Katsina Govt Extends Lockdown Order After Eid-El-Fitr

A file photo of Katsina State Governor, Aminu Masari.

 

The Katsina State Government has extended the COVID-19 lockdown order in Katsina, Daura and Batagarawa which have been the most affected Local Government Areas of the state.

According to Governor Aminu Masari, the lockdown is effective from 7:00 am on Wednesday.

He announced this on Tuesday at the General Muhammadu Buhari Government House while highlighting the progress made so far in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic in the state.

The development comes days after the relaxation of the lockdown for Muslim faithful to celebrate the Eid-El-Fitri Sallah festival.

Giving an update on the COVID-19 situation in the state, Governor Masari said there are currently 337 active cases.

According to him, 294 of the cases are from Katsina, Daura and Batagarawa, while the remaining 43 cases were discovered from the remaining 32 LGAs in the state that now have zero cases of the virus.

He further revealed that of the 337 cases, 18 patients have lost their lives, while 51 have recovered and been discharged.

PHOTOS: Cleric Conducts Virtual Eid Sermon As Muslims Shun Praying Grounds

 

An Islamic cleric, Fuad Adeyemi, conducted a virtual sermon on Sunday to commemorate the Eid-El-Fitr.

Adeyemi is the Chief Imam of Al-Habbiyah Mosque in the Guzape District of Abuja, the Federal Capital Territory (FCT).

He gave his Eid sermon during a teleconference as Muslim faithful in Nigeria joined their counterparts across the world to celebrate the end of the Holy month of Ramadan.

This comes as Muslims shun praying grounds in the nation’s capital for the traditional congregational prayers, including that which is located at the National Mosque in Abuja.

READ ALSO: Nigeria Marks Eid-El-Fitr Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

Their action was in line with the directive of the Head of Jama’atu Nasril Islam (JNI) and Sultan of Sokoto, Sa’ad Abubakar III.

The sultan had suspended congregational prayers as part of measures to curb the further spread of coronavirus (COVID-19) in Nigeria.

See more photos below:

 

PHOTOS: Muslims Hold Congregational Eid Prayer In Katsina

Some Muslims gather at a praying ground in Katsina State in commemoration of the Eid-El-Fitr on May 24, 2020.

 

 

Muslim faithful in Katsina State have joined their counterparts across the globe to celebrate this year’s Eid-El-Fitr.

Hundreds of worshippers thronged the famous Usman Danfodio Juma’at Mosque to perform the two Raka’at Eid-El-Fitr prayers led by the Chief Imam, Ustaz Mukhtar Jibia.

The prayer held on the premises of the mosque on Sunday in the Katsina State capital.

In separate interviews with Channels Television, some of the worshippers described this year’s Eid as ironic, as they mark the end of the Holy month of Ramadan amid the coronavirus pandemic ravaging the world.

They commended the efforts of both the Federal and State governments in tackling the activities of bandits terrorising some states in the North West.

READ ALSO: Nigeria Marks Eid-El-Fitr Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

The residents also noted that the number of military personnel and other paramilitary apparatus deployed within the week to boost the fight against bandits was quite appreciable.

They, however, appealed to the government to double their efforts in the fight against kidnapping and cattle rustling in Katsina State.

Some of the highpoints of the Eid prayer are captured in the pictures below:

Some Muslims gather at a praying ground in Katsina State in commemoration of the Eid-El-Fitr on May 24, 2020.

Eid-El-Fitr: Gbajabiamila Urges Muslims To Pray Against COVID-19

A file photo of the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Femi Gbajabiamila.

 

 

The Speaker of the House of Representatives, Femi Gbajabiamila, has congratulated Muslims in Nigeria for concluding the Ramadan fast and marking the Eid-El-Fitr peacefully.

He, however, urged them to imbibe virtues such as feeding the needy, being their brother’s keepers, and pray for peaceful coexistence that usually come with the month of Ramadan.

Gbajabiamila made the appeal in a statement by his Special Adviser on Media and Publicity, Lanre Lasisi.

“I bring to Nigerian Muslims warm greetings at this season of Eid-el-Fitr. It is a season of remembrance of the good things that the Almighty Allah has done in our lives,” he said.

READ ALSO: Nigeria Marks Eid-El-Fitr Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

The lawmaker also called on the Muslim faithful to pray fervently for an end to the COVID-19 pandemic that has continued to ravage countries all over the world.

