 500 in July 2016.

Suffering In Silence

The health worker said she believed that many more women could be infected but were ashamed to go to the clinic, and are likely to be suffering in silence without treatment.

“Government officials and other authorities in Nigeria have raped and sexually exploited women and girls displaced by the conflict with Boko Haram,” the group said.

“It is bad enough that these women and girls are not getting much-needed support for the horrific trauma they suffered at the hands of Boko Haram,” a senior Nigeria researcher at Human Rights Watch, Mausi Segun, said.

“It is disgraceful and outrageous that people who should protect these women and girls are attacking and abusing them.”

The group said four of the victims were drugged and raped, while 37 were coerced into sex through false marriage promises and material and financial assistance.

Many of those coerced into sex said they were abandoned if they became pregnant. They and their children have suffered discrimination, abuse, and stigmatisation from other camp residents.

Eight of the victims said they were previously abducted by Boko Haram fighters and forced into marriage before they escaped to Maiduguri, the group further reported.

The group accused the Nigerian government of not doing enough to protect displaced women and girls and ensure that they have access to basic rights and services or to sanction the abusers, who include camp leaders, vigilante groups, policemen, and soldiers.

The report was the outcome of an investigation in July, 2016 by the group. It documented sexual abuse, including rape and exploitation, of 43 women and girls living in seven IDPs’ camps in Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State.

The victims had been displaced from several Borno towns and villages, including Abadam, Bama, Baga, Damasak, Dikwa, Gamboru Ngala, Gwoza, Kukawa, and Walassa.

In some cases, the victims had arrived in the under-served Maiduguri camps, where their movement is severely restricted after spending months in military screening camps.

HRW Report: Officials Abusing Displaced Women, Girls

Nigeria: Officials Abusing Displaced Women, Girls
Displaced by Boko Haram and Victims Twice Over

(Abuja, October 31, 2016) – Government officials and other authorities in Nigeria have raped and sexually exploited women and girls displaced by the conflict with Boko Haram, Human Rights Watch said today. The government is not doing enough to protect displaced women and girls and ensure that they have access to basic rights and services or to sanction the abusers, who include camp leaders, vigilante groups, policemen, and soldiers.

In late July, 2016, Human Rights Watch documented sexual abuse, including rape and exploitation, of 43 women and girls living in seven internally displaced persons (IDP) camps in Maiduguri, the Borno State capital. The victims had been displaced from several Borno towns and villages, including Abadam, Bama, Baga, Damasak, Dikwa, Gamboru Ngala, Gwoza, Kukawa, and Walassa. In some cases, the victims had arrived in the under-served Maiduguri camps, where their movement is severely restricted after spending months in military screening camps.

“It is bad enough that these women and girls are not getting much-needed support for the horrific trauma they suffered at the hands of Boko Haram,” said Mausi Segun, senior Nigeria researcher at Human Rights Watch. “It is disgraceful and outrageous that people who should protect these women and girls are attacking and abusing them.”

Four of the victims told Human Rights Watch that they were drugged and raped, while 37 were coerced into sex through false marriage promises and material and financial assistance. Many of those coerced into sex said they were abandoned if they became pregnant. They and their children have suffered discrimination, abuse, and stigmatization from other camp residents. Eight of the victims said they were previously abducted by Boko Haram fighters and forced into marriage before they escaped to Maiduguri.

A situational assessment of IDPs in the northeast in July 2016 by NOI Polls, a Nigerian research organization, reported that 66 percent of 400 displaced people in Adamawa, Borno, and Yobe states said that camp officials sexually abuse the displaced women and girls.

Women and girls abused by members of the security forces and vigilante groups – civilian self-defense groups working with government forces in their fight against Boko Haram – told Human Rights Watch they feel powerless and fear retaliation if they report the abuse. A 17-year-old girl said that just over a year after she fled the frequent Boko Haram attacks in Dikwa, a town 56 miles west of Maiduguri, a policeman approached her for “friendship” in the camp, and then he raped her.

“One day he demanded to have sex with me,” she said. “I refused but he forced me. It happened just that one time, but soon I realized I was pregnant. When I informed him about my condition, he threatened to shoot and kill me if I told anyone else. So I was too afraid to report him.”

The Boko Haram conflict has led to more than 10,000 civilian deaths since 2009; the abductions of at least 2,000 people, mostly women and children and large groups of students, including from Chibok and Damasak; the forced recruitment of hundreds of men; and the displacement of about 2.5 million people in northeast Nigeria.

Irregular supplies of food, clothing, medicine, and other essentials, along with restricted movement in the IDP camps in Maiduguri, compounds the vulnerability of victims – many of them widowed women and unaccompanied orphaned girls – to rape and sexual exploitation by camp officials, soldiers, police, members of civilian vigilante groups, and other Maiduguri residents. Residents of the Arabic Teachers Village camp, Pompomari, told Human Rights Watch in July that the camp had not received any food or medicines since late May, just before the start of the month-long Muslim fast of Ramadan.

Restricted movement in the camps is contrary to Principle 14.2 of the United Nations Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, which provides that internally displaced people have “the right to move freely in and out of camps and other settlements.”

In some cases, men used their positions of authority and gifts of desperately needed food or other items to have sex with women. A woman in a Dalori camp said residents get only one meal a day. She said she accepted the advances of a soldier who proposed marriage because she needed help in feeding her four children. He disappeared five months later when she told him she was pregnant.

Victims of rape and sexual exploitation may be less likely to seek health care, including psychological counselling, due to the shame they feel. Fewer than five of the 43 women and girls interviewed said they had received any formal counseling after they were raped or sexually exploited. A medical health worker in one of the camps, which has 10,000 residents, said that the number of people requiring treatment for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections has risen sharply, from about 200 cases when the camp clinic was established in 2014 to more than 500 in July 2016. The health worker said she believed that many more women could be infected but were ashamed to go to the clinic, and are likely to be suffering in silence without treatment.

The Borno State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) has direct responsibility for distributing aid, including food, medicine, clothes, and bedding, as well as managing the camps. Its national counterpart, the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), supplies raw food and other materials for internally displaced people to the state agency under a memorandum of understanding.

Aid workers have warned since early 2016 that displaced women have been forced to exchange sex for basic necessities and that various elements, including members of the security forces in northeast Nigeria, have been subjecting some of them to sexual and gender-based violence. A Rapid Protection Assessment Report published in May by the Borno State Protection Sector Working Group, made up of national and international aid providers, identified sexual exploitation, rape, and other sexual abuse as major concerns in nearly all 13 camps and several local communities hosting displaced people in and around Maiduguri.

Following his visit to Nigeria in August, the United Nations special rapporteur on the human rights of internally displaced persons, Chaloka Beyani, said Nigeria’s government had “a tendency to downplay the problem of sexual violence and abuse” of internally displaced people. He expressed concern that this tendency “constitutes a hidden crisis of abuse with fear, stigma and cultural factors as well as impunity for perpetrators leading to under-reporting of abuse to the relevant authorities.”

Human Rights Watch wrote to several Nigerian authorities in August requesting comment on the research findings. The minister of women affairs and social development, Senator Aisha Jumai Alhassan, promised in a meeting with Human Rights Watch on September 5 to investigate the allegations and then respond. Her response has not yet been received at time of writing.

“Failure to respond to these widely reported abuses amounts to severe negligence or worse by Nigerian authorities,” Segun said. “Authorities should provide adequate aid in the camps, ensure freedom of movement for all displaced people, safe and confidential health care for survivors, and punish the abusers.”

Victims’ Accounts

Movement Restrictions, Food Shortages Fuel Sexual Abuse

Most of the victims interviewed lived in camps for displaced people. While victims living at the Arabic Teachers’ Village camp said they were allowed to leave the camp for about eight hours daily, victims from other camps said that their movement was severely restricted. The women and girls became victims of rape and sexual exploitation when they accepted offers of friendship or marriage from men in positions of authority.

Rape

A 16-year-old girl who fled a brutal Boko Haram attack on Baga, near the shores of Lake Chad, northern Borno in January 2015, said she was drugged and raped in May 2015 by a vigilante group member in charge of distributing aid in the camp:

He knew my parents were dead, because he is also from Baga. He would bring me food items like rice and spaghetti so I believed he really wanted to marry me. But he was also asking me for sex. I always told him I was too small [young]. The day he raped me, he offered me a drink in a cup. As soon as I drank it, I slept off. It was in his camp room.

I knew something was wrong when I woke up. I was in pain, and blood was coming out of my private part. I felt weak and could not walk well. I did not tell anyone because I was afraid. When my menstrual period did not come, I knew I was pregnant and just wanted to die to join my dead mother. I was too ashamed to even go to the clinic for pregnancy care. I am so young! The man ran away from the camp when he heard I delivered a baby six months ago. I just feel sorry for the baby because I have no food or love to give him. I think he might die.