He asked them to adhere strictly to the teachings of the Holy Prophet Muhammad (SAW), whom he described as the best for all Muslims to emulate.

“Unfortunately, this year’s Eid-el-Fitr will be celebrated low-key, not by our own making, but that is how our Creator wills it.

“That is why we all must return to Him in prayers to bring an end to this COVID-19 pandemic,” the speaker noted.

He added, “I enjoin every Nigerian Muslim to be of good character and remain the best of examples, taking after the Holy Prophet (SAW).

“Let’s also pray for an end to insecurity and other challenges that we face as a nation.”

Eid-El-Fitr: Lawan Congratulates Muslims, Praises Frontline Workers

A file photo of the Senate President, Ahmad Lawan, during plenary at the upper chamber of the National Assembly in Abuja.

 

 

The Senate President, Ahmad Lawan, has congratulated Nigerians, especially the Muslim Ummah on the occasion of the Eid-El-Fitr.

In his Sallah message, the Senate President noted that the celebration marked the breaking of fast and the end of the Holy month of Ramadan.

He also commended the frontline workers in the fight against the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic in the country.

Lawan said, “I congratulate the Muslim faithful on the successful completion of the fasting period despite the formidable challenge of the COVID-19 pandemic which stood between us and total observance of key rituals of the period.”

READ ALSO: Nigeria Marks Eid-El-Fitr Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

“I wish to specially commend all our healthcare and other essential services providers who are at the frontline of the fight against COVID-19 and assure them of the full support of their lawmakers and representatives for victory against the vicious enemy,” he added.

The lawmaker called on Nigerians to continue to observe the health precautions and sustain the acts of purity, charity, perseverance, and tolerance in their daily lives and general conduct, even as the holy month has ended.

He also asked them to keep praying for Nigeria and for God’s intervention against all the challenges confronting the nation and the world in general.

The Senate President assured Nigerians that the National Assembly would continue to provide the initiatives and responses expected of a responsible Legislature in a vibrant democracy, and as an arm of a caring government.

He also urged the Muslims to celebrate with restraint as recommended by the spiritual leaders and relevant authorities.

Nigeria Marks Eid-El-Fitr Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

A crowd of Muslim faithful storm a praying ground in Nasarawa State for the Eid-El-Fitr congregational prayer on May 24, 2020. PHOTOS: Channels TV/ Sodiq Adelakun.

 

 

Muslims in Nigeria have joined their counterparts around the world to mark the Eid-El-Fitr as they bid farewell to the fasting month of Ramadan.

However, this year’s occasion could not be celebrated as the usual practice due to the ravaging coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

In most nations across the world, authorities have taken measures, such as the suspension of Eid prayers and outdoor festivals among other celebratory events, to curb the spread of the disease.

Eid-El-Fitr means “festival of breaking the fast” and celebrations would normally begin depending on the sighting of the moon.

Traditionally, Eid is celebrated for three days in all Muslim-majority countries but in Nigeria, the government has declared Monday and Tuesday as public holidays.

In his Sallah message to the nation, President Muhammadu Buhari urged Muslims to keep their spirits up in spite of the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to him, the pandemic caught the world off guard and has dampened what would otherwise have been a time of celebration for the Muslim faithful.

The President noted that the pandemic has also taken a heavy toll on the people’s spiritual, social and economic lives.

He said this year’s fasting period was challenging for Muslims because they had to forgo many important aspects of their daily worship.

President Buhari listed them to include the routine congregations for prayer and the recitation and interpretation of the Holy Qur’an, as well as travelling for the lesser pilgrimage to Makkah.

He stressed that although it was not easy to give up many of those important duties and activities, it was important to do so to limit the spread of coronavirus in the country.

The President, therefore, commended the sacrifices of both Muslims and Christians for their cooperation in the enforcement of the social distancing guidelines.

As of Saturday night, Nigeria has reported 7,526 cases of COVID-19, out of which 2,174 people have been discharged and 221 patients dead.

The fight against coronavirus is still on and governments in many nations have continued to step up restrictions that will help curtail the spread of the disease.

They have also appealed to citizens, including Muslims to abide by all necessary guidelines for their safety as they celebrate Eid-El-Fitr.