An 18-year-old girl from Kukawa, a Borno town 112 miles from Maiduguri, the state capital, said that a member of Civilian Joint Task Force – a self-defense vigilante group working with government forces in their fight against Boko Haram – initially gave her privileges, including passes that allowed her to leave the camp, but then raped her:

The man started with preaching, telling me to be a good Muslim girl and not to join bad groups in the camp. He then sent his mother to propose to me, which convinced me that he was serious. He allowed me to go outside the camp when necessary. When he asked me to visit his newly allocated room in the camp, I didn’t see any reason not to go because I felt safe with him. He gave me a bottle of Zobo [locally brewed non-alcoholic drink] and I immediately felt dizzy and slept off. I don’t know what happened thereafter but when I woke up he was gone and I was in pain and felt wet between my legs. For three days I could not walk properly.

Some weeks later I fell very ill, and was told at the hospital that I was pregnant. Then everyone turned away from me: [He] refused to help me, and my step-mother who I lived with in camp pushed me out, saying I was a disgrace. I reported [him] to the police in camp several times but they have not done anything to him because they work together. Whenever I see him, I wish something terrible will happen to him. It is because of him that I have lost everything. I don’t even think the baby will last because she is always crying and I can’t cope. I pray that God will forgive me for neglecting the baby but I am helpless.

Sexual Exploitation

A 30-year-old woman from Walassa, near Bama, about 43 miles west of Maiduguri, said that she fled into a nearby wooded area after Boko Haram fighters killed her husband and abducted her daughters, ages 12 and 9. She stayed there for three months, hoping to find a way to rescue her daughters, until Nigerian government soldiers arrived in the area and the fighters escaped with their captives:

A few weeks after soldiers transported us to the camp, near Maiduguri, one of the soldiers guarding us approached me for marriage. He used to bring food and clothes for me and my remaining four children, so I allowed him to have sex with me. He is a Hausa man from Gwoza. That is all I know about him. Two months later he just stopped coming. Then I realized I was pregnant. I feel so angry with him for deceiving me. When he was pretending to woo me he used to provide for me, but as soon as I agreed and we began having sex, his gifts began to reduce until he abandoned me. Now my situation is worse as the pregnancy makes me sick, and I have no one to help me care for my children.

A woman from Bama living at the same camp said:

The soldier showed his interest by bringing me food and clothes. He used to wear the green army uniform and carried a gun. I accepted him because I needed help to take care of me and my four children. Feeding in the camp is only once a day so you have to accept any help that comes. We started having sex in my camp tent – my sister who was sharing it with me left – or at night in the open field where soldiers stay in the camp. Five months later when I realized I was pregnant and told him, he stopped coming. I have not seen him since then. I feel so ashamed because my neighbors talk and stare at me. I cry whenever I think about him. I delivered the baby two months ago but he is also suffering – I eat once a day so [am] not producing enough milk to breast feed him well. Things are so bad in the camp, there is not enough water or food.

An 18-year old girl from Baga said when she met a member of the Civilian Joint Task Force in the camp, she felt she could trust him because he is also from Baga:

He took me from the camp to a house on Baga Road so we could meet freely. I stayed with him in that house for about one month. Then I fell ill, and went to a clinic. The people at the clinic asked for the person I was living with, and invited him. That was when they told him I was pregnant, and he accepted the pregnancy. But immediately [when] we came out of the clinic he took me to a man to abort the pregnancy. I refused and he said if I would not abort we should separate. Then I moved to the camp. I gave birth almost a year ago but the man has refused to take responsibility. Some months ago he followed the military to catch Boko Haram far from Maiduguri. Even when he visits his two wives in the camp he never asks for me and my baby. I go outside the camp to beg so that we can survive.

A 25-year-old woman at from Dikwa said that when she fled Boko Haram’s attack on the town, she lived with her brother in a rented apartment in Maiduguri. When he was no longer able to feed her and her three children, he took her to the camp where he handed her over to camp elders. One of these elders, a local government employee – who are often financially better off than most displaced people because they receive salaries – proposed marriage and regularly brought her food and money. But the marriage did not materialize, and he began to shun her when she became pregnant. He continued to ignore her when she delivered twins and asked him for money to pay for her midwife. The woman said:

If I have a gun, I will shoot him. It is because of him that people call me and my babies names. I am so ashamed that I cannot participate in camp activities and keep to myself because of the jeers.

A 17-year-old girl said that a young man she knew took her home to his grandmother when she arrived Maiduguri from Dikwa in mid-2014:

He told me he wanted to marry me, and his grandmother referred to me as her grandson’s wife. I lived with them, cooking and cleaning the house, until a month later when he disappeared for weeks. The grandmother asked me to leave, promising to come to the wedding… It was a lie. I did not know it but I was already pregnant. Maybe she already saw the pregnancy signs and I was too young to understand. I heard the grandson fled the town because he heard I have given birth. Now I have been left alone to fend for the baby. I don’t know if any other member of my family survived the Boko Haram attack on Dikwa.