COVID-19 Lockdowns Stifle Eid-El-Fitr Celebrations

This picture, taken early on May 24, 2020, shows an Imam in a podium while Saudi security forces members, some clad in masks due to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic, stand between rows of worshippers gathering before the Kaaba at the Grand Mosque in Saudi Arabia’s holy city of Mecca to attend the prayers of Eid al-Fitr, the Muslim holiday which starts at the conclusion of the holy fasting month of Ramadan. AFP

 

 

Muslims around the world began marking a sombre Eid al-Fitr Sunday, many under coronavirus lockdown, but lax restrictions offer respite to worshippers in some countries despite fears of skyrocketing infections.

The three-day festival, which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan, is traditionally celebrated with mosque prayers, family feasts and shopping for new clothes, gifts and sweet treats.

But this year, the celebration is overshadowed by the fast-spreading coronavirus, with many countries tightening lockdown restrictions after a partial easing during Ramadan led to a sharp spike in infections.

Further dampening the festive spirit, many countries — from Saudi Arabia to Egypt, Turkey and Syria — have banned mass prayer gatherings, a festival highlight, to limit the spread of the disease.

Saudi Arabia, home to Islam’s holiest sites, began a five-day, round-the-clock curfew from Saturday after infections more than quadrupled since the start of Ramadan to over 70,000 — the highest in the Gulf.

Mecca’s Grand Mosque has been almost devoid of worshippers since March, with a stunning emptiness enveloping the sacred Kaaba — the large cube-shaped structure towards which Muslims around the world pray.

READ ALSO: Nigeria Marks Eid-El-Fitr Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

But on Sunday, an imam stood on a podium while Saudi security forces, some wearing masks, stood between rows of worshippers gathering before the Kaaba to perform Eid prayers — their prayer mats placed in well-spaced arcs.

At Jerusalem’s Al-Aqsa mosque, Islam’s third-holiest site after Mecca and Medina, prayers were not permitted inside, although the site is expected to reopen after the Eid holiday.

At dawn, small scuffles broke out between Israeli security forces and worshippers gathering around the mosque, although prayers eventually went ahead outside, an AFP photographer said.

In Gaza, Hamas authorities allowed prayers in mosques despite the enclave’s first coronavirus death on Saturday, but worshippers mostly wore masks and placed their prayer mats far apart.

“Eid is not Eid with the atmosphere of corona — people feel a sense of fear,” worshipper Akram Taher told AFP.

– Fears of ‘new peak’ –

Muslims across Asia — from Indonesia to Pakistan, Malaysia and Afghanistan — have thronged markets for festival shopping, flouting coronavirus guidelines and sometimes even police attempts to disperse large crowds.

“For over two months my children were homebound,” said Ishrat Jahan, a mother of four, at a bustling market in the Pakistani city of Rawalpindi.

“This feast is for the kids, and if they can’t celebrate it with new garments, there is no point in us working so hard throughout the year.”

But the holiday began on a sombre note after a Pakistan International Airline flight crashed in the southern city of Karachi on Friday, killing 97 people including many who were travelling to see family for the holiday.

The English daily Dawn said the crash, along with the pandemic, had robbed the country of “whatever little joy had been left at the prospect of Eid festivities.”

In Indonesia — the world’s most populous Muslim nation — people have turned to smugglers and fake travel documents to get around bans on the annual end-of-Ramadan travel that could send infections soaring.

In the conservative province of Aceh, large groups prayed together with few masks and little social distancing, and the Baiturrahman Grand Mosque in the provincial capital was packed.

“I did feel worried but as a Muslim, I still had to perform mass Eid prayers as a form of gratitude to Allah,” one worshipper, Arsi, told AFP.

COVID-19 death tolls across the Middle East and Asia have been lower than in Europe and the United States, but numbers are rising steadily, sparking fears the virus may overwhelm often underfunded healthcare systems.

Iran, which has experienced the Middle East’s deadliest outbreak, has called on its citizens to avoid travel during Eid as it battles to control infection rates.

Health Minister Saeed Namaki said the country was focusing hard on avoiding “new peaks of the disease” caused by people “not respecting health regulations”.

– ‘Comedy night’ –

The United Arab Emirates has tightened its lockdown which had been relaxed during Ramadan, but that has not stopped some families from planning getaways to luxury beachfront hotels.

However, Muslims in many countries are set for frugal celebrations amid growing financial distress.

The twin shocks of coronavirus restrictions and falling oil prices have plunged the region into the worst economic crisis in decades.

The lockdowns have hit businesses hard, including retailers who would normally be preparing for the festive rush, as Muslims save their money for masks, gloves and other COVID-19 protective gear.

In the Syrian capital Damascus, Eid shoppers rummaged through flea markets for clothes at bargain prices as the war-ravaged and sanctions-hit country grapples with a much more entrenched economic crisis.

“The flea market is the only place I can buy something new to wear for the Eid holidays,” 28-year-old Sham Alloush told AFP.

“Had it not been for this place, I wouldn’t have been able to buy new clothes at all.”

But promising some laughs in these dire times, 40 Muslim comedians from across the world will host a virtual show on Sunday called “The Socially Distant Eid Comedy Night”.

“This Ramadan has been particularly difficult for communities around the world,” said Muddassar Ahmed, head of the Concordia Forum, the organiser of the event.

“We’re proud to be pulling together some of the brightest Muslim comedic talents to entertain those celebrating the Eid festival at home, people looking to learn a little bit about Muslim culture, or really anyone in need of a good laugh.”

AFP

Eid-El-Fitr: Keep Your Spirits Up In Spite Of COVID-19, Buhari Tells Muslims

A file photo of President Muhammadu Buhari. Photo: [email protected]

 

President Muhammadu Buhari has urged Muslims to keep their spirits up in spite of the COVID-19.

The President gave the encouragement in a Sallah message on the occasion of the Eid-el-Fitr on Saturday.

According to him, the pandemic caught the world off guard and has dampened what would otherwise have been a time of celebration for the Muslim faithful who are marking the end of the Ramadan fasting period.

“The COVID-19 pandemic has taken a heavy toll on the people’s spiritual, social and economic lives,” he said, adding that “this year’s fasting period was particularly challenging for Muslims because they had to forgo many important aspects of their daily worship, including the routine congregations for prayer and the recitation and interpretation of the Holy Qur’an as well as travelling for the lesser pilgrimage to Makkah.”

Read Also: Tribunal Affirms Election Of Yahaya Bello As Kogi Governor

President Buhari, however, noted that while it was not easy to give up many of those important duties and activities, it became imperative to do so in order to limit the spread of the coronavirus.

“Let me use this opportunity to commend the sacrifices of both Muslims and Christians for their cooperation in the enforcement of the social distancing guidelines. I am well aware of the inconveniences these tough measures have brought on the lives of Nigerians, including limiting religious activities and gatherings in large numbers,” the President noted, adding that “no government would intentionally impose these tough and demanding measures on its citizens if it had a choice.”

Speaking further, he noted that “this year’s Eid event is an occasion for sober reflection rather than celebration.”

He also appealed to other Nigerians “whose businesses and means of livelihoods were badly affected by the prolonged lockdown measures for their understanding and cooperation.”

He assured them that the lockdown measures would not go on longer than necessary because they would be reviewed from time to time to ease the increasing hardships on the people.

Meanwhile, the president urged those who have the means to continue helping their neighbours and the less well-to-do “so that we can all come out of this pandemic stronger and more united.”

He prayed that Allah eases the hardship among the people as the country struggles to flatten the curve while wishing all Nigerians “Eid Mubarak.”

Sultan Declares Sunday As Eid-El-Fitr

A file phot of the Sultan of Sokoto, Sa’ad Abubakar III.

 

The Sultan of Sokoto and President-General of the Nigeria Supreme Council of Islamic Affairs, Muhammad Sa’ad Abubakar, has declared Sunday, May 24, 2020, as the first day of Shawwal 1441 after Hijrah, and as such, the Eid-el-Fitr.

The Sultan revealed this in a statement signed by the chairman advisory committee on religious affairs Sultanate council, Sambo Wali Jinaidu.

According to the statement, the national moon sighting committee did not receive any report from the various moon sighting committees across the country confirming the sighting of the new moon of Shawwal 1441AH on Friday May 22, 2020.

Read Also: COVID-19: Sultan Orders Suspension Of Eid-El-Fitr Prayers

He therefore, stated that Saturday, May 23, 2020 is the 30th day of the month of Ramadan 1441AH.

Accordingly, the Sultan urged all Muslims to continue to pray for peace, progress, and development of the country while wishing them Allah’s guidance and blessings, even as he wished them a Happy Eid-El-Fitr.