Restricted Movement

A 32-year-old woman from the Damasak said:

Life is terrible here in this camp. For the past three days we have not eaten because there is no firewood to cook the food. To make it worse, they will not even allow us to go out to fend for ourselves. Most times you have to beg the camp officials to intervene with the guards before they will give you the pass to go out. Why will you refuse if any of those people ask you for marriage? You have to survive.

Another camp resident, a 47-year-old mother of eight from Abadam, a northern Borno town, said:

We used to get food at least twice a day when I first arrived at the camp in 2014. But now, sometimes we get nothing at all. We can’t even buy food ourselves because they will not let us go out. My relatives in the town have to plead with camp officials for hours before the officials will agree to let them give us some money or foodstuff from the little they have.

A 20-year-old widowed mother of one at a camp for displaced people said:

I have been refusing marriage proposals from the men in camp because I see how they are deceiving others. I am just not sure how long I can remain in this situation. The last time I ate was four days ago when the one cup of maize I was given finished. I am suffering because I have no husband or anyone else to assist me.

A 16-year-old single mother of one in the same camp said:

Life is difficult in the camp, hardly enough to eat. There is food but whoever gets it, gets it. We are not allowed to go out to find work or get extra food. Sometimes I go to the kitchen to scrape pots to get something to eat. They distribute tickets, some get tickets and some don’t get. If you don’t get a ticket you get no food. The IDP elders distribute the tickets, so they distribute amongst themselves, they make sure their families get first. Usually distribution of tickets take place at odd times such as at midnight.

If you are not married, you hardly get anything that comes in. Women who have husbands insult us: “If you want to eat in [this camp], you should get married in [the camp] so husbands can get food for you.”

Military Screening Centers

Displaced women from several communities re-captured from Boko Haram by the Nigerian army, including Baga, Bama, and Gwoza, told Human Rights Watch in Maiduguri that the Nigerian military operated screening centers where they interrogated local people to determine how much involvement they had with militants. While some women are screened in a few days, others are interrogated daily for months before being released to a camp. Witnesses said the interviewees were separated by gender, but that male soldiers interrogated everyone.

A woman who escaped her Boko Haram abductors in Sambisa with her three children while four months pregnant described their reception after an eight-hour trek back to her home town of Bama, then under government control:

Soldiers were already back in Bama when we arrived. They took us to a primary healthcare center near the entrance into Bama to search and question us. We thought they would soon let us go, but they locked us with other women (about 20 people) for more than three months. They bring us out one by one every day to ask whether we joined Boko Haram freely or they forced us. Many of us were naked or in rags until about one month later soldiers took us to town to search for clothes among the burnt ruins of houses in the town. I was very ill because of the pregnancy. After the third month passed they drove us in lorries to Maiduguri, and dropped off sick ones like me in the hospital.

A 20-year-old woman who was abducted in Gwoza by Boko Haram, and then escaped, said:

I was three months pregnant from the Boko Haram fighter that raped me when I escaped Gwoza with my three children. Our relief on arriving at Maiduguri after a two-day trek was crushed when soldiers arrested us. They took us to Giwa barracks, where we saw up to 300 other women and children. Soldiers used to question us every day until my children and I were released four months later.

There appears to be at least one other screening center around Maiduguri, Human Rights Watch found. A 17-year-old girl from Dikwa was held in a place she described as “a compound with about five buildings just before you enter Maiduguri proper.” She was allowed to receive visitors for the month she was there before being cleared by the military to enter Maiduguri.

Lack of Mental Health Support for Victims

Many of the women and girls interviewed said that their experiences affected their psychological well-being. Some said they had difficulty sleeping, and deliberately isolated themselves to avoid insults and slurs. Many also said they felt constantly angry with their abusers, wishing they could harm them in retaliation. None said they had professional counselling.

A 30-year-old woman from Gwoza said:

I feel sad all the time. I am always thinking about all the bad things that have happened to me. Sometimes I cry; at other times I try to resign to my fate. But it is hard. My neighbors in the camp encourage me to pray. That is all I can do, pray.

A 16-year-old rape survivor said she was always thinking about death, and wished she had the courage to kill herself:

Nobody comes to this camp to talk to us. We IDPs only have one another, but even that is hard because you do not know who to trust. If you tell them your secret pain or shame, they can use it to mock you later.

A 28-year-old woman who survived rape and became pregnant by a Boko Haram insurgent said she developed hypertension from constantly thinking about her ordeal and imagining ways she could take revenge on him. Doctors have told her during hospital visits outside the camp to stop thinking about the past so she can get better. She was not referred to a counsellor.