COVID-19: Sultan Orders Suspension Of Eid-El-Fitr Prayers

A file phot of the Sultan of Sokoto, Sa’ad Abubakar III.

 

 

The Sultan of Sokoto and Head of Jama’atul Nasril Islam (JNI), Sa’ad Abubakar III, has directed the suspension of Eid-el-Fitr congregational prayers in the outskirts of towns and cities across the country.

He gave the directive in a statement on Thursday by the JNI Secretary-General, Dr Khalid Aliyu.

The Sultan, who is also the President-General of the Nigeria Supreme Council for Islamic Affairs (NSCIA), urged Muslims to observe the Eid-el-Fitr prayer at home with family members, or alone in the case of an individual living alone.

He also counselled the state governments that have reached concrete decisions to observe the Eid-el-Fitr prayer, based on their medical experts’ advice.

READ ALSO: Nigeria Records Eight More COVID-19 Deaths, Total Now 200

The traditional ruler urged them to ensure that the worshippers observe the strictest measures of distancing, face masks, and the use of hand sanitisers at the praying ground.

According to him, the authorities should consider using neighbourhood mosques if it becomes necessary to observe the prayer in an open space.

The Sultan also urged Ulamas to fear Allah and be mature enough in guarding their utterances and actions for the overall interest of the Deen and the Ummah.

The statement said, “Nigerian Muslims are, therefore, called upon to reflect their minds to the good virtues of the month of Ramadan and keep to its teachings all through their respective lives, as the Lord of Ramadan, is still and shall remain The Lord of other months, and above all keeps the records of our actions and inactions.

“More so, Muslims are reminded to keep to the ordinances of the Glorious Qur’an, for the prestige of the Muslim Ummah.”

IBB Confident Buhari Will Tackle Security Challenges

 

Former military president, Ibrahim Babangida, has said that he is hope in President Muhammadu Buhari’s promise to tackle security challenges in the country.

He stated this on Tuesday during an interview with Channels Television in Minna, the Niger State capital.

General Babangida, however, urged the President to tackle the challenges decisively as expressed in his message to Nigerians.

READ ALSO: Abachas 211 Million Pounds Loot Uncovered In Channel Island Report

“He (Buhari) made a promise and I believe he will fulfill it,” said the former military leader.

IBB added, “He said that the security situation will be dealt with very decisively; this is the message he sent and I trust he will do that.”

He also urged Nigerians to remain peaceful and uphold the lessons they have learned during the Ramadan fast.

“I sincerely pray for the people of this country and urge them to live in peace with one another to avoid anything that will bring a problem to the people and to the country,” IBB said.

Eid-El-Fitr: Fayemi Seeks Peaceful Living To Tackle Violence, Banditry

 

Ekiti State Governor, Dr Kayode Fayemi, has congratulated Muslim faithful in the state and in the country in general on the celebration of the Eid-el-Fitr, which marks the end of the Ramadan period.

In his Eid-el-Fitr message in Ado Ekiti on Tuesday, the governor congratulated Muslims on the successful completion of the fast.

He noted that witnessing another Eid-el-Fitr was a special privilege from Allah and not by power or might.

Governor Fayemi said the 30-day spiritual exercise had drawn the faithful closer to Allah and, therefore, urged them to put all the lessons learned during the holy month into good use, especially in their daily dealings with fellow citizens.

He stressed that the current situation in the country and in the world at large has made it imperative for Muslims and adherents of other religions to live in love, peace, and harmony with one another so that they can collectively confront and arrest the menace of violence and banditry.

The Governor said prayers by the faithful were needed more than ever for Gods intervention in the affairs of the country.

He was also confident in the ability of God to prosper and keep the country in answer to the sincere prayers of the faithful.

Fayemi, who commended Muslims in the state for their unflinching support for his administration through prayers, counsel and active participation in governance, also appreciated them for their contributions to the religious harmony being enjoyed in the state.

He urged adherents of all religions in the state to join the government in promoting peace and orderliness, and in restoring the core values of honesty, honour, hard work for which the state was renowned.

“On behalf of the government and Ekitikete, I congratulate the Muslim Ummah on the Eid-el-Fitr celebration, and pray that God Almighty will accept our prayers and grant all our heart desires, even as he preserves our lives to witness many more celebrations,” the governor was quoted as saying in a statement by his Chief Press Secretary, Mr Yinka Oyebode.